PDF Version

[Federal Register Volume 80, Number 89 (Friday, May 8, 2015)]
[Proposed Rules]
[Pages 26501-26511]
[FR Doc No: 2015-10260]


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NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION

Information Security Oversight Office

32 CFR Part 2002

[FDMS No. NARA-15-0001; NARA-2015-037]
RIN 3095-AB80


Controlled Unclassified Information

AGENCY: Information Security Oversight Office, NARA.

ACTION: Proposed rule.

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SUMMARY: As the Federal Government's Executive Agent for Controlled 
Unclassified Information (CUI), the Information Security Oversight 
Office (ISOO) of the National Archives and Records Administration 
(NARA) implements the Federal Government-wide CUI Program. As part of 
that responsibility, ISOO proposes this rule to establish policy for 
agencies on designating, safeguarding, disseminating, marking, 
decontrolling, and disposing of CUI, self-inspection and oversight 
requirements, and other facets of the Program.

DATES: Submit comments on or before July 7, 2015.

ADDRESSES: You may submit comments, identified by RIN 3095-AB80, by any 
of the following methods:
     Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov. 
Follow the instructions for submitting comments.
     Email: [email protected] Include RIN 3095-AB80 
in the subject line of the message.
     Fax: 301-837-0319. Include RIN 3095-AB80 in the subject 
line of the fax cover sheet.
     Mail (for paper, disk, or CD-ROM submissions. Include RIN 
3095-AB80 on the submission): Regulations Comment Desk, Strategy 
Division (SP); Suite 4100; National and Archives Records 
Administration; 8601 Adelphi Road; College Park, MD 20740-6001.
     Hand delivery or courier: Deliver comments to front desk 
at the address above.
    Instructions: All submissions must include NARA's name and the 
regulatory information number for this rulemaking (RIN 3095-AB80). We 
may publish any comments we receive without changes, including any 
personal information you include.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kimberly Keravuori, by email at 
[email protected], or by telephone at 301-837-3151. You may 
also find more information about the CUI Program, and some FAQs, on

[[Page 26502]]

NARA's Web site at http://www.archives.gov/cui/.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background. The President is committed to 
making the Government more open to the American people, as outlined in 
his January 21, 2009, memorandum to the heads of executive branch 
agencies. However, the Government must still protect some unclassified 
information, pursuant to and consistent with applicable laws, 
regulations, and Government-wide policies. This information is called 
Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI).
    Prior to Executive Order 13556, Controlled Unclassified 
Information, 75 FR 68675 (November 4, 2010) (the Order), more than 100 
different markings for such information existed across the executive 
branch. This ad hoc, agency-specific approach created inefficiency and 
confusion, led to a patchwork system that failed to adequately 
safeguard information requiring protection, and unnecessarily 
restricted information-sharing.
    As a result, the Order established the CUI Program to standardize 
the way the executive branch handles information that requires 
safeguarding or dissemination controls (excluding information that is 
classified under Executive Order 13526, Classified National Security 
Information, 75 FR 707 (December 29, 2009), or any predecessor or 
successor order; or the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (42 U.S.C. Sec.  
2011, et seq.), as amended.
    To develop policy and provide oversight for the CUI Program, the 
Order also appointed NARA as the CUI Executive Agent. NARA has 
delegated this authority to the Director of ISOO, a NARA component.

Regulatory Analysis

Review Under Executive Orders 12866 and 13563

    Executive Order 12866, Regulatory Planning and Review, 58 FR 51735 
(September 30, 1993), and Executive Order 13563, Improving Regulation 
and Regulation Review, 76 FR 23821 (January 18, 2011), direct agencies 
to assess all costs and benefits of available regulatory alternatives 
and, if regulation is necessary, to select regulatory approaches that 
maximize net benefits (including potential economic, environmental, 
public health and safety effects, distributive impacts, and equity). 
This proposed rule is ``significant'' under section 3(f) of Executive 
Order 12866 because it sets out a new program for Federal agencies. The 
Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has reviewed this regulation.

Review Under the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601, et seq.)

    This review requires an agency to prepare an initial regulatory 
flexibility analysis and publish it when the agency publishes the 
proposed rule. This requirement does not apply if the agency certifies 
that the rule will not, if promulgated, have a significant economic 
impact on a substantial number of small entities (5 U.S.C. 603). NARA 
certifies, after review and analysis, that this proposed rule will not 
have a significant adverse economic impact on small entities. However, 
information on the number of small entities contracting, or wishing to 
contract, with the executive branch that have not already implemented 
appropriate information systems standards for handling CUI is 
unreported and difficult to collect, in part because it could reflect 
adversely on a contractor in other ways. As a result, while NARA 
believes from all available information that the economic impact would 
be minimal, if any, we are opening this issue to public comment in 
addition to the content of the proposed rule, in case reviewers have 
additional information to the contrary that was not available to NARA.
    The CUI Program provides a unified system for handling unclassified 
information that requires safeguarding or dissemination controls, and 
sets consistent, executive branch-wide standards and markings for doing 
so. The CUI Program has established controls pursuant to and consistent 
with already-existing applicable law, Federal regulations, and 
Government-wide policy. However, because those authorities, as well as 
ad hoc agency policies and practices, were often applied in different 
ways by different agencies, the CUI Program also establishes 
unambiguous policy, requirements, and consistent standards.
    The Order establishes that the CUI Executive Agent, designated as 
NARA, ``shall develop and issue such directives as are necessary'' to 
implement the CUI Program (Section 4b). NARA has delegated this 
authority to the Director of the Information Security Oversight Office 
(ISOO). Consistent with this tasking, and with the CUI Program's 
mission to establish uniform policies and practices across the Federal 
Government, NARA is issuing a regulation, to establish the required 
controls and markings Government-wide. There is no viable alternative 
to a rule for meeting the Order's mandate to establish consistent 
information security standards Government-wide. A regulation binds 
agencies throughout the executive branch to uniformly apply the 
Program's standard safeguards, markings, and disseminating and 
decontrol requirements. The proposed rule contains a consistent program 
that NARA developed in consultation with affected stakeholders, 
including private industry and Federal agencies. While developing this 
program, NARA conducted working group discussions and surveys, 
consolidated and streamlined current practices, and developed initial 
drafts that underwent both formal and informal agency comment and CUI 
Executive Agent comment adjudication for individual policy elements.
    NARA believes that this proposed rule will benefit industry that 
contracts with the Federal Government, including small businesses. In 
the present contractor environment, differing requirements and 
conflicting guidance from agencies for the same types of information 
gives rise to confusion and inefficiencies for contractors working with 
more than one agency or handling information originating from different 
agencies. A single standard that de-conflicts requirements for 
contractors or potential contractors when contracting with multiple 
Government agencies will be simpler to execute and reduce costs. 
Because the regulation's uniform controls derive from already-required 
laws, regulations, and Government-wide policies, the standards are 
already ones with which businesses should be complying and the impact 
of the rule should be minimal or non-existent.
    Those entities that currently do not implement information systems 
security controls for CUI consistent with requirements contained in the 
regulation will need to make changes and implement new practices, which 
could therefore have an impact on such businesses. Consistent with the 
Order, these requirements are based on applicable Government-wide 
standards and guidelines issued by the National Institute of Standards 
and Technology (NIST), and applicable policies established by OMB 
(Section 6a3). These standards, which OMB and NIST established, have 
been in effect for some time, and were not created by this proposed 
rule. Rather, the proposed rule requires use of these standards in the 
same way throughout the executive branch, thereby reducing current 
complexity for agencies and contractors. The potential impact on 
businesses currently not in compliance with these standards arises from 
the possibility that some might need to take actions to bring 
themselves into compliance with

