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FAS Roundup – January 28, 2019

The Rise of NGOs: What Cheap and Available Imagery Means for Monitoring and Advocacy FAS’ Pia Ulrich and Christopher Bidwell, along with John Lauder, Harvey…

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FAS Roundup – March 27, 2021

Big Tech CEOs Questioned About Fighting Disinformation With AI by the House Energy and Commerce Committee Last week, Congress asked big tech…

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FAS Roundup – December 16, 2019

Conventional Deterrence of North Korea In a brand new report, Adam Mount explains how rapid technological and doctrinal advancements on both sides of the…

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FAS Roundup: August 10, 2015

From the Blogs Six Achievable Steps for Implementing an Effective Verification Regime for a Nuclear Agreement with Iran: Now that an agreement has been reached between the P5+1 and…

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FAS Roundup: September 15, 2014

From the Blogs New Exemptions from 50 Year Declassification Approved: Most of the national security agencies in the executive branch have now been granted approval to exempt certain 50 year old classified information from automatic declassification. The national security classification system normally requires declassification of classified documents as they become 25 years old, with several specified exemptions to allow continued classification up to 50 years. "Ingenuity" Could Not Prevent Atom Bomb Espionage: When the internal history of the Manhattan Project was written in 1944, officials still believed — mistakenly — that the atom bomb program had evaded the threat of foreign espionage. Although the official history was declassified in July 2014, a single page was inadvertently withheld and recently released. The page presents a flattering view of Manhattan Project counterintelligence efforts, but in reality the skill and ingenuity was inadequate and not up to task, as the Project was penetrated by a number of Soviet intelligence agents and sympathizers.

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FAS Roundup: September 9, 2014

Why NATO Should Eliminate its Tactical Nukes, Despite Russian Belligerence In a new op-ed  published in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Director of the Nuclear Information Project, Hans Kristensen and Adam Mount, Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, write that with the NATO summit in Wales, it is time to revisit the question of what to do with U.S. tactical nukes in Europe. Despite Russian aggression in Ukraine and claims that these weapons are needed now more than ever, Kristensen and Mount argue that U.S. tactical nuclear weapons in Europe detract from more useful defense initiatives. With the recent actions by Russia in Ukraine, many of the new NATO members in close proximity to Russia are concerned about their security and look to the West for support. Kristensen and Mount state that the creation of the NATO Response Force in July 2014 (consisting of highly advanced forces from land, air, sea and special operations to deploy quickly when needed), is a great example of a more useful response to the threat posed to NATO members in Eastern Europe. The call to retain U.S. tactical nuclear bombs in Europe are are an echo from the past rather than a solution for the future as these weapons distract and divide the NATO alliance rather than unite it. Read the op-ed here. 

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