Airlift

BY ORDER OF THE AIR FORCE INSTRUCTION 10-406

SECRETARY OF THE AIR FORCE 16 JUNE 1995

Operations

MOBILITY FOR AIR MOBILITY COMMAND (AMC) FORCES

 

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

This instruction implements Air Force Policy Directive (AFPD) 10-4, Operations Planning, by providing general mobility guidance and capability standards for Air Mobility Command active duty forces, AMC-gained Air National Guard (ANG) and Air Force Reserve (AFR) forces, and the Civil Reserve Air Fleet (CRAF). This Air Force Instruction (AFI) complements Air Force Deployment Planning in AFI 10-403, Deployment Planning, for AMC-unique units and capabilities. This instruction does not authorize any increased manpower. AMC-gained forces may supplement this policy as required. AMC OPR is HQ AMC/DOXO.

SUMMARY OF REVISIONS

This revision aligns the instruction with AFPD 10-4, Operations Planning; clarifies and updates CRAF activation procedures, AMC command and control systems, mobility bag requirements and en route structure; deletes information covering special operations (SO) forces, theater airlift forces, and 23 AF responsibilities; and clarifies ANG/AFR response times throughout. The Air Weather Service became a Field Operating Agency (FOA) of HQ USAF on 1 April 1991 resulting in appropriate changes to weather support paragraphs.

Paragraph

Introduction to Mobility 1

Background Information 1.1

Command Relationships 1.2

Basic Operational Concepts 1.3

Capability Standards 1.4

Training and Evaluation 1.6

The Military Mobility System 2

Global Network 2.1

Air Mobility Command 2.2

Numbered Air Forces 2.3

OCONUS Units 2.4

Air Mobility Operations Group 2.5

Air Mobility Wing 2.6

Airlift Wing 2.7

Air Refueling Wing 2.8

Civil Reserve Air Fleet 2.9

AMC Deployment Requirements 3

Command and Control Requirements 3.1

Mobility Bag Requirements 3.2

Arming Requirements 3.3

Chemical Agent Antidotes and Pretreatment Tablets 3.4

Execution Requirements 3.5

Medical Operations 4

Aeromedical Evacuation 4.1

Paragraph

Aeromedical Evacuation Coordination 4.2

ANG/AFR Augmentation Requirements 4.3

Medical Support 4.4

Austere Base Operations 5

Austere Basing Concept 5.1

Bare Base Operations Concepts 5.2

AMC Unique Asset Equipping 5.3

Maintenance Support 5.4

Supply Support 5.5

Base Operations Support 6

Tenant Status 6.1

Force Protection 6.2

Civil Engineering 6.3

Services 6.4

Aircraft Petroleum, Oil, Lubricants Products 6.5

Intelligence Support 6.6

Personnel Support 6.7

Chaplain Support 6.8

Staff Judge Advocate Support 6.9

Weather Support 6.10

Financial Management Support 6.11

Contracting Support 6.12

Public Affairs Support 6.13

Historian Support 6.14

Page

Figures

1.1. Command Relationships 3

2.1. AMC Command and Control System 4

2.2. ERS System 5

2.3. Air Mobility Operations Group 6

Attachments

TACC Departure Message 21

TACC Shortfall Message 23

TACC Manpower/Material Message 25

List of Abbreviations 27

 

1. Introduction to Mobility:

1.1. Background Information. Air Mobility Command (AMC) serves the Department of Defense (DoD) in the following roles:

1.1.1. As an Air Force major command (MAJCOM) under the direction of the Secretary of the Air Force (SECAF), the Commander, AMC (AMC/CC), is responsible for training, organizing, equipping, and providing operationally ready forces for Unified and USAF commands worldwide.

1.1.2. As an Air Force MAJCOM, AMC also provides operational support airlift, Presidential airlift, and audiovisual services.

1.1.3. As the Air Force component commander of US Transportation Command (USTRANSCOM), AMC/CC executes airlift and air refueling missions as directed by the Commander in Chief, USTRANSCOM (USCINCTRANS).

1.2. Command Relationships:

1.2.1. The National Command Authorities (NCA) (the President and the Secretary of Defense (SECDEF)) issue strategic direction for airlift and air refueling forces through the Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS) to USCINCTRANS.

1.2.2. USCINCTRANS exercises Combatant Command (COCOM) of all USCINCTRANS-assigned air mobility forces worldwide through AMC/CC. AMC/CC exercises operational control (OPCON) through the Commander, Tanker Airlift Control Center (TACC).

1.2.3. At the direction of the SECDEF, USCINCTRANS transfers OPCON of forces to another combatant Commander in Chief (CINC) to meet temporary requirements within the combatant CINC's Area of Responsibility (AOR). Forces transfer OPCON at a specific time or location, as mutually agreed upon, or as directed by higher authority. USCINCTRANS retains COCOM.

1.2.4. SECDEF directs the SECAF to assign forces to combatant CINCs to meet permanent or prolonged requirements. The combatant CINC exercises COCOM of these mobility forces through the Air Force Component Commander.

1.2.5. Command relationships among the Numbered Air Forces (NAFs), subordinate units, and TACC are illustrated in Figure 1.1. Command lines run from AMC/CC through the NAF/CCs to the units. These units include the wing, Air Mobility Operations Group (AMOG), Air Mobility Support Group (AMSG), and Air Mobility Support Squadron (AMSS). Under this arrangement, NAFs maintain administrative command over these units, responsible for their preparation, administration, readiness, and support. AMC/CC exercises operational control, tasking, and Command & Control (C2) through the TACC/CC.

Figure 1.1. Command Relationships.

1.3. Basic Operational Concepts:

1.3.1. Strategic mobility forces must be able to:

1.3.1.1. Deploy combat forces and equipment to a variety of locations in varying threat situations using airland and airdrop delivery modes as required by the supported commander. Forces are ready to deploy when the vehicle (air or ground) is loaded and ready to start engines for departure unless otherwise specifically defined.

1.3.1.2. Provide strategic air logistics support.

1.3.1.3. Augment theater-assigned airlift and tanker forces in the performance of the theater mobility mission.

1.3.1.4. Employ resources effectively under austere environmental conditions.

1.3.1.5. Ensure accountability of personnel requirements and resources for deploying forces. Employ Air Base Operability (ABO) contingency response capability to support en route system stand-alone operations.

1.3.1.6. Ensure integration of AMC operations in theater host base contingency response programs.

1.4. Capability Standards:

1.4.1. Specific Mobility Capabilities Standards. Paragraphs 2 through 6 of this document contain specific mobility capability standards for airlift, air refueling, support, and technical service forces. AFMAN 10-401 (formerly AFR 28-3) describes resource requirements through the Manpower and Equipment Force Packaging (MEFPAK) System.

1.4.2. Munitions Capabilities. Specific plans will be developed for the designation, airlift, and employment of standard air munitions packages (STAMP) and standard tanks, racks, adapters, and pylons packages (STRAPP). These packages will be available for deployment within 24 hours of unit notification. HQ USAF, Air Force Materiel Command, and air component commanders will coordinate to ensure they develop and maintain STAMP and STRAPP consistent with planned use.

1.5. Training and Evaluation:

1.5.1. To ensure deployment readiness, documents used to define unit readiness capability, training requirements, and inspection criteria will reflect standards expressed in this regulation and AMC supplements. Unilateral exercises, as well as operational training exercises, are essential to maintain these standards. Operational readiness inspections as detailed in AFPD 90-2, Inspector General - The Inspection System, and AFI 90-201 (as supplemented) evaluate unit mobility capability.

1.5.2. According to Air Force Policy Directive 16-8, Arming of Aircrew, Mobility, and Overseas Personnel, all Unit Type Code (UTC) members deploying outside the CONUS must be armed and have completed weapons qualification training. According to AFI 10-403, all personnel subject to deployment or identified to deploy must complete appropriate deployment training. In addition, all members will complete arming and use of force training. Refer to paragraph 3.3 for exceptions.

1.5.3. According to AFI 32-4002, all military personnel (except those listed as specifically exempted) and emergency essential civilians assigned to a deployment position as determined by the Global Assets List (GAL) and deployable to a chemical-biological (CB) threat area will receive the CB Defense Course of instruction and Individual CB Defense Qualification Training.

1.5.4. Unit commanders will pre-identify UTC personnel requiring specialized disaster preparedness training, i.e., shelter management, contamination control (decontamination), etc., to the installation's disaster preparedness office for scheduling of training.

1.5.5. To facilitate the training needs of the command, AMC is establishing the Air Mobility Warfare Center (AMWC). This center consolidates the basic air mobility course with air transportation, tanker maintenance and tactics, mobile C3, and ground combat readiness training. AMC will also emphasize training units at their probable deployment en route locations. This will maximize corporate memory while maintaining flexibility.

1.6. Air National Guard / Air Force Reserve. The organization of AMC-gained ANG/AFR units parallels comparable active units and must meet mobility standards similar to those identified in the USAF War and Mobilization Plan (WMP) for active duty units.

2. The Military Mobility System:

2.1. Global Network. The military mobility mission is supported by a global network of command and control, aerial port, maintenance, logistics, and associated mission support elements. Expansion of this network is necessary during both wartime contingencies and exercises to support increases in operating locations and aircraft utilization rates.

2.2. Air Mobility Command. All unit levels are tasked by the TACC and report through the NAFs. This includes air mobility wings (AMWs), airlift wings (AWs), air refueling wings (ARWs), AMOGs, AMSGs, and their associated units that are responsible for conducting and supporting the air mobility mission.

2.2.1. AMC Command and Control System (Fixed):

2.2.1.1. An AMC network of C2 centers including Consolidated Command Posts (CPs) and Air Mobility Control Centers (AMCCs) provides worldwide command and control of USCINCTRANS-assigned and theater CINC-assigned mobility forces. Although CPs and AMCCs do not exercise OPCON, they serve as a direct agent of the TACC or the commander exercising OPCON (see paragraph 1.2 above). However, mobility support relationships are varied and fluid. Figure 1.2 below serves as a general guideline to the type of mission and responsible CP or AMCC:

Figure 2.1. AMC Command and Control System.

Type of Mission Responsible C2

Airlift/Air Refueling/

Aeromedical Evacuation Airlift:

USCINCTRANS-assigned TACC, AME

Civil Reserve Air Fleet Individual air carrier operations centers

89 Airlift Wing

(89 AW) (C-12A/D): Andrews AFB command post (CP)

Special Air Mission Andrews AFB CP

Exercise or contingency As specified in Operations Order (OPORD) or

Fragmentary Order

2.2.1.2. Civil Reserve Air Fleet (CRAF) command and control is an essential element of the AMC command and control system. The CRAF is composed of US civil air carriers which contractually commit themselves to provide operating and support personnel, facilities, and

aircraft to the air mobility mission. The HQ AMC Contingency Response Team (CRT) directs large-scale commercial augmentation and CRAF-activated operations. The HQ AMC Contingency Response Cell (CRC), through the TACC, schedules CRAF-activated operations. At other times, HQ AMC Contract Airlift (DOK) contracting officers coordinate with TACC mission schedulers to set up daily commercial augmentation channel, special assignment airlift missions (SAAM), or exercise missions. The CRAF carriers provide primary command and control through individual airline operations centers. The AMC command and control system monitors all commercial augmentation. AMC/CPs/AMCCs coordinate execution with airline operations centers, HQ AMC/DOK, and the TACC.