[[Page 26503]]

already-existing requirements if they are not already. From all 
available information, NARA believes this impact will be minimal, but 
reporting on non-compliance with these OMB and NIST standards is 
limited. If any businesses are not in compliance with these 
requirements, or are substantially out of compliance, the impact on 
those entities may be significant.
    NARA has taken steps, however, to alleviate the difficulty for 
contractors and small businesses of complying with information systems 
requirements, whether they already comply or will need to comply in 
future. Many of the security controls contained in the NIST guidelines 
are specific to Government systems, and thus have been difficult for 
contractors to implement with their own already-existing systems. This 
has also limited some businesses from competing for Federal contracts. 
Non-Federal systems are often built using different processes from the 
Government-specific ones outlined in the NIST guidelines, even while 
achieving the same standard of protection as set forth in the Federal 
Information Processing Standards (FIPS). NARA has therefore partnered 
with NIST to develop a special publication on applying the information 
systems security requirements in the contractor environment. Doing so 
should make it easier for businesses to comply with the standards using 
the systems they already have in place, rather than trying to use the 
Government-specific approaches currently described. This publication 
has already undergone one round of public comment as NIST SP-800-171 
and is undergoing a second round of public comment until May 12, 2015; 
we expect to finalize it in June 2015.
    The CUI Executive Agent is also planning a single Federal 
Acquisitions Regulation (FAR) clause that will apply the requirements 
of the proposed rule to the contractor environment and further promote 
standardization to benefit a substantial number of businesses, 
including small entities that may be struggling to meet the current 
range and type of contract clauses. In the process of this three-part 
plan (rule, NIST publication, standard FAR clause), businesses will not 
only receive streamlined and uniform requirements for any unclassified 
information security needs, but will have information systems 
requirements tailored to contractor systems, allowing the businesses to 
help develop the requirements and to be in compliance with Federal 
uniform standards with less difficulty than currently. Businesses that 
currently meet all standards will have a clearer and easier time doing 
so in the future with virtually no negative impact, and businesses that 
do not currently meet standards will be able to bring themselves into 
compliance more easily as well, thus reducing the potential impact 
coming into compliance would have on them.
    Despite all of this, there may still be a significant impact on 
small businesses, related to bringing themselves into compliance with 
existing standards that will be applied uniformly under this rule. NARA 
does not have data on how many small businesses may be impacted by this 
rule, or to what degree, because such information on compliance with 
the standards involved is not tracked for small businesses. NARA 
therefore opens this topic for input from small businesses during the 
public comment period.

Review Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et 
seq.)

    This proposed rule does not contain any information collection 
requirements subject to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

Review Under Executive Order 13132, Federalism, 64 FR 43255 (August 4, 
1999)

    Review under Executive Order 13132 requires that agencies review 
regulations for Federalism effects on the institutional interest of 
states and local governments, and, if the effects are sufficiently 
substantial, prepare a Federal assessment to assist senior policy 
makers. This proposed rule will not have any direct effects on State 
and local governments within the meaning of the Executive Order. 
Therefore, no Federalism assessment is required.

List of Subjects in 32 CFR Part 2002

    Administrative practice and procedure, Archives and records, 
Controlled unclassified information, Freedom of information, Government 
in the Sunshine Act, Information, Information security, National 
security information, Open government, Privacy.

    For the reasons stated in the preamble, NARA proposes to amend 32 
CFR, Chapter XX, by adding part 2002 to read as follows:

PART 2002--CONTROLLED UNCLASSIFIED INFORMATION (CUI)

Subpart A--General Information
Sec.
2002.1 Purpose and scope.
2002.2 Definitions.
2002.3 CUI Executive Agent.
2002.4 Roles and responsibilities.
Subpart B--Key Elements of the CUI Program
2002.10 The CUI Registry.
2002.11 CUI categories and subcategories.
2002.12 Safeguarding.
2002.13 Accessing and disseminating.
2002.14 Decontrolling.
2002.15 Marking.
2002.16 Waivers of CUI requirements in exigent circumstances.
2002.17 Limitations on applicability of agency CUI policies.
Subpart C--CUI Program Management
2002.20 Education and training.
2002.21 Agency self-inspection program.
2002.22 Challenges to designation of information as CUI.
2002.23 Dispute resolution.
2002.24 Misuse of CUI.
2002.25 Sanctions for misuse of CUI.
2002.26 Transfer of records.
2002.27 CUI and the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).
2002.28 CUI and the Privacy Act.

    Authority:  E.O. 13556, 75 FR 68675, 3 CFR, 2010 Comp., pp. 267-
270.

Subpart A--General Information


Sec.  2002.1  Purpose and scope.

    (a) This part describes the executive branch's Controlled 
Unclassified Information (CUI) Program (the CUI Program) and 
establishes policy for designating, handling, and decontrolling 
information that qualifies as CUI.
    (b) The CUI Program standardizes the way the executive branch 
handles sensitive information that requires protection under laws, 
regulations, or Government-wide policies, but that does not qualify as 
classified under Executive Order 13526, Classified National Security 
Information, December 29, 2009 (3 CFR, 2010 Comp., p. 298), or the 
Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (42 U.S.C. 2011, et seq.), as amended.
    (c) Prior to the CUI Program, agencies often employed ad hoc, 
agency-specific policies, procedures, and markings to handle this 
information. This patchwork approach caused agencies to mark and handle 
information inconsistently, implement unclear or unnecessarily 
restrictive disseminating policies, and create obstacles to sharing 
information.
    (d) An executive branch-wide CUI policy balances the need to 
safeguard CUI with the public interest in sharing information 
appropriately and without unnecessary burdens.
    (e) This part applies to all executive branch agencies that 
designate or handle information that meets the standards for CUI. This 
part also applies, by extension, to agency practices involving non-
executive branch CUI recipients, as follows:
    (1) Contractors handling CUI for an agency. Executive branch 
agencies must

[[Page 26504]]

include a requirement to comply with Executive Order 13556, Controlled 
Unclassified Information, November 4, 2010 (3 CFR, 2011 Comp., p. 267) 
(the Order), and this part in all contracts that require a contractor 
to handle CUI for the agency. The contractual requirement must be 
consistent with standards prescribed by the CUI Executive Agent.
    (2) Other non-executive branch entities. When feasible, executive 
branch agencies should enter formal information-sharing agreements and 
include a requirement that any non-executive branch party to the 
agreement comply with the Order, this part, and the CUI Registry. When 
an agency's mission requires it to disseminate CUI without entering 
into an information-sharing agreement, the agency must communicate to 
the recipient that because of the sensitive nature of the information, 
the Government strongly encourages the non-executive branch entity to 
protect CUI consistent with the Order, this part, and the CUI Registry.
    (f) This part rescinds Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI) 
Office Notice 2011-01: Initial Implementation Guidance for Executive 
Order 13556 (June 9, 2011).
    (g) This part creates no right or benefit, substantive or 
procedural, enforceable by law or in equity by any party against the 
United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, 
employees, or agents, or any other person.
    (h) Nothing in this part alters, limits, or supersedes a 
requirement stated in laws, regulations, or Government-wide policies. 
Where laws, regulations, or Government-wide policies articulate the 
requirements for protection of unclassified information, this part 
accommodates and recognizes those requirements as ``CUI Specified.'' 
However, where agency-specific policy or ad hoc practices articulate 
requirements for protection of unclassified information, the CUI 
Executive Agent has the authority under the Order to establish control 
policy. In such cases, this part would override such agency-specific or 
ad hoc requirements if they are in conflict.


