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Norway’s Anders Breivik: Biological Weapons

Oslo, Norway Below is an except from "NORWAY’S ANDERS BREIVIK: WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION AND THE POLITICS OF CULTURAL DESPAIR," a preliminary analysis written by Charles P. Blair, Kelsey Gregg, & Jonathan Garbose. Please visit the full report for further analysis of the treatise and the CBRN weapons discussed within. Overview Along with other CBRN, Breivik calls for the use of biological weapons (BW) and toxins against the “cultural Marxist/multiculturalist elites,” stressing that “Efforts must be made to obtain [them].”36

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Update: Shoulder-fired Missiles in Somalia

In a recent article on the resurgence of Islamic rebels in Somalia, Associated Press reporter Chris Tomlinson provides new information on the shoulder-fired, surface-to-air missiles allegedly supplied to Somali Islamists last year. Tomlinson claims that the Shabab - the military wing of the Council of Islamic Courts - received 200 shoulder-fired missiles from Eritrea, one of three countries that allegedly shipped missiles to Somalia last year in violation of a long-standing UN arms embargo.

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Special Operations as a Technology Driver

The continuing prominence of special operations as an instrument of U.S. force projection is creating requirements for “revolutionary, game changing” new technologies and fostering the development of solutions…

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FAS Roundup: April 27, 2015

Russia Nuclear Forces, 2015 Currently, Russia is modernizing its strategic and nonstrategic warheads; it currently has 4,500 nuclear warheads and 1,780 are deployed on missiles and bomber bases. Additionally, there are 700 strategic warheads and 2,000 nonstrategic warheads in storage, and an estimated 3,200 retired but largely intact warheads awaiting dismantlement. In the latest Nuclear Notebook, Hans Kristensen and Robert Norris examine Russia's nuclear arsenal and strategy. Despite Russian nuclear threats, they are not building up their arsenal, but appear to be leveling off the force within the next decade. However, there are many uncertainties about the future development of Russian nuclear forces. Available information indicates that Russia is continuing to reduce strategic nuclear launchers well below the limit set by the New START Treaty, and over the next decade all Soviet-era ICBMs will be retired. Depending on the extent of modernization plans over the next decade and how many missiles Russia can actually produce and deploy, the overall strategic force appears to be leveling off just below 500 launchers. Read the FAS Nuclear Notebook here. 

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Chinese Nuclear Weapons Profiled

The Chinese nuclear stockpile appears to be only half as big as previously thought, according to a new overview published in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. Up…

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