2.2.2. The En Route Structure (ERS):

Figure 2.2. ERS System.

2.2.2.1. AMC ERS System. The AMC ERS is a fixed system complemented by a strategy to expand when necessary (Figure 1.3) by quickly deploying CONUS-based support forces and

OCONUS-based Air Mobility Control Flights (AMCFs) and laying down additional infrastructure as necessary to meet surges in mobility operations. This requires deployment of manpower and resources capable of operating under various environmental conditions ranging from fully functioning, modern facilities to unimproved bare-bases.

2.2.2.2. Fixed ERS. The fixed ERS is the core infrastructure of the AMC global reach mission. It consists of five major CONUS-based aerial ports of embarkation/debarkation (APOE/D) bases, 13 key overseas locations, and 18 smaller AMC and Navy-sponsored commercial contractor terminals. The overseas locations will be specifically manned to perform day-to-day air mobility activities with some surge capability to handle short notice contingency requirements.

2.2.2.3. Global Reach Laydown (GRL). During periods of increased military operational tempo, specified CONUS mobility organizations and resources are used to expand the fixed ERS or establish bare-base infrastructure where none exists. Under GRL, CONUS-based resources are teamed together to form deployable global reach elements. Small GRL Packages (GRLPs) contain the personnel and equipment needed to support GRL operations according to existing Unit Type Codes (UTCs) and force modules tailored to meet the concept of operations of any contingency. GRLPs also contain essential base operating support (BOS) assets.

2.2.2.4. Director of Mobility Forces (DIRMOBFOR). The DIRMOBFOR is the senior officer responsible for managing the theater or, if established, a joint task force (JTF) air mobility mission. The DIRMOBFOR will be designated by the supported Air Force Component Commander (AFCC), and work for the AFCC or the Commander of Air Forces forward of a JTF. Additionally, the DIRMOBFOR is further responsible for monitoring strategic air mobility operations into, out of, and transiting a specific AOR. In general, he plans and coordinates the execution of air mobility operations in accordance with the requirements and objectives of the supported commander, and ensures proper coordination of all theater and strategic air mobility assets.

2.3. Numbered Air Forces (NAFs):

2.3.1. AMC NAFs support global reach by assessing the combat readiness of assigned and gained forces. NAFs do not deploy; however they are responsible for ensuring their personnel, equipment, training, and procedures are compatible with assigned missions. They are responsible for their respective AMOG�s equipment and supplies. The NAFs will monitor AMOG cadre personnel and equipment status under the Status Of Resources and Training System (SORTS) reporting.

2.3.2. An additional responsibility of the 15 AF/CC is Commander, Task Force - Tanker (CTF-T). CTF-T will monitor the generation of tanker forces and manage the continuity of the alert force as they apply to the Single Integrated Operational Plan (SIOP). The CTF-T will act as an interface between AMC and USSTRATCOM during tanker generation and provide tanker functional expertise to USCINCSTRAT.

2.4. Outside the CONUS (OCONUS) Units

2.4.1 Air Mobility Support Group (AMSG). This organization formulates plans, establishes procedures, and directs the administration of subordinate units in support of DoD-sponsored aircraft, cargo, and passengers. It also manages budget, contracting and safety programs while providing logistics, intelligence, and air transportation planning to meet mission requirements.

2.4.2 Air Mobility Support Squadron (AMSS). The AMSS operates air terminal facilities in support of DoD sponsored customers. In this role, it generates, launches and recovers AMC and theater airlift mission en route aircraft. It also operates a C2 center.

2.4.3 Air Mobility Control Flight (AMCF). Organizes, trains, and equips personnel to deploy Tanker-Airlift Control Elements (TALCEs) and Mission Support Teams (MSTs). Establishes or sustains command, control, and mission support for strategic and theater air mobility forces and conducts onload, offload, and crew control management for operating locations in support of GRL.

2.5. Air Mobility Operations Group (AMOG).

Figure 2.3. Air Mobility Operations Group.

2.5.1 Each NAF (15AF and 21AF) is assigned an AMOG (figure 1.4) designed specifically to focus on GRL implementation. AMOGs do not deploy; however, they coordinate the deployment of assigned squadrons, ensuring personnel, equipment, training, and procedures are compatible with assigned missions. The AMOG includes an Air Mobility Operations Squadron (AMOS), Air Mobility Control Squadron (AMCS), Air Mobility Communications Squadron (AMCOMS), Air Mobility Maintenance Squadron (AMMS), Aerial Port Squadron (APS), and a Combat Camera Squadron (CTCS).

2.5.2. AMOG Squadrons. Each squadron will be manned with a cadre of personnel to deploy (augmented by other AMC units when necessary) and form operational organizations (Air Mobility Element (AME), TALCE, etc.) or provide mobility mission support, as directed by the TACC. These organizations will extend the existing mobility support system during a contingency or exercise. These cadres must be capable of deployment within 12 hours of notification (unless otherwise specified). ANG/AFR units ordered to active duty to support AMC mobility missions must be able to deploy within 72 hours of notification (includes 24 hours for mobilization) unless otherwise directed.

2.5.3. Air Mobility Operations Squadron (AMOS). The AMOS deploys the initial cadre to form, when requested, an AME. The AME, acting as an agent of the TACC, monitors, coordinates and interfaces strategic airflow with theater airlift when required. AMC will augment the Air Operations Center (AOC) Tanker Management Cell to manage theater tanker operations as required. The Tanker Cell is responsible to the AOC for theater tanker operations. AMC will provide personnel to operate an Aerial Port Control Center (APCC) within the theater AOC, if required.

2.5.3.1. Theater Airlift Liaison Officers (TALOs) are highly qualified, rated Air Force officers with airlift expertise and assigned duties with ground combat units. When deployed, TALOs are under the OPCON of the tactical air control party (TACP) senior air liaison officer. AMC/CC retains command of AMC TALOs, exercised through the TACC. AMC TALOs are assigned to an AMOS for administrative purposes. The principal functions of the TALO are to advise the ground force commander on the capabilities, limitations and best use of airlift resources, and to coordinate requested airlift missions. TALOs operate the advance notification and coordination net. The AMC command and control system must provide the TALO with information concerning missions operating in or through the area of operations. The TALO coordinates primarily with the area AOC, components of the Army air-ground system, aircrews in the area, TALCEs, other TALOs, and any other agencies supporting these missions.

2.5.3.2. TALOs deploy with their assigned TACP which usually deploys with their assigned Army unit.

2.5.4. Air Mobility Control Squadron (AMCS). AMCS provides AMC the capability to operate at worldwide locations where little or no operational support exists. In order to meet this objective, AMCSs accomplish the following specific missions:

2.5.4.1. Establish and operate Tanker Airlift Control Elements (TALCEs) to provide C2 of AMC forces and operational management of AMC assets at designated airfields. Additionally, the AMCS provides the capability to sustain operations under bare base conditions and unit self-sufficiency as required.

2.5.4.2. Deploys Mission Support Teams (MSTs) to manage air mobility operations and provide support to airlift users in moving cargo and passengers under circumstances when a TALCE is not required or not available.

2.5.4.3. Conducts airfield surveys to assess the capability and limitations of specific airfields to support planned or anticipated air mobility operations.

2.5.4.4. Provides training in air mobility planning and equipment preparation for airlift to all military units which are identified as air mobile or air transportable.

2.5.4.5. Provides communications support to other AMC C2 agencies when AMC contingency communications cannot meet their requirements.

2.5.4.6. Provides stage crew management at designated en route or deployed locations.

2.5.5. Tanker Airlift Control Element. A TALCE is a composite organization designed to support missions transiting locations where command and control, mission reporting, or required support functions are nonexistent. TALCEs are composed of UTCs consisting primarily of personnel and equipment maximized for self-sustained operations. A TALCE has an operations center and functional area mission support elements, as required, such as aerial port, intelligence, logistics, weather, and medical.

2.5.5.1. TALCE cadre members must be able to deploy within 12 hours of notification and immediately establish operations at a deployed location. TALCE cadre members from ANG/AFR associate wings must be able to deploy within 72 hours of initial notification (including 24 hours for mobilization) when ordered to active duty to support AMC mobility missions.

2.5.5.2. AMC active duty TALCEs possess Mobility Air Reporting and Communications (MARC) Systems. The module is a modified bare base expandable shelter equipped with necessary secure voice and data communications equipment to perform the TALCE missions. Aircraft or trucks can transport the module for rapid global deployment.

2.5.5.3. Depending on the situation, a deployed TALCE may be responsible for reporting directly to the National Military Command Center (NMCC), theater AOC, or the TACC.

2.5.6. Air Mobility Communications Squadron (AMCOMS). The mission of the AMCOMS is to provide basic communications for the first 30 days at the beddown locations. This support includes long haul communications, telephones, UHF SATCOM voice and data, HF and UHF/VHF ground-to-air radios and land mobile radios.

2.5.6.1. OPLANs or OPORDs may call for communications teams to deploy from CONUS or theater-assigned units.

2.5.6.2. AMCOMS must maintain capability to:

2.5.6.2.1. Deploy teams within 12 hours of notification.

2.5.6.2.2. Provide worldwide UHF SATCOM voice and data service for both airborne and ground forces.

2.5.6.2.3. Provide communications teams described in unit Designated Operatioinal Capability (DOC) statement, the GAL, or as tasked in OPLANs.

2.5.7. Air Mobility Maintenance Squadron (AMMS): The mission of the AMMS is to provide properly trained and equipped aircraft maintenance personnel, ready to deploy to help ensure those levels of aircraft maintenance reliability achieved during peacetime extend to expanded operations as well. When deploying to bases with existing maintenance infrastructure, the senior maintenance person will serve as the focal point for logistics requirements at that base and will interface with host base agencies on logistics matters.

2.5.7.1. AMMS must maintain capability to:

2.5.7.1.1. Deploy teams within 12 hours of notification.

2.5.7.1.2. Provide maintenance teams described in unit DOC statement, the GAL, or as tasked in OPLANs.

2.5.8. Aerial Port Squadron (APS): A network of aerial ports strategically located to permit rapid processing of airlift requirements is an integral part of the military airlift system. Aerial port units must be capable of providing support for on-loading and off-loading AMC missions. Units with a mobility mission must be capable of deploying as an element of a TALCE, or independently to establish and operate one or more contingency air terminals. Mobility units must deploy with organization information management, supply, and transportation functions. The size of the deploying aerial port will be dependent on the environment and magnitude of the airlift operations supported.