Sec.  2002.2  Definitions.

    Agency includes any ``executive agency,'' as defined in 5 U.S.C. 
105; the United States Postal Service; and any other independent entity 
within the executive branch that designates or handles CUI.
    Authorized holder is an individual, organization, or group of users 
that is permitted to designate or handle CUI, consistent with this 
part.
    Classified information is information that Executive Order 13526, 
``Classified National Security Information,'' December 29, 2009 (3 CFR, 
2010 Comp., p. 298), or the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, 
requires to have classified markings and protection against 
unauthorized disclosure.
    Controlled environment is any area or space an authorized holder 
deems to have adequate physical or procedural controls (e.g., barriers 
and managed access controls) to protect CUI from unauthorized access or 
disclosure.
    Control level is a general term that encompasses the category or 
subcategory of specific CUI, along with any specific safeguarding and 
disseminating requirements.
    Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI) is information that laws, 
regulations, or Government-wide policies require to have safeguarding 
or dissemination controls, excluding classified information (see 
definition of classified information, above).
    CUI Basic is the default, uniform set of standards for handling all 
categories and subcategories of CUI. CUI Basic differs from CUI 
Specified in that, although laws, regulations, or Government-wide 
policies establish the CUI Basic information as protected, it does not 
specifically spell out any handling standards for that information. The 
CUI Basic standards therefore apply whenever CUI Specified standards do 
not cover the involved CUI.
    CUI categories and subcategories are those types of information for 
which laws, regulations, or Government-wide policies requires 
safeguarding or dissemination controls, and which the CUI Executive 
Agent has approved and listed in the CUI Registry.
    CUI category or subcategory markings are the markings approved by 
the CUI Executive Agent for the categories and subcategories listed in 
the CUI Registry.
    CUI Executive Agent is the National Archives and Records 
Administration (NARA), which implements the executive branch-wide CUI 
Program and oversees Federal agency actions to comply with the Order. 
NARA has delegated this authority to the Director of the Information 
Security Oversight Office (ISOO).
    CUI Program is the executive branch-wide program to standardize CUI 
handling by all Federal agencies. The Program includes the rules, 
organization, and procedures for CUI, established by the Order, this 
part, and the CUI Registry.
    CUI Program manager is an agency official, designated by the agency 
head or CUI senior agency official, to serve as the official 
representative to the CUI Executive Agent on the agency's day-to-day 
CUI Program operations, both within the agency and in interagency 
contexts.
    CUI Registry is the online repository for all information, 
guidance, policy, and requirements on handling CUI, including 
everything issued by the CUI Executive Agent other than this part. 
Agencies and authorized holders must follow the requirements in the CUI 
Registry. Among other information, the CUI Registry identifies all 
approved CUI categories and subcategories, provides general 
descriptions for each, identifies the basis for controls, and sets out 
handling procedures.
    CUI senior agency official is a senior official designated in 
writing by an agency head and responsible to that agency head for 
implementation of the CUI Program within that agency. The CUI senior 
agency official is the primary point of contact for official 
correspondence, accountability reporting, and other matters of record 
between the agency and the CUI Executive Agent.
    CUI Specified are the sets of standards that apply to CUI 
categories and subcategories that have specific handling standards 
required or permitted by authorizing laws, regulations, or Government-
wide policies. Only CUI categories and subcategories the CUI Executive 
Agent approves and designates in the CUI Registry as CUI Specified may 
use the specified standards rather than CUI Basic standards. Agencies 
must apply CUI Basic standards to all CUI that is not included in a CUI 
Specified category in the Registry, or when a CUI Specified authority 
is silent on any aspect of handling the involved CUI. CUI Specified 
standards may be more stringent than, or may simply differ from, those 
required by CUI Basic; the distinction is that the underlying authority 
spells out the standards for CUI Specified categories and does not for 
CUI Basic ones.
    Decontrolling occurs when an agency removes safeguarding or 
dissemination controls from CUI that no longer requires such controls.
    Designating occurs when an authorized holder determines that a CUI 
category or subcategory covers a specific item of information and then 
marks that item as CUI.
    Designating agency is the executive branch agency that designates a 
specific item of information as CUI.
    Disseminating occurs when authorized holders transmit, transfer, or 
provide access to CUI to other authorized holders through any means.

[[Page 26505]]

    Document means any tangible thing, which constitutes or contains 
information, and means the original and any copies (whether different 
from the originals because of notes made on such copies or otherwise) 
of all writings of every kind and description over which an agency has 
authority, whether inscribed by hand or by mechanical, facsimile, 
electronic, magnetic, microfilm, photographic, or other means, as well 
as phonic or visual reproductions or oral statements, conversations, or 
events, and including, but not limited to: Correspondence, email, 
notes, reports, papers, files, manuals, books, pamphlets, periodicals, 
letters, memoranda, notations, messages, telegrams, cables, facsimiles, 
records, studies, working papers, accounting papers, computer disks, 
computer tapes, telephone logs, computer mail, computer printouts, 
worksheets, sent or received communications of any kind, teletype 
messages, agreements, diary entries, calendars and journals, printouts, 
drafts, tables, compilations, tabulations, recommendations, accounts, 
work papers, summaries, address books, other records and recordings or 
transcriptions of conferences, meetings, visits, interviews, 
discussions, or telephone conversations, charts, graphs, indexes, 
tapes, minutes, contracts, leases, invoices, records of purchase or 
sale correspondence, electronic or other transcription of taping of 
personal conversations or conferences, and any written, printed, typed, 
punched, taped, filmed, or graphic matter however produced or 
reproduced. Document also includes the file, folder, exhibits, and 
containers, and the labels on them, associated with each original or 
copy. Document also includes voice records, film, tapes, video tapes, 
email, personal computer files, electronic matter, and other data 
compilations from which information can be obtained, including 
materials used in data processing.
    Handling is any use of CUI, including but not limited to marking, 
safeguarding, transporting, disseminating, re-using, and disposing of 
the information.
    Lawful Government purpose is any activity, mission, function, 
operation, or endeavor that the U.S. Government authorizes or 
recognizes within the scope of its legal authorities.
    Legacy material is unclassified information that was marked or 
otherwise controlled prior to implementation of the CUI Program.
    Limited dissemination is any type of control on disseminating CUI 
approved for use by the CUI Executive Agent.
    Misuse of CUI occurs when someone uses CUI in a manner inconsistent 
with the policy contained in the Order, this part, and the CUI 
Registry, or any of the laws, regulations, and Government-wide policy 
that establish CUI categories and subcategories. This may include 
intentional violations or unintentional errors in safeguarding or 
disseminating CUI.
    Non-executive branch entity is a person or organization 
established, operated, and controlled by individual(s) acting outside 
the scope of any official capacity as officers, employees, or agents of 
the executive branch of the Federal Government. Such entities may 
include elements of the legislative or judicial branches of the Federal 
government; State, interstate, Tribal, local, or foreign government 
elements; and private or international organizations, including 
contractors and vendors.
    Portion is ordinarily a section within a document, and may include 
subjects, titles, graphics, tables, charts, bullet statements, sub-
paragraphs, bullets points, or other sections, including those within 
slide presentations.
    Protection includes all controls an agency applies or must apply 
when handling information that qualifies as CUI.
    Public release occurs when an agency makes information formerly 
designated as CUI available to members of the public through the 
agency's official release processes. Disseminating CUI to non-executive 
branch entities as authorized does not constitute public release; nor 
does releasing information to an individual pursuant to the Privacy Act 
of 1974.
    Records are agency records and Presidential papers or Presidential 
records (or Vice-Presidential), as those terms are defined in 44 U.S.C. 
3301 and 44 U.S.C. 2201 and 2207. Records also include such items 
created or maintained by a Government contractor, licensee, certificate 
holder, or grantee that are subject to the sponsoring agency's control 
under the terms of the contract, license, certificate, or grant.
    Re-use means incorporating, disseminating, restating, or 
paraphrasing CUI from its originally designated form into a newly 
created document.
    Self-inspection is an agency's internally managed review and 
evaluation of its activities to implement the CUI Program.
    Unauthorized disclosure occurs when individuals or entities that do 
not have a lawful Government purpose to access the CUI gain access to 
it. Unauthorized disclosure may be intentional or unintentional.
    Uncontrolled unclassified information is information that neither 
the Order nor classified information authorities cover as protected. 
Although this information is not controlled or classified, agencies 
must still handle it consistently with Federal Information Security 
Modernization Act (FISMA) requirements.
    Working papers are documents or materials, regardless of form, that 
an agency or user expects to revise prior to creating a finished 
product.


