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Book: The Secret War with Iran

In 1997, acting on intelligence that a Hizballah cell was preparing to blow up the American embassy in Asuncion, Paraguay, a U.S. special forces team reportedly flew to the scene…

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Missile Watch No. 2: Somalia

CNN and AFP are reporting that the Shabaab, a militant wing of a Somali insurgent group, the Islamic Courts Union (ICU), has threatened to treat “as an enemy…

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A Scenario for Jihadist Nuclear Revenge

by Edward A. Friedman and Roger K. Lewis The Greatest Threat The weapon was ready, a simple fission device similar to the bomb that destroyed Hiroshima. It had been finally…

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DNI Issues New Information Sharing Strategy

A new “Information Sharing Strategy” (pdf) from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence warns that traditional security practices that restrict disclosure of information have become counterproductive. “The…

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FAS Roundup: January 13, 2014

Overview of U.S. nuclear forces, intel implications of virtual worlds, CIA cuts off public access to translated news reports and  more. U.S. Nuclear Forces, 2014 Hans Kristensen and Robert Norris provide an overview of U.S. nuclear forces in 2014 in the latest Nuclear Notebook published in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. The U.S. has an estimated 4,650 nuclear warheads available for delivery by more than 800 ballistic missiles and aircraft. The stockpile includes an estimated 2,130 operational warheads, about 1,150 on submarine-launched ballistic missiles and 470 on intercontinental ballistic missiles. Roughly 300 strategic warheads are located at bomber bases in the United States, and nearly 200 nonstrategic warheads are deployed in Europe, and another 2,530 warheads are in storage. To comply with New START, the U.S. is expected to eliminate land-based missile silos and reduce the number of launch tubes on its missile submarines. Read the Notebook here. 

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