2.5.8.1. Aerial port squadrons must be capable of rapid deployment operations.

2.5.8.1.1. Aerial port squadrons must conduct sustained operations under surge workload conditions and deploy personnel and equipment within 12 hours of notification.

2.5.8.1.2. Aerial port flights within the AMSS must maintain the capability to:

2.5.8.1.2.1. Deploy all required personnel and equipment within 12 hours of notification, unless directed by a higher state of readiness.

2.5.8.1.2.2. Serve as a source of aerial port capability in support of employment mobility operations within the theater.

2.5.8.1.2.3. Perform contingency air terminal operations immediately after arrival at a high-threat or austere deployed location.

2.5.8.1.2.4. Provide sustained strategic-type air terminal services.

2.5.8.1.2.5. Deploy as a self-contained unit with its own communications (usually line of sight limited) and self-defense capabilities.

2.5.8.2. ANG/AFR aerial port squadrons or flights must be capable of:

2.5.8.2.1. Deploying personnel or equipment, as required, within 48 hours (including 24 hours for mobilization) of notification to mobilize.

2.5.8.2.2. Performing fixed or contingency air terminal operations as an independent unit formed according to manpower force packaging guidance contained in AFI 10-401 (formerly AFR 28-3).

2.5.8.2.3. Augmenting other aerial port units.

2.5.8.2.4. Providing sustained air terminal services and support of tactical unit moves according to AFR 76-7.

2.5.8.2.5. Providing peacetime support to airlift units for extraction, aerial delivery, and assault air landing operations, as tasked for each ANG/AFR unit.

2.5.9. Combat Camera Squadron (CTCS). The CTCS will equip and train for deployment to perform both aerial and ground-based still and motion documentation operations. Missions include contingencies, exercises, weapons tests, humanitarian, and special public affairs and historical requirements. CTCSs are composed of UTCs consisting primarily of personnel and equipment maximized for self-sustained operations. Deployment tasking flows from the TACC.

2.5.9.1. During wartime or contingencies, combat camera teams support Air Component Commanders by providing: 1) theater-level armament delivery recording and processing, 2) audiovisual editing, processing, duplication, intermediate archiving and distribution, 3) management, 4) documentation, and 5) maintenance support, and 6) support to public affairs forward and rear activities. Combat camera teams must be capable of rapidly deploying these elements from CONUS and theater-assigned units to designated locations worldwide as tasked in operations and contingency plans. Air Combat Camera Service (AIRCCS) squadrons and detachments will provide managerial and limited supply and maintenance support to deployed combat camera teams.

2.5.9.2. OPLANs or Operations Orders may call for deploying combat camera teams from CONUS or theater-assigned units. Elements and teams must be properly organized and equipped, and must be logistically self-sufficient to carry out required photographic support tasks for 60 days. They will receive image processing and duplication support from existing in-theater facilities and CONUS-based units. Combat camera personnel participating in any contingency or operation are under the OPCON of the designated air component commander. Senior deployed Combat Camera (COMCAM) personnel will immediately establish communications with the Joint Combat Camera Center (JCCC), HQ AMC TACC, the appropriate air component command and/or unified command COMCAM functional manager -- both forward and rear elements, and the deployed public affairs Joint Information Bureau (JIB). Unless otherwise directed by the operational commander, AIRCCS personnel deploying to combat or potential combat situations will carry weapons.

2.5.9.3. Combat Camera must maintain the capability to:

2.5.9.3.1. Deploy teams within 24 hours of alert notification. Units with still photographers assigned will deploy an XFMVA UTC team, in the contingency configuration, within 6 hours of notification.

2.5.9.3.2. Carry out worldwide airborne or ground documentation of US Air Force operational activities, participation in significant events, and performance of wartime or contingency missions, as required.

2.5.9.3.3. Provide combat camera teams and support elements described in the unit DOC statement, the GAL, or as tasked in OPLANs.

2.5.9.4. Combat Camera units tasked for deployment are exercised in mobility operations during US Air Force and joint exercises and other evaluations.

2.5.9.5. Some AMC-gained ANG and AFRES units have CTCS support elements. These elements have 24 hours from notification for recall and mobilization preparations. They have the same mobility requirements as active duty units after recall and mobilization notification.

2.6. Air Mobility Wing.

2.6.1. The AMW provides unique advantages to supplement and enhance the core airlift and air refueling wings that make up the bulk of AMC's force structure. It combines airlifters and tankers together, on one base, under one commander, with one mobility mission. AMWs will not deploy as a complete unit but must be able to provide detailed force modules of personnel and equipment necessary to rapidly deploy to austere locations and commence stand-alone strategic mobility support operations. AMWs have a coordinated mobility staff which can tailor force packages to ensure flexible and effective support for planning, staging, deployment, employment, and mission execution.

2.6.1.1. Deployment and Employment. Each AMW must be able to:

2.6.1.2. Provide its full complement of aircraft to meet tasked operational requirements.

2.6.1.3. Conduct strategic airlift and air refueling missions to support operational requirements worldwide.

2.6.2. Capability Standards. Each active AMW must have the capability to:

2.6.2.1. Meet rapid reaction mobility requirements necessary to support deployments of other commands or services. Active units will be capable of supporting wartime flying hour utilization rates not later than 36 hours from notification. ANG/AFR units ordered to active duty to support AMC mobility missions must be able to support wartime flying hour utilization rates within 72 hours of initial notification (includes 24 hours for mobilization).

NOTE: KC-10/KC-135 units may be tasked to deploy from home station to provide theater support. Tanker home station initial response generation time is 48 hours. Unit regeneration time to initiate operations in theater is 17 hours for KC-10 and 15 hours for KC-135 units.

2.6.2.2. Provide all UTCs listed in the GAL or ANG/AFR database equivalents (see section 3). DOC statement UTCs are a subset of the GAL for SORTS reporting.

2.6.2.3. Operate under adverse weather conditions.

2.6.2.4. On-load, transport, and off-load nuclear ordnance according to the related weapon and airlift aircraft standards.

2.6.2.5. Provide intelligence and tactician support for mobility forces.

NOTE: Associate airlift and air refueling units must be capable of augmenting active duty strategic wings to meet wartime flying hour utilization rates within 72 hours of the notification to mobilize.

2.7. Airlift Wing.

2.7.1. The core AW is the basic organization for providing strategic airlift resources. Strategic airlift operational concepts are not based on complete unit deployment. Airlift wings and supporting organizations (except the 89 AW) must be able to deploy cellular support units or augmentation assets as tasked to support or extend the worldwide airlift system during periods of increased activity. Designated AWs are able to deploy on-equipment maintenance, information management, supply, and transportation support for sustained deployed operations. These wings maintain the capability to deploy designated assets while simultaneously maintaining home base operating capability.

2.7.1.1. Deployment and Employment. Each active AW must be able to:

2.7.1.2. Provide its full complement of aircraft to meet tasked operational requirements.

2.7.1.3. Conduct strategic airlift and aeromedical evacuation (AE) missions (exception: C-5 units not equipped or trained for AE operation).

2.7.2. Capability Standards. Each active AW must have the capability to:

2.7.2.1. Meet rapid reaction airlift requirements necessary to support deployments of other commands or services. Active units will be capable of supporting wartime flying hour utilization rates not later than 36 hours from notification. ANG/AFR equipped units ordered to active duty to support AMC mobility missions must be able to support wartime flying hour utilization rates within 48 hours of initial notification (includes 24 hours for mobilization).

2.7.2.2. Provide all UTCs listed in the GAL or ANG/AFR database equivalents (see section 3). DOC statement UTCs are a subset of the GAL for SORTS reporting.

2.7.2.3. Operate under adverse weather conditions.

2.7.2.4. On-load, transport, and off-load nuclear ordnance (exception: C-5 squadrons) according to the related weapon and airlift aircraft standards. The ANG/AFR unit-equipped C-141 squadrons will be part of the emergency nuclear airlift force only.

2.7.2.5. Provide intelligence and tactician support for airlift forces.

NOTE: Associate Reserve airlift flying units must be capable of augmenting active duty strategic airlift wings to meet wartime flying hour utilization rates within 36 hours of initial notification (includes 24 hours for mobilization).

2.7.3 Combat Control Squadron (CCS). AMC Combat Control Squadrons contain one 7-man command and control element and two 19-man tactical operations elements. The primary combat control mission is to support operations by providing a quick reaction force capable of deploying via high/low altitude parachute, scuba, amphibious, air mobile, overland, and airland techniques. Combat Control will furnish air traffic control/terminal guidance at forward landing zones (LZ), drop zones (DZ), extraction zones (EZ), and expeditionary airfields in visual meteorological conditions/instrument meteorological conditions (VMC/IMC).

2.7.3.1. In addition, combat controllers are capable of conducting reconnaissance and surveillance of potential assault zone sites and provide essential assault zone surveys. They may also position and maintain en route navigational aids and long-range secure command and control communications, provide limited weather observations, forward air guide for close air support, and demolition of unexploded ordnance on and around the assault zone. Combat controllers are also qualified to gather and report ground intelligence information in airhead areas.

2.7.3.2. Combat control teams (CCT) must be able to deploy within 12 hours of notification by AMC/TACC. This initial force provides air traffic control and long-range command and control communications for an initial 14-day operation without resupply. To sustain an operation beyond 14 days, this force must receive perishable supplies (batteries, ammo, rations) as designated by the combat control resupply unit type code. This resupply normally deploys within 7 days from the initial CCT departure point.

2.8. Air Refueling Wing.

2.8.1. The core ARW is the basic organization for providing strategic and tactical air refueling resources. Strategic air refueling operational concepts may not be based on complete unit deployment. Air refueling wings and supporting organizations must be able to deploy cellular support units or augmentation assets as tasked to support or extend the reach of US military forces during periods of increased activity.

2.8.1.1. Deployment and Employment. Each active ARW must be able to:

2.8.1.2. Provide its full complement of aircraft to meet tasked operational requirements.

2.8.1.3. Deploy designated air refueling forces to support strategic operations worldwide; designated air refueling forces supporting tactical operations in the AOR are under the operational control of the unified commander.

2.8.2. Capability Standards. Each ARW must have the capability to:

2.8.2.1. Meet rapid reaction air refueling requirements necessary to support deployments of other commands and services. Active units will be capable of supporting wartime flying hour utilization rates not later than 36 hours from notification. ANG/AFR refueling units ordered to active duty to support AMC mobility missions must be able to support wartime flying hour utilization rates within 72 hours of initial notification (includes 24 hours for mobilization).

NOTE: KC-10/KC-135 units may be tasked to deploy from home station to provide theater support. Tanker home station initial response generation time is 48 hours. Unit regeneration time to initiate operations in theater is 17 hours for KC-10 and 15 hours for KC-135 units.

2.8.2.2. Provide all UTCs listed in the GAL or ANG/AFR database equivalents (see section 3). DOC statement UTCs are a subset of the GAL for SORTS reporting.