Sec.  2002.3  CUI Executive Agent.

    (a) Section 2(c) of the Order designates NARA as the CUI Executive 
Agent to implement this Order and to oversee agency efforts to comply 
with the Order, this part, and the CUI Registry.
    (b) NARA's Director of the Information Security Oversight Office 
(ISOO) performs the duties assigned to NARA as the CUI Executive Agent.


Sec.  2002.4  Roles and responsibilities.

    (a) The CUI Executive Agent:
    (1) Develops and issues policy, guidance, and other materials, as 
needed, to implement the Order and this part, and to establish and 
maintain the CUI Program.
    (2) Consults with affected agencies, State, local, Tribal, and 
private sector partners, and representatives of the public on matters 
pertaining to CUI.
    (3) Establishes, convenes, and chairs the CUI Advisory Council (the 
Council) to address matters pertaining to the CUI Program. The CUI 
Executive Agent consults with affected agencies to develop and document 
the Council's structure and procedures, and submits the details to OMB 
for approval.
    (4) Reviews and approves agency policies implementing this part 
before agencies issue them to ensure their consistency with the Order, 
this part, and the CUI Registry.
    (5) Reviews, evaluates, and oversees agencies' actions to implement 
the CUI Program, to ensure compliance with the Order, this part, and 
the CUI Registry.
    (6) Establishes a management and planning framework, including 
associated deadlines for phased implementation, based on agency 
compliance plans submitted pursuant to section 5(b) of the Order, and 
in consultation with affected agencies and the Office of Management and 
Budget (OMB).
    (7) Approves categories and subcategories of CUI as needed and 
publishes them in the CUI Registry.
    (8) Prescribes standards, procedures, guidance, and instructions 
for oversight

[[Page 26506]]

and agency self-inspection programs, to include performing on-site 
inspections.
    (9) Standardizes forms and procedures to implement the CUI Program.
    (10) Considers and resolves, as appropriate, disputes, complaints, 
and suggestions about the CUI Program from entities in or outside the 
Government; and
    (11) Reports to the President on implementation of the Order and 
the requirements of this part. This includes publishing a report on the 
status of agency implementation at least biennially, or more frequently 
at the discretion of the CUI Executive Agent.
    (b) Agency heads:
    (1) Ensure agency senior leadership support, and make adequate 
resources available to implement, manage, and comply with the CUI 
Program as administered by the CUI Executive Agent.
    (2) Designate a CUI senior agency official responsible for ensuring 
agency implementation, management, and oversight of the CUI Program.
    (3) Approve agency policies, as required, to implement the CUI 
Program.
    (c) CUI senior agency officials:
    (1) Must be at the Senior Executive Service level or equivalent;
    (2) Direct and oversee the agency's CUI Program;
    (3) Designate a CUI Program manager;
    (4) Ensure the agency has CUI implementing policies and plans, as 
needed;
    (5) Implement an education and training program pursuant to Sec.  
2002.20 of this part;
    (6) Upon request of the CUI Executive Agent under section 5(c) of 
the Order, provide an update of CUI implementation efforts for 
subsequent reporting;
    (7) Develop and implement the agency's self-inspection program;
    (8) Establish a process to accept and manage challenges to CUI 
status, consistent with existing processes based in laws, regulations, 
and Government-wide policies; and
    (9) Establish processes and criteria for reporting and 
investigating misuse of CUI.
    (d) The Director of National Intelligence: After consultation with 
the heads of affected agencies and the Director of the Information 
Security Oversight Office, may issue directives to implement this part 
with respect to the protection of intelligence sources, methods, and 
activities. Such directives must be consistent with the Order, this 
part, and the CUI Registry.

Subpart B--Key Elements of the CUI Program


Sec.  2002.10  The CUI Registry.

    (a) The CUI Executive Agent maintains the CUI Registry, which 
serves as the central repository for all information, guidance, policy, 
and requirements on handling CUI, including authorized CUI categories 
and subcategories, associated markings, and applicable decontrolling 
procedures.
    (b) The CUI Registry:
    (1) Is the sole authoritative repository for information on CUI 
except the Order and this part;
    (2) Is publicly accessible;
    (3) Includes citation(s) to laws, regulations, or Government-wide 
policies that form the basis for each category and subcategory; and
    (4) Notes any sanctions or penalties for misuse of each category or 
subcategory of CUI that are included in applicable statutes or 
regulations.


Sec.  2002.11  CUI categories and subcategories.

    (a) CUI categories and subcategories are the exclusive means of 
designating CUI throughout the executive branch. They identify 
unclassified information that requires safeguarding or dissemination 
controls, pursuant to and consistent with applicable laws, regulations, 
and Government-wide policies. Agencies may not control any unclassified 
information outside of the CUI Program.
    (b) Agencies must designate CUI only by use of a category or 
subcategory approved by the CUI Executive Agent and published in the 
CUI Registry.


Sec.  2002.12  Safeguarding.

    (a) General safeguarding policy. (1) Agencies must safeguard CUI at 
all times in a manner that minimizes the risk of unauthorized 
disclosure while allowing for access by authorized holders.
    (2) Agency personnel must comply with policy in the Order, this 
part, and the CUI Registry, and review their agency's CUI policies for 
additional instructions. For categories designated as CUI Specified, 
employees must also follow the procedures in the underlying laws, 
regulations, or Government-wide policies that established the specific 
category or subcategory involved.
    (3) Safeguarding measures that are authorized or accredited for 
classified information are also sufficient for safeguarding CUI.
    (4) Pursuant to the Order and this part, and in consultation with 
affected agencies, the CUI Executive Agent issues safeguarding 
standards in the CUI Registry, and updates them as needed.
    (b) CUI safeguarding standards. Agencies must safeguard CUI using 
one of two types of standards:
    (1) CUI Basic. CUI Basic is the default set of standards agencies 
must apply to all CUI unless the CUI Registry annotates the relevant 
information as CUI Specified.
    (2) CUI Specified. (i) Agencies safeguard CUI using CUI Specified 
standards only when the involved information falls into a category or 
subcategory designated in the CUI Registry as CUI Specified. In such 
cases, agencies should apply the specified set of standards required by 
the underlying authorities, as indicated in the CUI Registry.
    (ii) When the authorizing laws, regulations, or Government-wide 
policies for a specific CUI Specified category or subcategory is silent 
on a safeguarding or disseminating requirement, agencies must handle 
that requirement using the CUI Basic standards, unless this results in 
any treatment that is inconsistent with the CUI Specified authority. If 
such a conflict occurs, agencies follow the CUI Specified authority's 
requirements.
    (c) Protecting CUI under the control of an authorized holder. (1) 
Authorized holders must have access to controlled environments in which 
to protect CUI from unauthorized access or observation.
    (2) When discussing CUI, you must reasonably ensure that 
unauthorized individuals cannot overhear the conversation.
    (3) When outside a controlled environment, you must keep the CUI 
under your direct control or protect it with at least one physical 
barrier. You or the physical barrier must reasonably protect the CUI 
from unauthorized access or observation.
    (4) Agencies must protect the confidentiality of CUI that is 
processed, stored, or transmitted on Federal information systems 
consistently with the security requirements and controls established in 
FIPS Publication 199, FIPS Publication 200, and NIST SP 800-53.
    (d) Protecting CUI not under control of an authorized holder. (1) 
You may use the United States Postal Service or any commercial delivery 
service when you need to transport or deliver CUI to another 
organization.
    (2) We encourage you to use in-transit automated tracking and 
accountability tools when you send CUI.
    (3) You may use interoffice or interagency mail systems to 
transport CUI.
    (4) Mark packages that contain CUI to indicate that they are 
intended for the

