Judge Gorsuch’s Jurisprudence, and More from CRS

A new report from the Congressional Research Service examines the judicial record of U.S. Supreme Court nominee Judge Neil M. Gorsuch in advance of his Senate confirmation hearing. “The report begins by discussing the nominee’s views on two cross-cutting issues — the role of the judiciary and statutory interpretation. It then addresses fourteen separate areas […]

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CIA Asserts State Secrets Privilege in Torture Case

The Central Intelligence Agency formally asserted the state secrets privilege this week in order to prevent disclosure of seven categories of information concerning its post-9/11 interrogation program, and to prevent the deposition of three CIA officers concerning the program. The move was first reported in the New York Times (“State Secrets Privilege Invoked to Block […]

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History of Attorney General Recusal, and More from CRS

“The recent announcement by U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions that he would recuse himself from any investigations into President Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign has raised questions about how often recusals by the Attorney General have happened in the past.” “While there is no official compilation of recusals, it appears that Attorneys General of the […]

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Declassification of Indonesia Files in Progress

Updated below The National Declassification Center has completed declassification review of more than half of the classified files from the U.S. Embassy in Djakarta, Indonesia from the turbulent years of 1963-1966. The remainder of the task is expected to be completed by this summer. So far, 21 of 37 boxes of classified Djakarta Embassy files […]

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JASON on Subcritical Nuclear Tests

Subcritical nuclear tests remain useful for maintaining the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile in the absence of nuclear explosive testing, the JASON defense advisory panel affirmed in a letter report last year. But “a gap exists in the current US capability to carry out and diagnose such experiments,” the panel said. Subcritical experiments simulate aspects of […]

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Anti-Money Laundering, and More from CRS

A new report from the Congressional Research Service provides a comprehensive overview of government efforts to combat money-laundering, discussing the scope of the money-laundering problem, the strategies employed to combat it, and the resources that have been made available for that purpose. The US government has provided anti-money laundering support to more than 100 countries. […]

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Deterring, and Relying Upon, Russia

In confronting Russia and rebutting its claims, the United States is hampered by unnecessary or inappropriate classification of national security information, according to former Pentagon official and Russia specialist Evelyn Farkas. “We are not very good at declassifying and reclassifying information that is not propaganda, showing pictures of what the Russians are doing,” Dr. Farkas […]

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Iran Policy and the European Union, & More from CRS

New and updated reports from the Congressional Research Service include the following. Iran Policy and the European Union, CRS Insight, February 27, 2017 The European Union: Current Challenges and Future Prospects, updated February 27, 2017 The United Arab Emirates (UAE): Issues for U.S. Policy, updated February 28, 2017 Military Retirement: Background and Recent Developments, updated […]

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37 Leak Cases Were Reported to Dept of Justice in 2016

Executive branch agencies submitted 37 “crimes reports” to the Department of Justice last year regarding leaks of classified information. In response to a Freedom of Information Act request, wrote Patricia Matthews of the DOJ National Security Division, “We have conducted a search of the Counterintelligence and Export Control Section.  A records search of that Section […]

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Army Intelligence: A Look to the Future

Collection of more intelligence-related information does not necessarily translate into better intelligence. “Because of limitations associated with human cognition, and because much of the information obtained in war is contradictory or false, more information will not equate to better understanding.” What makes that sensible observation doubly interesting is that it was written by Lt.Gen. H.R. […]

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