SECRECY NEWS
from the FAS Project on Government Secrecy
Volume 2014, Issue No. 20
March 7, 2014

Secrecy News Blog: http://blogs.fas.org/secrecy/

SOME LEGISLATORS SEEK MORE INTELLIGENCE BUDGET DISCLOSURE

Now that annual disclosure of the intelligence budget total has become routine, some legislators are seeking more transparency on intelligence spending.

As anticipated, the requested U.S. intelligence budget for Fiscal Year 2015 that was submitted to Congress this week fell below the current year's level and continued a decline from the post-9/11 high that it reached in FY 2010.

The "base" funding request for the National Intelligence Program (NIP) for FY 2015 was $45.6 billion, while the base funding request for the Military Intelligence Program (MIP) was $13.3 billion. ("Base" funding does not include funding for "overseas contingency operations," which is to be requested later in the year.) By comparison, the base funding request for the NIP in FY 2014 was $48.2 billion, and the base funding request for the MIP was $14.6 billion. Additional data on intelligence budget appropriations can be found here:

An unclassified summary of the FY 2015 National Intelligence Program budget request (that was included in the overall budget request) implied that the publication of the request was a voluntary act of transparency.

"Reflecting the Administration's commitment to transparency and open government, the Budget continues the practice begun in the 2012 Budget of disclosing the President's aggregate funding request for the NIP," the summary said.

In fact, however, the publication of the NIP budget request is required by law, since it was included in the FY 2010 Intelligence Authorization Act by the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence (Public Law 111-259, section 601). An ODNI news release on the budget request correctly cited the legal requirement to publicly disclose the budget request figure.

On the other hand, there is no corresponding legal requirement for the Department of Defense to publish the budget request for the Military Intelligence Program. But DoD has done so voluntarily since 2012, a move that represents a genuine reduction in official secrecy by the Obama Administration.

Even so, dozens of Congressmen say that there is still too much secrecy in intelligence spending. The Intelligence Budget Transparency Act of 2014 (HR 3855), introduced by Rep. Cynthia M. Lummis (R-WY), would require disclosure of the total budget of each of the individual 16 agencies that make up the U.S. intelligence community.

"Writing checks without any idea of where the money is going is bad policy," said Rep. Lummis in a January 14, 2014 release. "Disclosing the top-line budgets of each of our intelligence agencies promotes basic accountability among the agencies charged with protecting Americans without compromising our national security interests."

"The top-line intelligence budgets for America's 16 intelligence agencies are unknown to the American taxpayer and largely unknown to the Members of Congress who represent them," added Rep. Peter Welch (D-VT), a co-sponsor of the bill. "It's led to dubious policies, wasted money and questionable effectiveness. Requiring the public disclosure of top-line intelligence spending is an essential first step in assuring that our taxpayers and our national security interests are well served."

Interestingly, the bill's 59 congressional co-sponsors include a roughly equal number of Republicans and Democrats. Republican legislators have not previously been known to favor disclosure of individual agency intelligence budgets, with the exception of the late Sen. Arlen Specter, a former chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee, who once advocated release of the NRO budget total.

A February 12 letter to President Obama asking him to release the individual agency budget figures was signed by 62 members of Congress. http://www.welch.house.gov/press-releases/62-lawmakers-call-on-president-to-reveal-top-line-intelligence-spending-levels-in-fy2015-budget/

Many of the classified portions of the new Department of Defense budget request were tabulated in "Read the Pentagon's $59 Billion 'Black Budget'" by Brandy Zadrozny, The Daily Beast, March 6.


RUSSIAN SECURITY ISSUES AND US INTERESTS, AND MORE FROM CRS

New or updated reports from the Congressional Research Service that Congress has withheld from online public access include the following.

Russian Political, Economic, and Security Issues and U.S. Interests, March 5, 2014:

China Naval Modernization: Implications for U.S. Navy Capabilities -- Background and Issues for Congress, February 28, 2014:

Direct Overt U.S. Aid Appropriations for and Military Reimbursements to Pakistan, FY2002-FY2015, March 6, 2014:

Venezuela: Background and U.S. Relations, February 28, 2014:

Israel: Background and U.S. Relations, February 28, 2014:

Army Drawdown and Restructuring: Background and Issues for Congress, February 28, 2014:

Terrorism Risk Insurance: Issue Analysis and Overview of Current Program, March 4, 2014:

Federal Minimum Wage, Tax-Transfer Earnings Supplements, and Poverty, February 28, 2014:

U.S. Farm Income, February 28, 2014:

Prevalence of Mental Illness in the United States: Data Sources and Estimates, February 28, 2014:

Early Release for Federal Inmates: Fact Sheet, February 3, 2014:

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Secrecy News is written by Steven Aftergood and published by the Federation of American Scientists.

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