[[Page 26507]]

recipient only and should not be forwarded.
    (5) Do not put CUI markings on the outside of an envelope or 
package.
    (e) Reproducing CUI. (1) You may reproduce (e.g., copy, scan, 
print, electronically duplicate) CUI in furtherance of a lawful 
Government purpose.
    (2) When reproducing CUI documents on equipment such as printers, 
copiers, scanners, or fax machines, you must ensure that the equipment 
does not retain data or you must otherwise sanitize it in accordance 
with NIST SP 800-53.
    (f) Destroying CUI. (1) You may destroy CUI when:
    (i) Your agency no longer needs the information; and
    (ii) Records disposition schedules published or approved by NARA or 
other applicable laws, regulations, or Government-wide policies no 
longer require your agency to retain the records.
    (2) When destroying CUI, including in electronic form, you must do 
so in a manner that makes it unreadable, indecipherable, and 
irrecoverable, using any of the following:
    (i) Guidance for destruction in NIST SP 800-53, Security and 
Privacy Controls for Federal Information Systems and Organizations, and 
NIST SP 800-88, Guidelines for Media Sanitization;
    (ii) Any method of destruction approved for Classified National 
Security Information, as delineated in 32 CFR 2001.47, Destruction, or 
any implementing or successor guidance; or
    (iii) Any specific destruction methods required by laws, 
regulations, or Government-wide policies for that item.
    (g) Information systems that process, store, or transmit CUI.
    (1) Agencies must apply information system requirements to CUI that 
are consistent with already-required NIST standards and guidelines and 
OMB policies. The Federal Information Security Modernization Act 
(FISMA) of 2014, 44 U.S.C. 3541, et seq., requires all Federal agencies 
to apply the standards in FIPS Publication 199 and FIPS Publication 
200. FIPS Publication 200 and OMB Memorandum-14-04, November 18, 2013, 
require all Federal agencies to also apply the appropriate security 
requirements and controls from NIST SP 800-53. All three sets of 
publications are free and available from the NIST Web site at http://www.nist.gov/publication-portal.cfm.
    (2) Consistent with this already-established framework governing 
all Federal information systems, CUI is categorized at the moderate 
confidentiality impact level in accordance with FIPS Publication 199. 
Likewise, agencies must also apply the appropriate security 
requirements and controls from FIPS Publication 200 and NIST SP 800-53 
consistently with any risk-based tailoring decisions. Agencies may 
increase the confidentiality impact level above moderate and apply 
additional security requirements and controls only internally; they may 
not require anyone outside the agency to use a higher impact level or 
more stringent security requirements and controls.


Sec.  2002.13  Accessing and disseminating.

    (a) General policy. (1) Agencies should disseminate and permit 
access to CUI, provided such access or dissemination:
    (i) Abides by the laws, regulations, or Government-wide policies 
that established the CUI category or subcategory;
    (ii) Furthers a lawful Government purpose;
    (iii) Is not restricted by an authorized limited dissemination 
control established by the CUI Executive Agent; and,
    (iv) Is not otherwise prohibited by law.
    (2) Agencies should impose controls only as necessary to abide by 
restrictions on access to CUI. Agencies may not impose controls that 
unlawfully or improperly restrict access to CUI.
    (3) Prior to disseminating CUI, you must mark CUI according to 
marking guidance issued by the CUI Executive Agent.
    (4) Non-executive branch entities may receive CUI directly from 
members of the executive branch or as sub-recipients from other non-
executive branch entities.
    (5) In order to disseminate CUI to a non-executive branch entity, 
you must have a reasonable expectation that the recipient will continue 
to control the information in accordance with the Order, this part, and 
the CUI Registry.
    (6) When feasible, agencies should enter into a written agreement 
with any intended non-executive branch entity. At a minimum, such 
agreements must specify that:
    (i) CUI remains under the legal control of the Federal Government 
and its misuse is subject to penalties permitted under applicable laws, 
regulations, or Government-wide policies;
    (ii) Non-executive branch entities must handle CUI consistently 
with the Order, this part, and the CUI Registry; and
    (iii) The non-executive branch entity must report any non-
compliance with handling requirements to the disseminating agency's CUI 
senior agency official. When the disseminating agency is not the 
designating agency, the disseminating agency must notify the 
designating agency.
    (b) Controls on accessing and disseminating CUI--(1) CUI Basic. You 
should disseminate and encourage access to CUI Basic for any recipient 
when it meets the requirements set out in paragraph (a)(1) of this 
section.
    (2) CUI Specified. You may disseminate and allow access to CUI 
Specified as permitted by the authorizing laws, regulations, or 
Government-wide policies that established that category or subcategory 
of CUI Specified.
    (i) The CUI Registry annotates CUI categories and subcategories 
that contain Specified controls.
    (ii) In the absence of specific dissemination restrictions, 
agencies may disseminate and allow access to the CUI as they would for 
CUI Basic.
    (3) Limited dissemination. (i) You may place limits on 
disseminating CUI only through the use of limited dissemination 
controls approved by the CUI Executive Agent and published in the CUI 
Registry.
    (ii) Use of limited dissemination controls to unnecessarily 
restrict access to CUI is contrary to the stated goals of the CUI 
Program. You may therefore use these controls only when it serves a 
lawful Government purpose, or you are required by laws, regulations, or 
Government-wide policies to do so.
    (iii) You may apply limited dissemination controls to any CUI that 
is required or permitted to have restricted access by or to certain 
entities.
    (iv) You may combine the approved limited dissemination controls 
listed in the CUI Registry to accommodate necessary practices.
    (c) Methods of disseminating CUI. (1) Before disseminating CUI, you 
must reasonably expect that all intended recipients are authorized to 
receive the CUI. You may then disseminate the CUI by any method that 
meets the safeguarding requirements of this part and ensures receipt in 
a timely fashion, unless the laws, regulations, or Government-wide 
policies that govern that category or subcategory of CUI requires 
otherwise.
    (2) To disseminate CUI using systems or components that are subject 
to NIST guidelines and publications (e.g., email applications, text 
messaging, facsimile, or voicemail), you must do so consistently with 
the moderate confidentiality value set out in the

[[Page 26508]]

FISMA-mandated FIPS Publication 199, FIPS Publication 200, and NIST SP 
800-53.