2.8.2.3. Operate under adverse weather conditions.

NOTE: Associate Reserve air refueling units must be capable of augmenting their counterpart active duty strategic air refueling units to meet wartime flying hour utilization rates within 36 hours of initial notification (includes 24 hours for mobilization).

2.8.3. Tanker Task Force (TTF). TTFs form and deploy in response to peacetime or contingency activities when concentrated air refueling support is critical to the mission, such as fighter deployments, air mobility operations, intercontinental bomber operations, theater employment missions, or training and exercise requirements. They are designed and sourced to support specific mission requirements in areas without an established tanker presence.

2.8.3.1. TTFs may also form to supplement assigned theater tanker forces. Units tasked to augment theater specific operations will be supported as necessary by theater commanders in line with appropriate command-to-command agreements (CCAs). This support includes, but is not limited to, operations, employment, logistics, intelligence, maintenance, scheduling, reporting, transportation, and medical. If required, TTFs can also support non-theater air refueling missions as well. Most tanker deployments will occur under the integral tanker unit deployment (ITUD) concept, providing aviation, logistics, and BOS packages in most cases. This concept supports units training together the way they deploy and operate together.

NOTE: At locations where a deployed TALCE is in place, limited (Primary Authorized Aircraft (PAA) of 3 or less) TTF support type operations will be the responsibility of the deployed TALCE, augmented as required by tanker scheduling and tactics personnel.

2.9. Civil Reserve Air Fleet (CRAF).

2.9.1. The CRAF is a Department of Defense and Department of Transportation program designed to augment AMC organic airlift resources during time of contingency or national emergencies. CRAF aircraft are assigned to any of the three stages of CRAF which provides the flexibility to tailor the size of the force to meet the contingency.

2.9.2. Deployment and Employment. CRAF assets are activated based on stage assignment and the capability of each aircraft type.

2.9.2.1. Stage I--Committed Expansion. This is passenger and cargo capability from the long range international section, used to perform mobility services when the AMC organic airlift force cannot meet both deployment and other traffic requirements simultaneously. USCINCTRANS has the authority to activate CRAF Stage I with the approval of SECDEF.

2.9.2.2. Stage II--Defense Airlift Emergency. This is additional airlift expansion identified for an airlift emergency not warranting complete national mobilization. All three segments of CRAF (International, Aeromedical, and National) become available under this stage activation except for the Domestic Services section of the National Segment. USCINCTRANS has the authority to activate CRAF Stage II with the approval of SECDEF.

2.9.2.3. Stage III--National Emergency. This is the total CRAF airlift capability made available when required for DoD operations involving US military forces. The SECDEF will issue the order to activate CRAF Stage III only after a defense oriented national emergency has been declared by the President, a national emergency has been declared by Congress, or a national security situation short of full mobilization has been declared. AMC will communicate the notice of total CRAF activation to all CRAF carriers. Upon CRAF Stage III activation, the total capability of all aircraft may be used.

2.9.3. Capability Standards. Carriers must have their aircraft available to perform airlift missions within 24 hours after mission assignment following activation of CRAF Stage I or Stage II and within 48 hours during CRAF Stage III. The response time after call-up for the aeromedical segment is 48 hours for Stages II and III. This provides time for the purposes of aircraft reconfiguration.

3. AMC Deployment Requirements:

3.1. Command and Control Requirements:

3.1.1. The host unit commander will designate an Installation Deployment Officer (IDO) and alternates.

3.1.2. Unit commanders with a deployment commitment will designate a Unit Deployment Manager (UDM) and alternates to the IDO.

3.1.3. The Global Assets List (GAL). The GAL is a capabilities database and is the command's single source document used to select forces to task for execution for all AMC and AMC-gained forces. However, this does not preclude the TACC from tasking through other avenues when operationally required. The National Guard Bureau (NGB) and HQ AFRES will maintain the UTC Management Information System (UMIS) and the AFRES War Mobility Plan (WMP)-III databases, respectively. ANG/AFR forces may use their UMIS/AFRES WMP-III databases for supplying and training their units. AMC, NGB, and AFRES may source Operations Plans (OPLANs) from their respective databases. The NGB and HQ AFRES will send these files to HQ AMC/DOX no later than the fifteenth of each month. HQ AMC will review the UMIS and AFRES WMP-III each month. HQ AMC functional managers will work with their ANG/AFR counterparts to resolve any discrepancies between the UMIS, AFRES WMP-III, and GAL databases. Once discrepancies are resolved, the appropriate databases will be updated. If required, the UMIS/AFRES WMP-III will be retransmitted to HQ AMC/DOX NLT 2 working days prior to the end of the month. HQ AMC/DOX will incorporate the revised UMIS/AFRES WMP-III inputs (along with AMC functional manager updates for active duty forces) and distribute the GAL at the close of the first working day each month. This will ensure the GAL matches the UMIS and AFRES WMP-III, accurately depicting the total force capability.

3.1.3.1. Commanders will ensure their unit is capable of supporting each UTC. They must also identify conflicts between DOC statements and the GAL (UMIS/AFRES WMP-III for the ANG/AFR) to the wing plans office (XP), who will coordinate disparities in hard copy with HQ AMC/DOT (MAJCOM DOC statement OPR), and with info copies to HQ AMC/DOX (MAJCOM MEFPAK OPR), HQ AMC/LGXWM, and the appropriate functional manager(s). ANG units will coordinate directly with NGB/XOX to resolve disparities between DOC statements and UMIS. NGB/XOX will coordinate with AMC to resolve discrepancies.

3.1.3.2. The accuracy of the GAL data is the responsibility of the HQ AMC UTC functional manager. NGB and HQ AFRES functional managers share this responsibility for Guard and Reserve data.

3.1.4. The Contingency Operations/Mobility Planning and Execution System (COMPES) will contain all the UTCs listed in the GAL/UMIS/AFRES WMP-III and all other UTCs supporting non-AMC units on the installation. COMPES-B includes the Manpower and Personnel Module-Base level (MANPER-B) and the Logistics Module-Base level (LOGMOD-B).

3.1.4.1. All UTCs in the Logistics Planning Subsystem (LOGPLAN) will be standard to the increment level to the maximum extent possible as contained in the Logistics Force Packaging System (LOGFOR).

3.1.4.2. Identify deviations from the LOGFOR to the primary unit. The primary unit handles LOGFOR management responsibilities for a UTC, and evaluates these deviations for tailoring of the standard UTC.

3.1.4.3. Primary and Non-Primary units will add unit-unique increment numbers to the end of the standard UTC number series.

3.1.4.4. Primary and Non-Primary units will use the following standard item numbers on all pallet increments to identify pallet associated equipment:

ITEM NUMBER NOUN

01 463L Pallet

02 Net Top

03 Net Side

04 Dunnage

05 MB1 Device

06 MB2 Device

07 10,000 LB Chain

08 25,000 LB Chain

09 Couplers

NOTE: Units will only identify assets when necessary. Do not use items 05 through 09 if they are not required. Regardless, pallet contents will always start with item number 10.

3.1.5. The IDO and the deployment staff will seek continuous systematic process improvement in all deployment operations areas.

3.1.5.1. Use flow charts to help understand and improve your deployment processes at all levels of management.

3.1.5.2. Focus identification and improvement efforts on critical processes (show-stoppers) first.

3.1.6. All deploying personnel must have adequate deployment and operations information to arrive and perform the mission at their destination.

3.1.6.1. The TACC will make all deployment information available to the unit as soon as possible after notification.

3.1.7. The unit IDO, XP, XPL or equivalent office, and XPO should be instrumental in performing the tasking analysis during the initial stages of notification.

3.2. Mobility Bag Requirements:

3.2.1. An A, B, and C bag is authorized for each manpower requirement reflected in the deployable UTCs listed in the GAL (UMIS/AFRES WMP-III for the ANG/AFR). Serviceable flak vests are required for 80 percent of the conventional deployable requirement. For ANG units, ANGI 23-201 will be the source for mobility bag contents and configurations based upon activation and assignment to AMC. The goal of the ANG/AFR forces will be to match AMC mobility bag standards to ensure seamless transition upon full mobilization as stated in previous paragraphs of this AF instruction. ANG units will provide mobility bag posture reports via Mobility Automated Inventory Tracking System (MAITS) to ANGRC/LGSE, who will keep HQ AMC informed on readiness issues.

3.2.1.1. KC-135 units will differentiate between SIOP and conventional UTC taskings, as listed in the GAL (UMIS/AFRES WMP-III for the ANG/AFR), to compute total mobility bag requirements. Mobility bags are only authorized for the most demanding of these two taskings, not both.

3.2.1.2. For units with SIOP support team taskings, A and B bags are authorized if hold point support will not provide equivalent capability. C bags are only authorized for SIOP teams deploying to a chemical-biological threat area (CBTA), or as required by the tasked OPLAN.

3.2.1.3. Each actively flying strategic aircrew member not already in a mobility position will have a Kevlar helmet, serviceable flak protection, chemical protective mask and ground crew training ensemble, and appropriate aircrew chemical defense equipment (ACDE). AMC aircrews are authorized Kevlar undershirts IAW TA016 part A, in addition to or in lieu of flak vests at the discretion of the commander. Each unit will maintain the protective mask used with the ground ensemble. For deliberate planning, an A, B, and C bag is authorized for 25 percent of the strategic aircrew force not already in a mobility position. If tasked to enter a CBTA, one complete operational ground crew ensemble will be issued to each strategic aircrew member.

3.2.2. An E bag is authorized for 50 percent of the total manpower requirements reflected in the deployable conventional UTCs (does not include SIOP) listed in the GAL (UMIS/AFRES WMP-III for the ANG/AFR). The Chief of Supply (COS) will store and maintain E bags for all organizations not listed in para 3.2.2.1.

3.2.2.1. Security Police, Prime BEEF, Prime RIBS, AMOS, and AMSS personnel are authorized an E bag for each manpower requirement reflected in the deployable UTCs listed in the GAL (UMIS/AFRES WMP-III for the ANG/AFR). These organizations will store and maintain their bags. ANG/AFR forces can centrally store if local requirements dictate.

NOTE: The total number of bags for these personnel (100 percent organizations) are part of the unit's cumulative requirement.

3.2.3. This instruction authorizes a 10 percent additive for all mobility bags to offset changes in tasking and tariff-sizing requirements.

3.2.4. Storage of mobility bag equipment will facilitate expeditious movement of forces and ensure the issue of serviceable, sized equipment (within tariff-sizing capabilities). The storing activity (COS or using activity) may store mobility bag equipment in prebuilt bags, bulk by item, or any combination which best satisfies mission requirements and equipment accountability.

