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FAS Roundup: April 5, 2016

Scientist Spotlight with FAS Board Member, Dr. Rosina Bierbaum Dr. Rosina Bierbaum is a Professor and Dean Emerita at the University of Michigan with appointments in both the School of…

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FAS Roundup: July 23, 2012

New online debate series, history of Soviet biological weapons program, India's nuclear arsenal and much more. FAS Launches New Online Feature: "Up for Debate" FAS launched its new online debate series, "Up for Debate." Every two weeks, the feature will highlight a new science and security issue to be discussed by experts and leaders from academia, government and policy. In the first debate, Dr. Mark Raizen from the University of Texas at Austin and Dr. Francis Slakey from the American Physical Society debate the benefits and risks of laser isotope separation. Is the promise of tapping into the rare isotopes of the elements worth risking the threat of nuclear proliferation? "Up For Debate" welcomes your suggestions for questions and experts. Please email your ideas for debates, as well as individuals whose insights you'd like to read to pir@fas.org. To view the debate and learn more about the Up for Debate series click here.   From the Blogs The History of the Soviet Biological Weapons Program: In 1972, the United States, the Soviet Union and other nations signed the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention that was supposed to ban biological weapons.  At that very time, however, the Soviet Union was embarking on a massive expansion of its offensive biological weapons program, which began in the 1920s and continued under the Russian Federation at least into the 1990s. Steven Aftergood writes about the new encyclopedic work,  “The Soviet Biological Weapons Program: A History” by Milton Leitenberg and Raymond A. Zilinskas, which tells the story of the Soviet biological weapons program. New Army Doctrine Seeks to Minimize Civilian Casualties: Both as a matter of humanitarian principle and as sound military strategy, U.S. military forces should strive to minimize civilian casualties in military operations, according to new U.S. Army doctrine published on Wednesday obtained by Secrecy News. “In their efforts to defeat enemies, Army units and their partners must ensure that they are not creating even more adversaries in the process,” the new publication states.

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FAS Roundup: June 25, 2012

FAS issue brief and podcast on sanctions in Iran and North Korea, new CRS reports and much more. Sanctions and Nonproliferation in Iran and North Korea This week, FAS released a new issue brief, "Sanctions and Nonproliferation in North Korea and Iran," co-authored by Mr. Daniel Wertz, Program Officer at the National Committee on North Korea, and Dr. Ali Vaez, former Director of the Iran Project at FAS, which offers a comparative analysis of U.S. policy towards Iran and North Korea. Sanctions have played a major role in U.S. efforts for the denuclearization in Iran and North Korea. U.S. policymakers have had to find a balance between concerns over proliferation and other undesirable policies; between taking coercive action and considering humanitarian needs; and between taking immediate unilateral measures and seeking to build coalitions for a multilateral approach. You can read the report here. In a new edition of the FAS podcast series, "A Conversation with an Expert," co-author Daniel Wertz discusses the similarities and differences in sanctions against North Korea and Iran,  the relationship between U.S. and UN sanctions, and China's role as a trading partner with both countries. To listen to the podcast, click here.

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FAS Roundup: March 8, 2016

FAS Board Member Martin Hellman Co-Wins Turing Award On Tuesday, March 1, the Association for Computing Machinery announced that Martin Hellman and Whitfield Diffie have won this year’s Turing…

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FAS Roundup – January 14, 2019

FAS Senior Fellow will help World Bank Forecast Global Crises, Improve Disaster Response FAS has partnered with the World Bank to help the agency better…

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FAS Roundup- January 23, 2012