Sec.  2002.14  Decontrolling.

    (a) Agencies may decontrol CUI that they have designated:
    (1) When laws, regulations or Government-wide policies no longer 
require its control as CUI;
    (2) In response to a request by an authorized holder to decontrol 
it, if the agency is the designating agency;
    (3) When the designating agency decides to release it to the public 
by making an affirmative, proactive disclosure;
    (4) When the agency releases it in accordance with an applicable 
information access statute, such as the Freedom of Information Act 
(FOIA);
    (5) Consistent with any declassification action under Executive 
Order 13526 or any predecessor or successor order; or
    (6) When a pre-determined event or date occurs, as described in the 
decontrol indicators section of this part.
    (b) Decontrolling may occur automatically upon the occurrence of 
one of the conditions in paragraph (a) of this section, or through an 
affirmative decision by the designating agency.
    (c) Only personnel that an agency authorizes may decontrol CUI.
    (d) Decontrolling CUI relieves authorized holders from requirements 
to handle the information under the CUI Program, but does not 
constitute authorization for public release.
    (e) Agencies should decontrol any CUI designated by their agency 
that no longer requires CUI controls as soon as practicable.
    (f) You must remove or strike through with a single straight line 
all CUI markings when restating, paraphrasing, re-using, releasing to 
the public, or donating CUI to a private institution. Otherwise, you 
are not required to mark, review, or take other actions to indicate the 
CUI is no longer controlled.
    (1) Agencies may establish policy that allows holders to remove or 
strike through only those markings on the first or cover page of the 
CUI.
    (2) If you use the decontrolled CUI in a newly created document, 
you must remove all CUI markings for the decontrolled information.
    (g) Once decontrolled, any public release of information that was 
formerly CUI must be in accordance with existing agency policies on the 
public release of information.
    (h) You may request that the designating agency decontrol certain 
CUI. Agency heads or the CUI senior agency official must establish 
processes for handling CUI decontrol requests submitted by authorized 
holders.
    (i) If an authorized holder publicly releases CUI in accordance 
with the designating agency's authorized procedures, the release 
constitutes decontrol of the information.
    (j) Unauthorized disclosure of CUI does not constitute decontrol.
    (k) You must not decontrol CUI in an attempt to conceal, 
circumvent, or mitigate an identified unauthorized disclosure.
    (l) When laws, regulations, and Government-wide policies require 
specific decontrol procedures, you must follow such requirements.
    (m) The Archivist of the United States may decontrol records 
transferred to the National Archives in accordance with Sec.  2002.26 
of this part, absent a specific agreement otherwise with the 
originating agency. The Archivist decontrols records to facilitate 
public access pursuant to 44 U.S.C. 2108 and NARA's regulations at 36 
CFR parts 1235, 1250, and 1256.


Sec.  2002.15  Marking.

    (a) General marking policy. (1) CUI markings listed in the CUI 
Registry are the only control markings authorized to designate 
unclassified information requiring safeguarding or dissemination 
controls. You must mark CUI exclusively in accordance with this part 
and the CUI Registry.
    (2) You must uniformly and conspicuously apply CUI markings to all 
CUI prior to disseminating it unless otherwise specifically permitted 
by the CUI Executive Agent or as provided below.
    (3) The CUI Program prohibits using markings or practices not 
included in this part or the CUI Registry. Agencies must take active 
measures to discontinue use of any other markings, in accordance with 
guidance from the CUI Executive Agent. Agencies may not modify CUI 
Program markings or deviate from the method of use prescribed by the 
CUI Executive Agent in an effort to accommodate existing agency marking 
practices, except in extraordinary circumstances approved by the CUI 
Executive Agent.
    (4) The designating agency determines that the information 
qualifies for CUI status and applies the appropriate CUI marking at the 
time of designation.
    (5) You must not mark information as CUI to conceal illegality, 
negligence, ineptitude, or other disreputable circumstances 
embarrassing to any person, any agency, the Federal Government, or any 
partners thereof.
    (6) The CUI Program does not require agencies to redact or re-mark 
documents that bear legacy markings. However, agencies must mark as CUI 
any information they derive from such documents and re-use in a new 
document, if the information qualifies as CUI.
    (7) When marking is excessively burdensome, an agency's CUI senior 
agency official may approve waivers of all or some of the marking 
requirements for CUI designated within that agency. However, all CUI 
must be marked when disseminated outside of that agency.
    (i) When CUI senior agency officials grant such waivers, they must 
still ensure that the agency appropriately safeguards and disseminates 
the CUI.
    (ii) The CUI senior agency official must detail in each waiver the 
alternate protection methods the agency must employ to ensure 
protection of the CUI in question.
    (iii) All such waivers apply to CUI only while in possession of 
employees of that agency.
    (8) The lack of a CUI marking on information does not exempt the 
information from applicable handling requirements set forth in laws, 
regulations, or Government-wide policies.
    (b) The CUI banner marking. You must mark all CUI with a CUI banner 
marking, which may include up to three elements:
    (1) The CUI control marking (mandatory). (i) The CUI control 
marking may consist of either the word ``CONTROLLED'' or the acronym 
``CUI'' (at the designator's discretion). You may not use alternative 
markings to identify or mark items as CUI.
    (ii) If you include in the banner marking other authorized CUI 
markings in addition to the CUI control marking (as set out below), 
separate those elements from the CUI control marking by a single slash 
(``/'').
    (2) CUI category and subcategory markings (mandatory for CUI 
Specified). (i) The CUI Registry lists the category and subcategory 
markings, which align with the CUI's designated category or 
subcategory.
    (ii) The CUI senior agency official may approve optional use of CUI 
category and subcategory markings for CUI Basic, through agency policy. 
The policy may also address whether to include these markings in the 
CUI banner marking. When the CUI senior agency official has approved 
CUI Basic category or subcategory markings through agency policy, you 
may include those markings in the CUI banner marking when multiple 
categories or subcategories are present.
    (iii) You must use CUI category and subcategory markings for CUI 
Specified.

[[Page 26509]]