3.2.5. HQ AMC/LGSW manages the required contents of standard AMC mobility (A, B, C, and E) bags. Contents of the standard AMC mobility bags are mandatory with no deviations or substitutions allowed. HQ AMC/DOTL manages ACDE (D bag). Required listings are as follows:

3.2.5.1. A-BAG:

ITEM NSN QTY

A-3 KIT BAG 8460-00-606-8366 1

BATTERIES 6135-00-835-7210 2

BELT, PISTOL 8465-00-577-4924 1

CANTEEN 8465-01-115-0026 1

CANTEEN CAP 8465-00-930-2077 1

COVER, CANTEEN 8465-00-860-0256 1

CUP, CANTEEN 8465-00-165-6838 1

FLASHLIGHT 6230-00-163-1856 1

FORK, MESS 7340-00-243-5391 1

GLOVES, LEATHER 8415-00-268-7870 1

HARNESS SUSPEND 8465-00-001-6471 1

HELMET, KEVLAR 8470-01-092-7525 1

HELMET COVER 8415-01-092-7514 1

INSECT REPL, AEROSOL 6840-01-278-1336 1

INSECT CREAM 6840-01-284-3982 1

KIT, FIRST AID 6545-01-094-8412 1

KNIFE, MESS 7340-00-240-7436 1

MOSQUITO NET 7210-00-266-9736 1

MOSQUITO ROD SET 7210-00-359-4850 1

NEOPRENE GLOVE 6515-01-364-8553 2

PAN, MESS 3740-00-242-5110 1

PARACHUTE CORD 4020-00-240-2146 50 FT

POCKET TOOL, SUR 5110-01-279-9332 1

PONCHO 8405-01-100-0976 1

POUCH, AMMO 8465-00-001-6482 1

SLEEPING BAG 8465-01-033-8057 1

SLEEPING PAD 8465-01-223-8421 1

SPOON, MESS 7340-00-243-5390 1

SUN BLOCK 6505-01-121-2336 1

3.2.5.2. B-BAG:

ITEM NSN QTY

A-3 KIT BAG 8460-00-606-8366 1

LINED FIELD CAP 8415-01-099-7843 1

MITTEN SET 8415-00-782-6715 1

MUKLUK INSERT 8430-01-057-3503 1

MUKLUKS 8430-01-061-5213 1

N3B PARKA 8415-00-376-1657 1

SOCKS, WOOL 8440-00-153-6718 5

SWEATER, WOOL 8405-01-224-9066 1

UNDERWEAR BOT 8415-00-782-3226 3

UNDERWEAR TOP 8415-00-270-2012 3

3.2.5.3. C-BAG:

ITEM

NSN

QTY

     

Overgarment

8415-01-137-1700

4

ITEM

NSN

QTY

Filter Cannister

4240-01-119-2315

8

Hood

4240-01-189-9423

8

Gloves, Chemical

8415-01-138-2497

8

GVO Boots

8430-01-317-3374

4

M8 Paper

6665-00-050-8529

1

Cotton Inserts

8415-01-138-2494

8

M9 Tape

6665-01-226-5589

1

Decon Kit

4230-01-276-1905

4

Mask

4240-01-327-3299

1

Canteen

8465-01-115-0026 *

1

Canteen Cap

8465-01-115-0026 *

1

Helmet

8470-01-092-7525 *

1

Web Belt

8465-01-120-0674 *

1

3.2.5.3.1. * The asterisks indicate items listed as part of a C-Bag but already in an A-bag.

When individuals deploy with a C-bag they will also be issued an A-Bag.

3.2.5.4 D-BAG: The following items outline aircrew chemical defense requirements for AMC aircrews as specified in AMCI 11-301.

 

ITEM NSN QTY

*MBU-19/P Hood/Mask Assy 8475-01-339-9782 1

*CQU-7/P Blower Assy w/Filter 4240-01-338-6066 1

Canistersand Batteries

*Suspension Strap Assy 1660-01-052-8861 3

*MXU-835 Intercomm Assy 5830-01-364-4595 1

White Cotton Drawers 8420-01-040-3149 4

White Cotton Undershirt 8420-01-040-3146 4

**Integrated Aircrew

Chemical Coverall

CWU-66/P 8475-01-328-3454 3

CWU-77/P 8475-01-328-3476

or

Flyer's Undercoverall Mk-1 8415-01-040-3136 4

Plastic Overcape 8415-01-040-9018 8

Butyl Glovers, 7mil w/White 8415-01-138-2501 8

Cotton Glove Inserts,

Long Gauntlet

Overboots, Disposable 8430-00-580-1205 8

Cannister, C2 4240-01-119-2315 10

Batteries. Lithium 6135-01-088-2708 4

 

 

 

3.2.5.4.1. As a minimum, each aircrew will be issued one ensemble for rapid deployment contingencies. The balance may be bulk stored and shipped to deployment locations or stored as individually sized items. One ensemble consists of : 1 Hood/Mask; 1 Blower Assembly w/filters and batteries; 1 Intercomm Unit; 1 Coverall/Undercoverall; 2 Plastic Overcapes; 2 pair of Butyl Gloves w/Inserts; 3 Suspension Straps; 2 pair of Disposable Overboots; 1 pair White Cotton Drawers; 1 White Cotton Undershirt. These quantities do not include authorized training equipment outlined in AMCI 11-301.

3.2.5.4.2. *Until sufficient quantities of Aircrew Eye Respiratory Protection (AERP) systems are available, earlier versions of ACDE may be used as a substitute. This system consists of: 1 ea MBU-13/P Chem-Bio Mask; 1 ea CRU-80/PFilter Pack w/filter elements; 4 each HGU-41/P Hoods, 2 each Suspension Straps; and 7 each M13A2 Filter sets.

3.2.5.4.3. **The CWU-66/P or -77/P are the preferred coveralls. CWU-66/P or 77/P IACCs may be mixed and either is acceptable for use by aircrews.

3.2.5.5. E-BAG:

 

ITEM NSN QTY

A-3 KIT BAG 8460-00-606-8366 1

ARMOR, COV, DES 8470-01-327-8546 1

BOOTS, DESERT 8430-01-325-6479 1

CANTEEN, COV, DE 8465P2567-42 1

GOGGLES, DESERT 8465-01-328-8268 1

HARNESS, SUS, DES 8465P2577-42 1

HAT, DESERT 8415-01-327-4828 1

HELMET COV, DES 8415-01-327-4824 1

PANTS, DESERT 8415-01-327-5329 3

PARKA, DESERT 8415-01-325-6435 1

PISTOL, BELT, DES 8465P5893 1

POUCH AMMO, DES 8465P2826-42 1

SHIRT, DESERT 8415-01-327-5300 3

UNDERWEAR BOT 8415-00-782-3226 3

UNDERWEAR TOP 8415-00-270-2012 3

3.2.6. Mobility bag equipment will be clean, serviceable, and meet shelf-life requirements.

3.2.7. The IDO will assess deployment taskings and inform the COS of the mobility bag requirements (supply managed and unit managed) annually in April. Limit requirements reconciliation between the IDO and the COS to once each year unless total base requirements change by more than 20 percent.

3.2.7.1. Units who manage their mobility bags will validate mobility bag requirements with the IDO using the above criteria.

3.2.8. The COS will update the supply MAITS report quarterly with requirements, authorizations (including 10 percent additive), on-hand inventories, firm or memo due-outs, etc., and submit reports (RCS: HAF-XOX(Q)XXX, Mobility Automated Tracking System) to HQ AMC/LGSWS by the first day of each quarter (January, April, July, and October). NOTE: This report is designated Emergency Status Code C-1, continue reporting during emergency conditions, priority precedence. Submit data requirements assigned to this category as prescribed or by any means to ensure arrival on the established due dates. Continue reporting during MINIMIZE.

3.2.8.1. HQ AMC/LGSWS uses the supply MAITS report to determine mobility bag posture and funding requirements, by base and command-wide.

3.2.8.2. For AMC-funded mobility bags, AMC tenant unit commanders on non-AMC bases will provide HQ AMC/LGSWSE their mobility Bag Validation (RCS: HAF-XOX(A)XXXX), annually NLT 30 May. (NOTE: This report is designated Emergency Status Code C-1, howver, continue reporting during emergency conditions, priority precedence. Submit data requirements assigned to this category as prescribed or by any means to ensure arrival on the established due dates. Continue reporting during MINIMIZE.

3.2.8.3. On non-AMC bases, the Unit Deployment Manager (UDM) will validate mobility bag requirements and submit them to the host COS where the unit is requesting storage.

3.2.8.4. If users manage their own mobility bags, they will have no less than the standard AMC mobility bag contents and no more than the standard unless approved by their HQ AMC functional manager. Security Police mobility bag requirements are identified in AMC Instruction 31-301. Users who manage their own bags will be responsible for inspection and shelf-life control IAW appropriate technical order requirements regardless of storage method used.

3.2.8.5. The supply mobility section will identify AMC standard mobility bag funding requirements in the supply MAITS report quarterly.

3.2.8.6. Bases/units will use available local Operational and Maintenance (O&M) funds for replacement of mobility bags. Defense Business Operations Fund (DBOF)-Transportation (T) funded units will use DBOF-T funds to replace their mobility bag items. All bases/units will budget for mobility bag shortfalls in their annual financial plan (O&M or DBOF-T).

3.3. Arming Requirements:

3.3.1. One weapon will be available for each manpower requirement reflected in the deployable conventional UTCs (does not include SIOP) listed in the GAL (UMIS/AFRES WMP-III for the ANG/AFR), except as otherwise stated in the medical and chaplain AFIs. Security Police weapons requirements (multiple weapons) are identified in appropriate Logistics Details (LOGDETS). AF Catalog (AF Cat) 21-209 lists ammunition requirements.

3.3.1.1. Table of Allowance (TA) 538 determines the type of weapon assigned to each position. However, the MAJCOM UTC functional manager may determine the type of weapon(s) based on the UTC requirements. Functional managers must ensure TA 538 is updated as soon as possible to identify any unit peculiar weapons they task/source.

3.3.2. Everyone assigned to a mobility position as determined by the GAL (UMIS/AFRES WMP-III for the ANG/AFR) will complete weapons qualification, arming and use of force training, except as otherwise stated in the medical and chaplain AFIs.

3.3.2.1. The person filling the primary mobility position and the first alternate have priority for Group B and C live fire training over all other positions IAW AFI 31-207, Arming and Use of Force, and AMC Pamphlet 31-207, AMC Arming Policy.

3.3.3. The wing commander will ensure each unit/squadron establishes a weapons familiarization program. This familiarization is in addition to weapons qualification training provided by Combat Arms Training and Maintenance (CATM) and is conducted by personnel within the unit/squadron. As a minimum, this familiarization will consist of weapons safety, loading and clearing procedures, clearing barrel procedures, disassembly and assembly, function check, care and cleaning, and a visual inspection. The objective is to ensure all weapons qualified personnel can handle weapons responsibly at home station and in a deployed environment.

3.4. Chemical Agent Antidotes and Pretreatment Tablets:

3.4.1. The UDM will coordinate with the installation medical treatment facility to obtain antidotes and pretreatment tablets, as directed by the tasking message.