FAS Roundup: January 23, 2012 India's rejection of nuclear weapons for warfighting, future of nuclear power, reclassificiation of nuclear weapons information  and much more.   From the Blogs Dept of Energy Wants to Reclassify Some Info as "Restricted Data":  Steven Aftergood writes that the Department of Energy has asked Congress to amend the Atomic Energy Act to allow certain nuclear weapons information that has been removed from the “Restricted Data” classification category to be restored to that category. In a letter to Congress requesting the proposed amendment, Energy Secretary Steven Chu suggested that the current arrangement leaves some nuclear weapons design information inadequately protected. Indian Army Chief- Nukes Not for Warfighting:  On January 15, 2012, General V.K Singh said that India's nuclear weapons “are not for warfighting.” Hans Kristensen writes that the rejection of nuclear warfighting ideas is a welcoming development in the debate over the role of nuclear weapons in South Asia. Foreign Military Assistance and More from CRS: Secrecy News has obtained new CRS reports on chemical facility security, nuclear power plant design, and U.S. military detainee policy. Whither Nuclear Power?: In the aftermath of the Fukushima accident, Germany and Switzerland have put a halt to their nuclear power programs, America’s nuclear renaissance has slowed, and Japan is trying to figure out how to substitute alternative energy sources for nuclear power.  Dr. Y writes on the ScienceWonk Blog that it is understandable that the world might feel an aversion to nuclear power at the moment, but it is no more dangerous than any other form of energy. Army Foresees Expanded Use of Drones in U.S. Airspace: The Army issued a new directive last week to govern the growing use of unmanned aircraft systems or “drones” within the United States for training missions and for “domestic operations.” Much of the Army’s UAS activity will be devoted to UAS operator training conducted at or near military facilities. But beyond such training activities, the military also envisions a role for UAS in unspecified “domestic operations” in civilian airspace. Radioactive Tissues?: On January 12, 2012, Bed, Bath, & Beyond announced that it had received a shipment of steel tissue holders (manufactured in India) that were contaminated with radioactive cobalt-60. Dr. Y agrees that the tissue boxes are radioactive, but the question is whether or not they are sufficiently radioactive to cause health problems. Testimony of Reporter Sought in Sterling Leak Case: In a brief filed in the case against former CIA officer Jeffrey Sterling (who is accused of leaking classified information), prosecutors told the U.S. Court of Appeals that New York Times reporter James Risen should be compelled to testify at Mr. Sterling’s trial and to reveal whether it was Mr. Sterling who leaked information to him about a CIA program to disrupt Iran’s nuclear weapons program.

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FAS Roundup- November 28, 2011

FAS Roundup: November 28, 2011 New CRS reports, petition to assess nuclear threat, Take Action blog featuring Iran's nuclear program and more.  From the Blogs New CRS Reports: Secrecy News has obtained new reports from the Congressional Research Service; topics of these reports include: U.S. government programs to identify and deport criminal aliens and the U.S. government's response to the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA), a brutal paramilitary group in Uganda. Take Action- Iran's Nuclear Program: For the past decade, the Iranian nuclear program has been a point of stringent contention among the members of the international community, particularly between Western nations and Iran. Visit the Take Action Blog and learn about FAS's  recommendations for a peaceful solution to this conflict. Leak Prosecutions Inch Forward: The three ongoing prosecutions under the Espionage Act of individuals who allegedly “leaked” classified information to the press are slowly moving forward. Steven Aftergood writes about the cases of Jeffrey A. Sterling, (former CIA officer who is accused of leaking classified information to author James Risen), Army Private Bradley Manning, (the suspected WikiLeaks source), and Stephen Kim, former State Department contractor accused of leaking classified information to Fox News reporter James Rosen.

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FAS Roundup – October 29, 2018

New: Assessing India’s nuclear arsenal, strategy The FAS Nuclear Information Project’s Hans Kristensen and Matt Korda release the 2018 FAS Nuclear Notebook on Indian…

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FAS Roundup – October 31, 2016

‘A Dangerous Situation’ As U.S.-Russia Tensions Spill Over To Nuclear Pacts Hans Kristensen, Director of the FAS Nuclear Information Project, is featured on NPR’s Morning Edition, discussing…

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FAS Roundup – October 29, 2018

New: Assessing India’s nuclear arsenal, strategy The FAS Nuclear Information Project’s Hans Kristensen and Matt Korda release the 2018 FAS Nuclear Notebook on…

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