If laws, regulations, or Government-wide policies require specific 
marking, disseminating, informing, or warning statements, you must use 
those indicators as required by those authorities. However, you must 
not include these additional indicators in the CUI banner marking or 
portion markings.
    (iv) Include in the CUI banner marking all CUI Specified category 
or subcategory markings; other category or subcategory markings that 
may apply are optional.
    (v) List category or subcategory markings in alphabetical order, 
using the approved abbreviations listed in the CUI Registry, and 
separate multiple categories or subcategories from each other by a 
single slash (``/'').
    (3) Limited dissemination control markings. (i) CUI limited 
dissemination control markings align with limited dissemination 
controls established under Sec.  2002.13(b)(3) of this part.
    (ii) Designating agencies must establish agency policy that 
includes specific criteria for when, and by whom, they will allow the 
use of limited dissemination controls and control markings, and ensure 
the policy aligns with the requirements in Sec.  2002.13(b)(3) of this 
part.
    (iii) In accordance with its policy, the designating agency may 
apply limited dissemination control markings when it designates 
information as CUI and may approve later requests by authorized holders 
to apply them. Authorized holders may apply limited dissemination 
control markings only with the approval of the designating agency.
    (iv) When including limited dissemination control markings in the 
CUI banner marking, use a double slash (``//'') to separate them from 
the previous element of the CUI banner marking (e.g. ``CUI//NOFORN'' or 
``CONTROLLED/LEI//NOFORN'').
    (v) List limited dissemination control markings in alphabetical 
order, using the approved abbreviations listed in the CUI Registry, and 
separate them from each other by a single slash (``/'').
    (c) Using the CUI banner marking. (1) The content of the CUI banner 
marking must apply to the whole document (e.g., inclusive of all CUI 
within the document) and must be the same on every page on which you 
use it.
    (2) The CUI banner marking must appear, at a minimum, at the top 
center of each page containing CUI.
    (3) For non-document formats, the container or portion of the item 
that is first visible must carry the banner.
    (d) CUI designation indicator (mandatory). (1) All media containing 
CUI must carry an indicator of who designated the CUI within it. This 
should include:
    (i) The designator's agency (at a minimum); and
    (ii) If not otherwise evident, the designating agency or office via 
a ``Controlled by'' line. For example, ``Controlled by: Division 5, 
Department of Good Works.''
    (2) The designation indicator must be readily apparent to 
authorized holders and may appear only on the first page or cover.
    (e) CUI decontrolling indicators. (1) Where feasible, designating 
agencies must include a specific decontrolling date or event with all 
media containing CUI. This may be accomplished in any manner that makes 
the decontrolling schedule readily apparent to an authorized holder.
    (2) When used, decontrolling indicators must use the format: 
``Decontrol On:'' followed by a date or name of a specific event.
    (3) If using a specific decontrolling date, list it in the format 
``YYYYMMDD.''
    (i) Decontrol is presumed at midnight local time on the date 
indicated.
    (ii) Authorized holders may consider specific items of CUI as 
decontrolled as of the date indicated, requiring no further review by, 
or communication with, the designator.
    (4) If using a specific event after which the CUI is considered 
decontrolled:
    (i) The event must be foreseeable and verifiable by any authorized 
holder (e.g., not based on or requiring special access or knowledge);
    (ii) State the event title in bullet format rather than a narrative 
statement; and
    (iii) Include point of contact and preferred method of contact 
information in the decontrol indicator when using this method, to allow 
authorized holders to verify that a specified event has occurred.
    (f) Portion marking CUI. (1) Agencies are permitted and encouraged 
to portion mark all CUI, to facilitate information sharing and proper 
handling.
    (2) You may mark CUI only with portion markings approved by the CUI 
Executive Agent and listed in the CUI Registry.
    (3) CUI portion markings consist of the following elements:
    (i) The CUI control marking, which must be the acronym ``CUI'';
    (ii) CUI category/subcategory portion markings (if required); and
    (iii) CUI limited dissemination control portion markings (if 
required).
    (4) When using portion markings:
    (i) You must indicate CUI portions by placing the required portion 
marking for each portion inside parentheses, immediately before the 
portion to which it applies (e.g. ``(CUI)'' or ``(CUI/LEI//NF).''
    (ii) CUI category and subcategory markings are optional for CUI 
Basic. Agencies should manage their use by means of agency policy.
    (iii) You must portion mark both CUI and uncontrolled unclassified 
portions. Indicate the uncontrolled unclassified portions by using a 
``(U)'' immediately preceding the portion to which it applies.
    (5) In cases where portions consist of several segments, such as 
paragraphs, sub-paragraphs, bullets, and sub-bullets, and the control 
level is the same throughout, you may place a single portion marking at 
the beginning of the primary paragraph or bullet. However, if the 
portion includes different CUI categories or subcategories, you must 
portion mark all segments separately to avoid improper control of any 
one segment.
    (6) Each portion must reflect the control level of that individual 
portion and not any other portions. If the information contained in a 
sub-paragraph or sub-bullet is a different CUI category or subcategory 
from its parent paragraph or parent bullet, this does not make the 
parent paragraph or parent bullet controlled at that same level.
    (g) Commingling CUI markings with classified information. (1) When 
you include CUI in documents that also contain classified information, 
you must make the following changes to the CUI marking scheme:
    (i) Portion mark all CUI to ensure that CUI portions can be 
distinguished from portions containing classified and uncontrolled 
unclassified information;
    (ii) Include CUI Specified category and subcategory markings in the 
overall banner marking;
    (iii) Include the CUI control marking (``CUI'') in the overall 
marking banner directly before the CUI category and subcategory 
markings (e.g., ``CUI/SP-PCII''). This applies only when CUI category 
and subcategory markings are included in the banner;
    (iv) Separate category and subcategory markings from each other by 
a single slash (e.g. ``CUI/SP-PCII/SP-UCNI'');
    (v) Include all CUI limited dissemination controls with each CUI 
portion and in the CUI section of the overall classified marking 
banner, if applicable. Separate limited dissemination markings from 
each other by a single slash (``/''); and

[[Page 26510]]

    (vi) Separate the entire CUI marking string for the CUI banner 
marking from other parts of the overall classified marking banner by 
using a double slash (``//'') on either end. However, if the CUI 
marking string is the final portion of the overall classified marking 
banner, do not use an ending double slash (``//'').
    (2) Commingling restricted data (RD) and formerly restricted data 
(FRD) with CUI. (i) To the extent possible, avoid commingling RD or FRD 
with CUI in the same document. When it is not practicable to avoid such 
commingling, follow the marking requirements in the Order, this part, 
and the CUI Registry, as well as the marking requirements in 10 CFR 
part 1045, Nuclear Classification and Declassification.
    (ii) The decontrolling provisions of the Order do not apply to 
portions marked as containing RD or FRD.
    (iii) Add ``Not Applicable (or N/A) to RD/FRD portions'' to the 
``Decontrol On'' line for commingled documents.
    (iv) Follow the requirements of 10 CFR part 1045 when extracting an 
RD or FRD portion for use in a new document.
    (v) Follow the requirements of the Order, this part, and the CUI 
Registry if extracting a CUI portion for use in a new document.
    (vi) The lack of declassification instructions for RD or FRD 
portions does not eliminate the requirement to process commingled 
documents for declassification in accordance with the Atomic Energy 
Act, or 10 CFR part 1045.
    (h) Transmittal document marking requirements. (1) When a 
transmittal document accompanies CUI, the transmittal document must 
include a CUI marking on its face (``CONTROLLED'' or ``CUI''), 
indicating that CUI is attached or enclosed.
    (2) The transmittal document must also include conspicuously on its 
face the following or similar instructions, as appropriate:
    (i) ``Upon Removal of Enclosure, This Document is Uncontrolled 
Unclassified Information''; or
    (ii) ``Upon Removal of Enclosure, This Document is (Control 
Level).''
    (i) Working papers. Mark working papers containing CUI as required 
for any CUI contained within them and handle them in accordance with 
this part and the CUI Registry.
    (j) Using supplemental administrative markings with CUI. (1) Agency 
heads may authorize the use of supplemental administrative markings 
(e.g. ``Pre-decisional,'' ``Deliberative,'' ``Draft'') for use with 
CUI.
    (2) Agency heads may not authorize the use of supplemental 
administrative markings to establish safeguarding requirements or 
disseminating restrictions, or to designate the information as CUI.
    (3) To be eligible for use with CUI, agencies must detail use and 
requirements for supplemental administrative markings in agency policy 
that is available to anyone who may come into possession of CUI 
carrying these markings.
    (4) Do not incorporate or include supplemental administrative 
markings in the CUI markings.
    (5) Supplemental administrative markings must not duplicate any CUI 
marking described in this part and the CUI Registry.
    (k) Unmarked CUI. Treat unmarked information that qualifies as CUI 
as described in the Order, this part, and the CUI Registry.