3.4.1.1. Once deployed, it is the local commander's responsibility to ascertain current threat status, and balance mission needs with administration of nerve agent pretreatment tablets.

3.5. Execution Requirements:

3.5.1. Upon execution, wing XPs, or equivalent office will send coordinated equipment departure messages (see attachment 1) to HQ AMC TACC/XOOZ. Transmit this message within 24 hours of departure. In addition, Personnel Departure Reports will be prepared and transmitted IAW AFI 10-215, Personnel Deployment Reporting System., RCS: HAF-DPX(D)7150 (with info to HQ AMC TACC COMMAND CENTER/XOOZ). When an ANG/AFR unit prepares these messages, information copies will be sent to ANGRC/LGX or HQ AFRES/LGX as appropriate.

3.5.2. Wing XPs or equivalent office will send coordinated equipment shortfall messages (see attachment 2) to HQ AMC TACC/XOOZ. In addition, prepare PALACE BLITZ messages IAW

AFI 10-215 (with info to HQ AMC TACC COMMAND CENTER/XOOZ) to address personnel shortfalls. TACC validates shortfalls and takes action to source requirements. These messages will be transmitted ASAP but NLT 24 hours after tasking. When an ANG/AFR unit prepares these messages, information copies will be sent to ANGRC/LGX or HQ AFRES/LGX as appropriate. The reporting requirement in this paragraph is exempt from licensing in accordance with paragraph 2.11.5 of AFI 37-124, The Information Collections and Reports Management Program; Controlling Internal, Public, and Interagency Information Collections.

3.5.3. Wing XPs or equivalent office will send coordinated manpower/materiel messages (see attachment 3) to HQ AMC TACC/XOOZ. TACC/XOOZ will validate requirements and recommended sourcing. AMC functional managers, both internal and external to the TACC, will notify TACC/XOOZ and info HQ AMC/XPMPX/DPXX of validation results. (Note: During real world deployments, this message is required IAW time constraints identified on the Air Mobility Tasking (AMT) message. For exercises, this message is required NLT T-day minus 55 days.) When an ANG/AFR unit prepares these messages, information copies will be sent to ANGRC/LGX or HQ AFRES/LGX as appropriate. The reporting requirement in this paragraph is exempt from licensing in accordance with paragraph 2.11.5 of AFI 37-124, The Information Collections and Reports Management Program; Controlling Internal, Public, and Interagency Information Collections.

4. Medical Operations:

4.1. Aeromedical Evacuation (AE). The worldwide aeromedical evacuation system provides the required airlift and AE resources needed to manage and operate theater, strategic, and CONUS sub-systems. Air Combat Command (theater) and Air Mobility Command (strategic/CONUS) provide CONUS forces required to support aeromedical evacuation. AMC responsibilities include:

4.1.1. Deploying forces to a theater of operations to support strategic patient interface.

4.1.2. Providing strategic and CONUS aeromedical evacuation.

4.1.3. Serving as the Air Force aeromedical evacuation proponent, establishing overall DoD AE policy and doctrine.

4.1.4. Developing, coordinating input from other MAJCOMs with AE responsibilities, and publishing Air Force aeromedical evacuation policy.

4.2. Aeromedical Evacuation Coordination. The theater AE Coordination Center (AECC) has overall responsibility for the medical aspects of theater AE mission execution. AMC strategic AE operations may include the activated Aeromedical Segment of CRAF with B-767 aircraft and crews. AMC strategic AE operations execute under the operational control of the TACC, Scott AFB, IL. CONUS AE operations operate under the operational control of the CONUS AECC, Scott AFB, IL. Regional and/or forward deployed AE elements may be assigned management responsibilities to assist the TACC and CONUS AECC as dictated by the respective operation.

4.3. ANG/AFR Augmentation Requirements. AMC has no active duty forces with a DOC mission to provide strategic AE and strategic AE interface. Therefore, AMC's ability to support its mission responsibilities depend on the availability of AMC-gained ANG/AFR forces. ANG/AFR AE units ordered to active duty to support AMC missions must be able to deploy within 72 hours of initial notification.

4.4. Medical Support. Medical support for AMC deploying airlift forces will be provided either by identifying organic AMC medical assets to deploy with airlift elements, or by arranging for the supported Air Force Component Command or other collocated medical element to provide medical and other base support. The medical capability employed will consider the number of forces deployed to an operational location, threat assessment, projected disease/non-battle injury rates, and availability of other medical care within the operational area.

5. Austere Base Operations:

5.1. Austere Basing Concept. Certain operational situations and environments may require AMC forces to conduct operations at a bare base environment. Therefore, AMC forces must be prepared to operate into and from established bare base complexes with austere facilities. As a result, there is a need to organize, train, and equip forces able to deploy in minimum time and respond to immediate bare base operational requirements.

5.2. Bare-Base Operations Concepts. Reducing the number of personnel and the quantity and weight of equipment that require deployment as mission support to the minimum necessary is a primary consideration for AMC bare base operations. Support for AMC forces and the methods used to provide such support are dependent on location, the concept of operations, and the availability of local resources. The following basic concepts and standards provide general guidance for the mobility of AMC forces during deployment, employment and redeployment, when using established bare bases.

5.2.1. HQ AMC must review bare base materiel requirements once a year with HQ AFMC to establish levels consistent with unit operational and population factors.

5.2.2. HQ AMC will develop and review as required the support requirements for AMC, AME, TALCE, Maintenance Recovery Team (MRT), aerial port, and technical services deployable units. Specify detailed requirements such as utilities, security, covered storage, open storage, and parking ramps for each AMC deployable unit listed above.

5.2.3. AMC contingency communications elements (CCEle)(see AMOG) are available to support AMC/CC command and control connectivity during the initial employment phases of contingency and wartime operations. CCEles provide limited point-to-point and ground/air/ground secure voice and data communications via UHF single channel SATCOM, HF/SSB, and UHF/VHF. CCEles are capable of deploying within 12 hours of notification.

5.2.4. The supported theater commander must provide en route and terminal navigational support as well as ensure required common-user communications are in place at deployed locations for support of AMC forces.

5.3. AMC Unique Asset Equipping. Deploy or preposition HQ AMC required assets in accordance with guidelines specified in the logistics annex of applicable OPLANs.

5.3.1. Screen AMC assets scheduled for deployment or prepositioning to avoid unnecessary duplication and exceeding the capabilities of allocated air mobility assets.

5.3.2. Determine the quantity of AMC unique assets to be deployed or prepositioned based on maintenance concepts, required reaction time and flexibility, and peacetime authorizations of equipment for the using organizations.

5.3.3. HQ AMC retains control of AMC unique assets deployed or prepositioned in support of a bare base operation at all times. These assets will not transfer to other units without concurrence of the senior AMC representative on site.

5.4. Maintenance Support. Units will deploy with equipment and personnel necessary to perform on-equipment flight line maintenance. The deployment duration and location will determine if other equipment and personnel are required to perform complete scheduled organizational maintenance. The host base or another designated supporting facility will satisfy the repair requirements in excess of on-equipment maintenance capabilities. Toward the goal of providing safe, reliable airframes in support of bare base operations, the following maintenance concepts apply:

5.4.1. Limit maintenance support to preflight, through-flight, basic post flight, and the troubleshooting and repair (within capabilities) of unscheduled safety-of-flight discrepancies. The projected maximum number of aircraft on the ground (by mission design series, requiring simultaneous servicing) determines the number and types of maintenance personnel and equipment deployed for bare base TALCE operations. Conduct heavy maintenance at designated recovery locations outside the contingency area.

5.5. Supply Support. US Air Force policy on theater-positioned war reserve materiel provides for support of deploying AMC mobility forces and technical services. A combination of the assets at the deployment base, home unit Mobility Readiness Spares Package (MRSP), mobility and contingency assets, and home station assets will provide initial supply support for AMC forces, other than war consumables. Resupply for tactical units will be provided by the theater commander through established supply channels as outlined in the logistics annex of each OPLAN and supporting plans. Configure all mobility contingency equipment and aircraft spares on a modular concept to facilitate the deployment and support of varied force sizes. Provide war consumables, support equipment, and mobility contingency assets required to support deploying AMC forces as specified in the logistics annex of each OPLAN and supporting plan. ANG/AFR Supply units ordered to active duty to support AMC mobility missions must be able to deploy within 72 hours of initial notification.

5.6. Aerial Port Support. HQ AMC and host locations must recognize the criticality of aerial port materials handling equipment (MHE) to the AMC mission. Platform loaders, staircase trucks, fleet service vehicles, conveyors, etc., not commonly distributed Air Force-wide, require special consideration in the form of uniquely trained mechanics and the logistics tail to ensure timely support through locations particularly unfamiliar with the parts, POL (petroleum, oil, and lubricants), and resupply requirements of these assets.

6. Base Operations Support (bos):

6.1. Tenant Status:

6.1.1. AMC forces must prepare to conduct operations at a bare base. For AMC units deploying to an established bare base, HQ AMC TACC coordinates logistics support requirements with appropriate unified and specified commands, other services, and geographic area commanders. Where AMC units use bare base installations operated by other commands or services for staging, dispersing, or other operations, the command or service having jurisdiction over the base will provide logistics support to AMC tenant units as mutually agreed upon between the commands concerned. The BOS provided by host units or commands will normally include, but will not be limited to, the following:

6.1.1.1. Supply and spares storage, and requisitioning and issue under standard supply system procedures. AMC units should plan on using their MRSP for the first 30 days.

6.1.1.2. Availability and dependability of POL stocks and refueling capability, as required.

6.1.1.3. Base transportation capability to include vehicle operations and vehicle maintenance.

6.1.1.4. Civil engineering support, including site layout, utilities, fire protection, crash rescue, ABO/disaster preparedness, and explosive ordnance disposal.

6.1.1.5. Services support including food service, lodging, organizational laundry, mortuary affairs, recreation and fitness support, and field exchanges.

6.1.1.6. Medical facilities.

6.1.1.7. Chaplain support and facilities.

6.1.1.8. Staff Judge Advocate support and facilities.

6.1.1.9. Off-equipment maintenance within host capability.

6.1.1.10. Aircrew intelligence briefing and debriefing support. However, if intelligence support programmed or offered by the host is inadequate, HQ AMC will assign/provide organic augmentation to provide mobility oriented intelligence.

6.1.1.11. Security for deployed aircraft IAW standards established in AFPD 31-1 and AFI 31-101 (formerly AFR 207-1). If security or defense requirements at the deployment base(s) exceed host command and HQ AMC capabilities, US Air Force assistance may be required.

6.1.1.12. Common user communications.

6.1.1.13. Information management support to include official and personal mail, printing management support, administrative orders, locator service, records management, and document security guidance.

6.1.1.14. Aircrew weather brief and staff support. However, if weather support by the host is inadequate, HQ AMC will arrange additional weather support.

