Striving For A Safer World Since 1945

Striving for a Safer World since 1945

In November 1945, the Federation of Atomic Scientists was founded by Manhattan Project scientists who helped construct the first atomic bombs.

These scientists were united by the credo that all scientists, engineers, and other technically-trained thinkers have an ethical obligation to ensure the technological fruits of their intellect and labor are applied to the benefit of humankind.

Today, the Federation of American Scientists continues to strengthen its network of experts and thinkers to uphold its mission established in 1945: strive to make the world a safer, more informed place.

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Recent Activity

DoD Says US, Turkey on a Collision Course

Turkey’s pending procurement of a Russian surface to air missile system would jeopardize its status in NATO, and disrupt other aspects of US military relations with that country, the Department of Defense told Congress. “The U.S. Government has made cl …

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Religious Support to Military Funerals

The US Army has issued updated guidance on military funerals that notably emphasizes freedom of religion and individual choice. “The Army requires the capability to provide RS [religious support] across austere and isolated locations which accommodates …

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Defense Primers, Costs of War, and More from CRS

Several short introductions to basic aspects of U.S. military policy have recently been updated by the Congressional Research Service. Intended for congressional consumers, they may also be useful to others. Defense Primer: Organization of U.S. Ground …

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An X reveals a Diamond: locating Israeli Patriot batteries using radar interference

Amid a busy few weeks of nuclear-related news, an Israeli researcher made a very surprising OSINT discovery that flew somewhat under the radar.

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Next HASC Chair Sees Need for Greater DoD Transparency

Rep. Adam Smith (D-WA), the likely chair of the House Armed Services Committee in the next Congress, told congressional colleagues that enhancing national security transparency is among his top oversight priorities. “Together, we have made strides on n …

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Defense Primers, and More from CRS

Incoming members of Congress face a steep learning curve in trying to understand, let alone master, many diverse areas of public policy such as national defense. To help facilitate that learning process, the Congressional Research Service has issued a …

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Classified Anti-Terrorist Ops Raise Oversight Questions

Last February, the Secretary of Defense initiated three new classified anti-terrorist operations intended “to degrade al Qaeda and ISIS-affiliated terrorists in the Middle East and specific regions of Africa.” A glimpse of the new operations was provid …

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Presidential Disability and the 25th Amendment

Under the 25th amendment to the Constitution, a U.S. President could be declared “disabled” and removed from office against his will by the Vice President acting together with a majority of the Cabinet. A new report from the Congressional Research Serv …

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NNSA Plan Shows Nuclear Warhead Cost Increases and Expanded Production

By Hans M. Kristensen NNSA has published the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Plan for Fiscal Year 2019, which updates the agency’s work on producing and maintaining the U.S. stockpile of nuclear warheads. The latest plan follows the broad outlines …

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Invention Secrecy Hits Recent High

Last year the number of patent applications that were subject to a “secrecy order” under the Invention Secrecy Act of 1951 was the highest that it has been in more than two decades, according to data obtained from the US Patent and Trademark Office. Wh …

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