Sec.  2002.16  Waivers of CUI requirements in exigent circumstances.

    (a) In exigent circumstances, the agency head or the CUI senior 
agency official may waive the requirements established in this part or 
the CUI Registry for any CUI within the agency's possession or control, 
unless specifically prohibited by applicable laws, regulations, or 
Government-wide policies.
    (b) When the circumstances requiring the waiver end, the agency 
must reinstitute the requirements for all CUI covered by the waiver.


Sec.  2002.17  Limitations on applicability of agency CUI policies.

    (a) Agency policies pertaining to CUI do not apply to entities 
outside that agency unless the CUI Executive Agent approves their 
application and publishes them in the CUI Registry.
    (b) Agencies may not include any requirements on handling CUI other 
than those contained in the Order, this part, or the CUI Registry when 
entering into contracts, treaties, or other agreements with entities 
outside of that agency.

Subpart C--CUI Program Management


Sec.  2002.20  Education and training.

    (a) The agency head or CUI senior agency official must establish 
policies that address the means, methods, and frequency of agency CUI 
training.
    (b) At a minimum, agencies must ensure that personnel who have 
access to CUI receive training on creating CUI, relevant CUI categories 
and subcategories, the CUI Registry, associated markings, and 
applicable safeguarding, disseminating, and decontrolling policies and 
procedures. Agencies must ensure that it trains employees on these 
matters when the employees first begin working for the agency and at 
least once every two years thereafter, at a minimum.
    (c) The CUI Executive Agent may review agency training materials to 
ensure consistency and compliance with the Order, this part, and the 
CUI Registry.


Sec.  2002.21  Agency self-inspection program.

    (a) Agency heads must establish and maintain a self-inspection 
program to ensure compliance with the principles and requirements of 
the Order, this part, and the CUI Registry.
    (b) The self-inspection program must include no less than annual 
periodic review and assessment of the agency's CUI program. The agency 
head or CUI senior agency official should determine frequency based on 
program needs and the degree of designation activity.
    (c) The self-inspection program must include:
    (1) Self-inspection methods, reviews, and assessments that serve to 
evaluate program effectiveness, measure the level of compliance, and 
monitor the progress of CUI implementation;
    (2) Formats for documenting self-inspections and recording 
findings, when not prescribed by the CUI Executive Agent;
    (3) Procedures by which to integrate lessons learned and best 
practices arising from reviews and assessments into operational 
policies, procedures, and training;
    (4) A process for resolving deficiencies and taking corrective 
actions in an accountable manner; and
    (5) Analysis and conclusions from the self-inspection program, 
documented on an annual basis and as requested by the CUI Executive 
Agent.


Sec.  2002.22  Challenges to designation of information as CUI.

    (a) Authorized holders of CUI who, in good faith, believe that its 
designation as CUI is improper or incorrect should notify the 
designating agency of this belief.
    (b) Agency CUI senior agency officials must create a process within 
their agency to accept and manage challenges to CUI status. At a 
minimum, this process must include a timely response to the challenger 
that:
    (1) Acknowledges receipt of the challenge;
    (2) States an expected timetable for response to the challenger;
    (3) Provides an opportunity for the challenger to define their 
rationale for belief that the CUI in question is inappropriately 
designated;
    (4) Gives contact information for the official making the agency's 
decision in this matter; and

[[Page 26511]]

    (5) Ensures that challengers are not subject to retribution for 
bringing such challenges.
    (c) Until the challenge is resolved, continue to safeguard and 
disseminate the challenged CUI at the control level indicated in the 
markings.
    (d) If a challenging party disagrees with the response to their 
challenge, that party may use the Dispute Resolution procedures 
described in Sec.  2002.23 of this part.


Sec.  2002.23  Dispute resolution.

    (a) All parties to a dispute arising from implementation or 
interpretation of the Order, this part, or the CUI Registry should make 
every effort to resolve the dispute expeditiously. Disputes should be 
resolved within a reasonable, mutually acceptable time period, taking 
into consideration the mission, sharing, and protection requirements of 
the parties concerned.
    (b) If parties to a dispute cannot reach a mutually acceptable 
resolution, either party may refer the matter to the CUI Executive 
Agent.
    (c) The CUI Executive Agent is the impartial arbiter of the dispute 
and has the authority to render a decision on the dispute after 
consultation with all affected parties, unless laws, regulations, or 
Government-wide policies otherwise specifically govern requirements for 
the involved category or subcategory of information. If a party to the 
dispute is also a member of the Intelligence Community, the CUI 
Executive Agent must consult with the Office of the Director of 
National Intelligence beginning when the CUI Executive Agent receives 
the dispute for resolution.
    (d) Until the dispute is resolved, continue to safeguard and 
disseminate any disputed CUI at the control level indicated in the 
markings.
    (e) Per section 4(e) of the Order, parties may appeal the CUI 
Executive Agent's decision through the Director of OMB to the President 
for resolution.


Sec.  2002.24  Misuse of CUI.

    (a) CUI senior agency officials establish agency processes and 
criteria for reporting and investigating misuse of CUI.
    (b) The CUI Executive Agent reports findings on any incident 
involving misuse of CUI to the offending agency's CUI senior agency 
official or CUI Program manager for action, as appropriate.


Sec.  2002.25  Sanctions for misuse of CUI.

    (a) To the extent that agency heads are otherwise authorized to 
take administrative action against agency personnel who misuse CUI, 
agency CUI policy governing misuse should reflect that authority.
    (b) Where laws, regulations, or Government-wide policies governing 
certain categories or subcategories of CUI specifically establishes 
sanctions, agencies must adhere to such sanctions.


Sec.  2002.26  Transferring records.

    (a) When feasible, agencies must decontrol records containing CUI 
prior to transferring them to NARA.
    (b) When an agency cannot decontrol records before transferring 
them to NARA, the agency must:
    (1) Indicate on a Transfer Request (TR) in NARA's Electronic 
Records Archives (ERA) or on an SF 258 paper transfer form, that the 
records should continue to be controlled as CUI (subject to NARA's 
regulations on transfer, public availability, and access; see 36 CFR 
parts 1235, 1250, and 1256); and
    (2) For hard copy transfer, place the appropriate CUI marking on 
the outside of the container to indicate that it contains information 
designated as CUI.
    (c) If the agency does not indicate the CUI status on both the 
container and the TR or SF 258, NARA may assume the information was 
decontrolled prior to transfer, regardless of any CUI markings on the 
actual records.


Sec.  2002.27  CUI and the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

    (a) The mere fact that information is designated as CUI has no 
bearing on determinations pursuant to any law requiring the disclosure 
of information or permitting disclosure as a matter of discretion.
    (b) Accordingly, agencies must ensure that:
    (1) They do not cite the FOIA as a CUI safeguarding or 
disseminating control authority for CUI; and
    (2) Agency FOIA reviewers use FOIA release standards and exemptions 
to determine whether or not to release records in response to a FOIA 
request; they do not use CUI markings and designations as a dispositive 
factor in making a FOIA disclosure determination.


Sec.  2002.28  CUI and the Privacy Act.

    The fact that records are subject to the Privacy Act of 1974 does 
not mean that agencies must mark them as CUI. Consult agency guidance 
to determine which records may be subject to the Privacy Act. However, 
information contained in Privacy Act systems of records may be subject 
to controls under other CUI categories or subcategories and the agency 
may need to mark that information as CUI for that reason.

    Dated: April 27, 2015.
David S. Ferriero,
Archivist of the United States.
[FR Doc. 2015-10260 Filed 5-7-15; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 7515-01-P