6.1.1.15. Public Affairs (PA) support beyond the capabilities of the deployed public affairs team, as required.

6.2. Force Protection. AMC must maintain a security force capable of deploying worldwide to protect AMC aircraft and resources at airheads, airfields, and forward operating locations (FOL) during combat and contingency operations. This force consists of security police air base defense elements and force protection/counterintelligence specialists from AFOSI. These units must be able to deploy worldwide within 24 hours of notification.

6.2.1. Security forces must be capable of establishing area security to protect deployed aircraft and resources immediately on arrival at deployed locations.

6.2.2. Air base defense elements must be able to immediately employ in a defensive mode (base perimeter protection) on arrival at deployed locations.

6.2.3. ANG/AFR security police units ordered to active duty to support AMC mobility missions must be able to deploy within 72 hours of initial notification (includes 24 hours for mobilization).

6.2.4. The 3rd Field Investigations Region (3 FIR) (AFOSI) is responsible for identifying, investigating, and neutralizing espionage, terrorism, and major criminal activities targeted against AMC resources. Collecting threat information and providing deployed commanders threat assessments allows the commanders to develop defensive measures and tailor operations accordingly. It is essential these forces arrive with initial deployed elements to properly accomplish their part of the force protection mission.

6.3. Civil Engineering. AMC must maintain a Prime Base Engineer Emergency Force (BEEF) capable of deploying worldwide to provide initial beddown of Air Force personnel and equipment using expedient or existing facilities. AMC must conduct ABO integration planning, execution, follow-on operations and maintenance support of facilities and utilities to assess, recover, and restore mission capability during combat operations or contingencies. These personnel must be able to deploy worldwide within 22 hours of notification. ANG/AFR Civil Engineering units ordered to active duty to support AMC mobility missions must be able to deploy within 72 hours of initial notification (includes 24 hours for mobilization).

6.3.1. These forces will maintain a 24-hour essential fire fighting capability for aircraft, structures, POL, and munitions, supported by fire fighting equipment and vehicles during combat operations and contingencies.

6.3.2. These forces will provide a planning and execution capability to integrate AMC resources to mitigate the effects of enemy use of nuclear, chemical, biological, and conventional weapons and maintenance of major accident and natural disaster response capability during combat operations and contingencies.

6.3.3. AMC is responsible for providing at least a 6-person explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) lead UTC, equipped to survey beddown locations for explosive hazards: to protect personnel, facilities, and resources from the effects of unexploded ordnance, hazardous components, and to clear booby traps and clandestine explosive devices from areas, enabling operations to begin or continue in a safe environment. The EOD team augments the US Secret Service and the US State Department in protection of the President, Vice President, and other dignitaries who might visit operational locations. AMC EOD teams must be able to deploy worldwide within 22 hours of notification. Additional EOD personnel and equipment UTCs may be available to support other requirements.

6.4. Services. AMC must maintain a force capable of deploying worldwide to provide food, lodging, organizational laundry, mortuary, fitness and recreation support, and field exchange to an initial beddown population of up to 1200 people using expedient or existing facilities. This force consists of Prime Readiness In Base Services (RIBS) teams, able to deploy within 22 hours of notification, and capable of providing listed services during combat operations or contingencies. ANG/AFR Services units ordered to active duty to support AMC mobility missions must be able to deploy within 28 hours of initial notification.

6.5. Aircraft Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricants (POL) Products:

6.5.1. Airlift aircraft will normally arrive in the contingency area with enough fuel for a departure flight to an en route or recovery base. Do not refuel aircraft in the contingency area of operations except in unusual circumstances.

6.5.2. The aircraft carries oils and lubricants aboard in a quantity sufficient to satisfy anticipated requirements.

6.6. Intelligence Support. AMC intelligence personnel provide intelligence support for mission planning, deployed C2 assets, and ground personnel. They also provide aircrew intelligence briefing and debriefing support in bare base environments according to paragraph 6.1.1.10. AMC forces will retain the capability for self-support of intelligence requirements in situations where such support cannot be satisfied by the host unit.

6.7. Personnel Support. Personnel Support for Contingency Operations (PERSCO) teams provide essential support to deployed forces including critical strength accountability for deployed commanders and owning MAJCOMs. Additionally, factor utilization of these teams in basic planning of any operation, exercise, or contingency for employment as well as redeployment actions. Consider PERSCO teams as essential personnel who must be among the first in and the last out of employment locations to maintain accurate strength accountability. These personnel must be able to deploy within 36 hours of initial notification. ANG/AFR units must be able to deploy within 72 hours of initial notification.

6.8. Chaplain Support. Chaplain Readiness Teams (CRT) provide essential religious support to deployed forces, including, but not limited to, worship opportunities, pastoral counseling, unit visitation, and advising the commander on religion, ethics, morals, morale, and quality of life issues. Include these teams in basic planning of any operation, exercise, or contingency. Deploy AMC-gained CRTs as required.

6.9. Staff Judge Advocate Support. The Staff Judge Advocate office provides support and advice on all legal issues and disciplinary matters that may arise. These include: military justice matters; claims; fiscal and contract law; international/operational law, including status of forces, basing rights, international agreements, foreign criminal jurisdiction, and Law of Armed Conflict; and personal legal assistance for deployed troops. Include judge advocate(s) and paralegal(s) in basic planning of any operation, exercise, or contingency. Deploy as required.

6.10. Weather Support. AMC must maintain a force of weather personnel capable of deploying world wide to provide weather services to airlift and air refueling operations or to augment theater weather teams. Personnel deploying in support of strategic en route tanker and airlift forces will be under the control of the TACC, but will coordinate weather support with the theater weather support unit/theater weather center. HQ AMC/DOW determines augmentation requirements as necessary. These personnel must be able to deploy worldwide within 72 hours of initial notification. However, TALCE support advanced echelon (ADVON) weather personnel may be required to respond for deployment within 12 hours IAW AMCR 55-3, Vol. 4.

6.10.1. Weather Equipment. Weather units must identify equipment and maintenance requirements to the appropriate communications units. Adequate communication capabilities (including tactical) are essential for weather teams to provide meteorological services to deployed forces. When dedicated circuits cannot be provided, the appropriate communication units will give weather support personnel access to common user or command and control communications with a priority dictated by operational considerations.

6.10.2. Weather Individual Mobilization Augmentees (IMAs). HQ AMC/DOW identifies AFRES weather personnel gained by active weather units as AFRES IMAs. The IMAs generally serve in wartime to backfill CONUS units, but deploy overseas as required.

6.11. Financial Management Support. If deployed to an established installation, coordinate with the host wing

Comptroller to arrange any required financial support. If deployed to a bare base environment, include Financial Management technicians in the ADVON, or as a minimum on the first aircraft departing along with the contracting personnel. It is essential that financial management and contracting personnel deploy together to ensure logistics requirements for arriving personnel have been satisfied.

6.12. Contracting Support. Contracting support is essential when deploying. Every effort must be made to include contracting support in the ADVON, or, as a minimum, on the first aircraft departing. This contingent is responsible for contracting for the initial arrival of personnel for any required contract quarters, subsistence, and transportation, as well as any other support required for material or parts. Ensure the accounting and finance function provides sufficient disbursing agents to allow timely contracting support for the contingency contracting officers.

6.13. Public Affairs Support. HQ AMC/PA will maintain Public Affairs teams of one to three people to support immediate air mobility taskings within CONUS or overseas to fixed locations, along the en route system, or to bare base operations. PA's mission within the AOR will include, but not be limited to, 1) advising the deployed commander and staff on public affairs matters, 2) providing unclassified facts and figures on AMC's deployed operation, 3) publicizing the mission, units, people, and their accomplishments to the American public, 4) setting the facts straight, 5) assisting legitimate news media in gaining command access, and 6) telling the AMC Global Reach story. These personnel must be able to deploy worldwide within 12 hours of notification and will require full messing, lodging, and sustainment support from the host unit. PA should be considered as essential personnel who should be among the first in and last out, and sourced during basic planning for all operations, exercises, or contingencies.

6.14. Historian Support. A historian technician will normally be deployed to collect and preserve information and documents and provide historical coverage of the contingency in accordance with guidance in AFI 84-102, Historical Operations in Contingency and War.

 

 

 

JOSEPH W. RALSTON, Lt General, USAF

DCS/Plans and Operations

 

 

EXAMPLE DEPARTURE MESSAGE

FROM /62 AW MCCHORD AFB WA//XPL//

TO /HQ AMC TACC COMMAND CENTER SCOTT AFB IL//XOOZ (FUNCTIONAL MNGR)//

INFO /HQ AMC SCOTT AFB IL//DPXX//

UNCLAS

OPER/PHOENIX BRUNO 94-1//

MSGID/SYS.RRM/HQ AMC TACC XOOZ//

REF/A/HQ AMC TACC AMT #459/XOOZ/12 OCT 94//

AMPN/DEPARTURE MSG//

RMKS/SUBJ: EQUIPMENT DEPARTURE FOR PID 192SO(1)

1. AIRCRAFT MISSION NUMBER __________(2) DEPARTED __________(3) AT __________Z(4) ON ________(5). ESTIMATED ARRIVAL __________(6) AT __________Z(7) ON __________(8)(9).

2. EQUIPMENT

TCN(10) UTC(11) DEP EC(12) NAME(13) NOTE(14)

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX HFHBV E1 ENGINE

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX T1 -86

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX S2 B-4A

NOTES:(15)

4. POC: 62 AW/XPL MSGT JOE, DSN 678-2571(16)

 

DEPARTURE MESSAGE INSTRUCTIONS

(indicated by superscript on example)

Wing XPLs, or equivalent office will send coordinated departure messages to HQ AMC TACC/XOOZ/(functional managers).

(1) Enter Plan Identification Number (PID) of tasking or tasking name.

(2) Enter departure mission number.

(3) Enter GEOLOC (geographical location) for mission departure location.

(4) Enter ZULU time of mission departure.

(5) Enter ZULU date of mission departure.

(6) Enter GEOLOC for mission arrival location.

(7) Enter estimated ZULU arrival time.

(8) Enter estimated ZULU arrival date.

(9) Include en route stops, as applicable.

(10) Enter Transportation Control Number (TCN) equipment departed on for tracking purposes.

(11) Enter equipment UTC assigned by TACC/LOCSR.

(12) Enter Deployment Echelon code. If the equipment is added leave blank.

(13) Use the noun from the LOGFOR.

(14) List notes that apply to the entire line.

(15) Enter notes for reference.

(16) Provide the grade, name, office symbol, and Defense Switched Network (DSN) phone number of functional manager(s) who prepared input for message addressees.

 

 

EXAMPLE SHORTFALL MESSAGE

FROM /62 AW MCCHORD AFB WA//XPL//

TO /HQ AMC TACC COMMAND CENTER SCOTT AFB IL//XOOZ (FUNCTIONAL MNGR)//

INFO /HQ AMC SCOTT AFB IL//DPXX//

UNCLAS

OPER/PHOENIX BRUNO 94-1//

MSGID/SYS.RRM/HQ AMC TACC XOOZ//

REF/A/HQ AMC TACC AMT #459/XOOZ/12 OCT 94//

AMPN/SHORTFALL MSG//

RMKS/SUBJ: SHORTFALL MATERIEL

PART II MATERIEL/LOGFOR

LOGFOR DATED 5 JAN 94

1. EQUIPMENT:

ULN(1) UTC(2) INCR(3) NAME(4) S/F(5) TOT(6) NOTE(7)

D7L03 HFHBV E11001 ENGINE 1 2 1

T10002 -86 1 4 2

S20221 B-4A 1 3 3

NOTES:

SHORTFALL JUSTIFICATION(8)

1. ASSIGNED 4 - 1 NMC - 1 DEPLOYED TO EXERCISE / FILL

2. ASSIGNED 7 - 2 NMC - 1 DEPLOYED TO EXERCISE / NO FILL

3. ASSIGNED 4 - 1 REQUIRED FOR HOME STATION USE / NO FILL

2. POC: 62 AW/XPL MSGT JOE, DSN 678-2571(9)

 

SHORTFALL MESSAGE INSTRUCTIONS

(indicated by superscript on example)

Wing XPLs or equivalent office will send coordinated Shortfall messages to HQ AMC TACC/XOOZ/(functional manager). TACC functional managers validate shortfalls and source fill requirements. Functional managers will notify HQ AMC/DPXX when personnel shortfalls are tasked to a new base and a levy needs to be sent.

(1) ULN can be found in the Air Mobility Tasking (AMT) tasked by HQ AMC TACC.

(2) List UTC as tasked by the AMT.

(3) Increment number of shortfall equipment from the LOGFOR.

(4) Use the noun from the LOGFOR.

(5) State how many of that increment number will be shortfalled.

(6) Support you are providing of the tasked increment number. If only one item was tasked, line can be blank.

(7) Give number of note that will explain the shortfall justification information.

(8) It is mandatory to give thorough, authorized/assigned information in order to justify shortfalls.

(9) Provide the grade, name, office symbol, and DSN phone number of functional manager(s) who prepared input for message addresses.

 

 

 

EXAMPLE MANPOWER/MATERIEL REQUEST MESSAGE

FROM /62 AW MCCHORD AFB WA//XPL//

TO /HQ AMC TACC COMMAND CENTER SCOTT AFB IL//XOOZ (FUNCTIONAL MNGR)//

INFO /HQ AMC SCOTT AFB IL// DPXX//

UNCLAS

EXER/OPER/PHOENIX BRUNO 94-1//

MSGID/SYS.RRM/HQ AMC TACC XOOZ//

REF/A/TELECON/TACC/XOOZ/2 FEB 93//

AMPN/EXERCISE MANPOWER AND MATERIEL REQUEST//

RMKS/SUBJ: MANPOWER AND MATERIEL GOLOSON INTL, HONDURAS

PART I. MANPOWER/MANFOR

MANFOR DATED 5 JAN 94

1. PERSONNEL GOLOSON INTL, HONDURAS 17 FEB - 22 FEB 94

ULN(1) LNR(2) UTC(3) AFSC(4) GR(4) DEL(5) ADD(6) TOT(7) NOTES(8) SOURCE(9)

HFHBV 2A451 0 1 2 62 AW

2A471 0 0 1 1 62 AW

2A671A 0 0 1 SHORTFALL

021A3 03 0 0 1 62 AW

NOTES:

1. MINIMUM GRADE REQUIREMENT IS A MSGT

SHORTFALL JUSTIFICATION(10)

AFSC AUTHORIZED ASSIGNED AVAILABLE

2A671 09 06 0

UNABLE TO SUPPORT THE ABOVE TASKING. OF THE 06 ASSIGNED, 4 ARE 3-LEVELS AND IN TRAINING, 2 ARE IN PCS OR RETIREMENT STATUS.

PART II MATERIEL/LOGFOR

LOGFOR DATED 5 JAN 94

1. EQUIPMENT: GOLOSON INTL, HONDURAS 17 FEB - 22 FEB 94

ULN(1) UTC(2) INCR(11) NAME(12) QTY(13)SOURCE(9)NOTE(14)LTH WTH HGT CCC S.T.(15)

HFHBV K20202 EXT50GLS 1 62 AW

K20210 GEN SET 2 62 AW

K20221 B-4A 1 62 AW

MULTISTOP 1 62 AW ADD 216 095 103 L2D 3.0

2. POC: 62 AW/XPL MSGT JOE, DSN 678-2571(16)

 

MANPOWER/MATERIEL MESSAGE INSTRUCTIONS

(indicated by superscript on example)

Wing XPLs or equivalent office will send coordinated manpower/material messages to HQ AMC TACC/XOOZ/(functional manager). TACC/XOOZ will validate requirements and recommended sourcing. Functional managers will notify TACC/XOOZ and info HQ AMC/XPMPX/DPXX of validation results.

(1) ULN will be assigned by TACC/XOOZ.

(2) List line number in far right-hand column of UTC in MANFOR. Enter "added" for requirements with no UTC line number.

(3) List the 6-digit identification code for the UTC as shown on the current MANFOR.

(4) List required AFSC including suffix/prefix. List grade required for all officer AFSCs.

(5) List number deleted per UTC line number/increment number. Use only when deleting requirements from a standard UTC.

(6) List number being added per standard UTC line number/increment number.

(7) Total per line. The total in this column should represent the total required for the listed AFSC after additions and/or deletions are considered for a standard UTC.

(8) List notes that apply to the entire line.

(9) Use this column to identify sourcing for line numbers. Write "shortfall" if a shortfall by the wing is expected.

(10) Justify shortfall with complete information on status of personnel/equipment.

(11) Increment number of required equipment from the LOGFOR. If the equipment is added, leave increment number blank.

(12) Use the noun from the LOGFOR.

(13) State how many will be taken in that increment.

(14) Enter "add" for equipment you would like to take which is not in the LOGFOR. Place a number with remarks to follow if you change an increment.

(15) Enter dimensional data if you add a piece of equipment to the package.

(16) Provide the grade, name, office symbol, and DSN phone number of the functional manager(s) who prepared input for message addressees.

 

 

 

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS

ABO Air Base Operability

ACDE Aircrew Chemical Defense Equipment

ADVON Advanced Echelon

AE Aeromedical Evacuation

AECC Aeromedical Evacuation Coordination Center

AERP Aircrew Eye Respiratory Protection

AF Cat Air Force Catalog

AFCC Air Force Component Commander

AFI Air Force Instruction

AFPD Air Force Policy Directive

AFRES ir Force Reserve

AIRCCS Air Combat Camera Service

AMC Air Mobility Command

AMC/CC Commander, Air Mobility Command

AMCC Air Mobility Control Center

AMCF Air Mobility Control Flight

AMCOMS Air Mobility Communications Squadron

AMCS Air Mobility Control Squadron

AME Air Mobility Element

AMMS ir Mobility Maintenance Squadron

AMOG ir Mobility Operations Group

AMOS Air Mobility Operations Squadron

AMSG Air Mobility Support Group

AMSS Air Mobility Support Squadron

AMT Air Mobility Tasking

AMW Air Mobility Wing

AMWC ir Mobility Warfare Center

ANG Air National Guard

ANG/AFR Air National Guard / Air Force Reserve

AOC Air Operations Center

AOR Area of Responsibility

APCC Aerial Port Control Center

APOD Aerial Port Of Debarkation

APS Aerial Port Squadron

ARW Air Refueling Wing

AW Airlift Wing

BEEF Base Engineer Emergency Force

BOS Base Operating Support

C2 Command & Control

C3 Command, Control & Communications

CATM Combat Arms Training and Maintenance

CBTA Chemical Biological Threat Area

CCA Command to Command Agreement

CCEle Contingency Communications Element

CCT Combat Control Team

CINC Commander In Chief

CJCS Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff

COCOM Combatant Command (command authority)

COMCAM Combat Camera

COMPES Contingency Operations/Mobility Planning and Execution System

CONUS ontinental United States

COS Chief of Supply

CP Consolidated Command Post

CRAF Civil Reserve Air Fleet

CRC Contingency Response Cell

CRT Chaplain Readiness Team

CTCS Combat Camera Squadron

CTF-T Commander, Task Force - Tanker

DBOF Defense Business Operations Fund

DIRMOBFOR Director of Mobility Forces

DOC Designed Operational Capability

DoD Department of Defense

DZ Drop Zone

EOD Explosive Ordnance Disposal

ERS En route Structure

EZ Extraction Zone

FOA Field Operating Agency

FOL Forward Operating Location

GAL Global Assets List

GRL Global Reach Laydown

GRLP Global Reach Laydown Packages

HF High Frequency

IDO Installation Deployment Officer

IMA Individual Mobilization Augmentee

IMC Instrument Meteorological Conditions

ITUD Integral Tanker Unit Deployment

JCCC Joint Combat Camera Center

JIB Joint Information Bureau

LOGDETS Logistics Details

LOGFOR Logistics Force Packaging System

LOGMOD-B Logistics Module - Base Level

LOGPLAN Logistics Planning Subsystem

LZ Landing Zone

MAITS obility Automated Inventory Tracking System

MAJCOM Major Command

MANPER-B Manpower and Personnel Module - Base Level

MARC Mobility Air Reporting Communication

MEFPAK Manpower and Equipment Force Packaging System

MRSP Mobility Readiness Spares Package

MRT Maintenance Response Team

NAF Numbered Air Force

NCA National Command Authorities

NMCC National Military Command Center

O&M Operational and Maintenance

OCONUS Outside the CONUS

OPCON perational Control

OPLAN perations Plan

OPORD perations Order

PA Public Affairs

PAA Primary Authorized Aircraft

PERSCO Personnel Support for Contingency Operations

PID Plan Identification Number

POL Petroleum. Oil, and Lubricants

RIBS Readiness in Base Services

SAAM Special Assignment Airlift Mission

SATCOM Satellite Communications

SECAF ecretary of the Air Force

SECDEF Secretary of Defense

SIOP Single Integrated Operational Plan

SITREP ituation Report

SO Special Operations

SORTS tatus of Resources and Training System

SSB Single Side Band

STAMP tandard Air Munitions Package

STRAPP Standard Tanks, Racks, Adapters, and Pylons Package

T-Day The first day of the month of an exercise/contingency

TA Table of Allowance

TACC Tanker Airlift Control Center

TACP Tactical Air Control Party

TALCE anker Airlift Control Element

TALO Theater Airlift Liaison Officer

TCN Transportation Control Number

TTF Tanker Task Force

UDM Unit Deployment Manager

UHF Ultra High Frequency

UMIS UTC Management Information System (ANG)

USCINCTRANS Commander in Chief, USTRANSCOM

USTRANSCOM US Transportation Command

UTC Unit Type Code

VHF Very High Frequency

VMC Visual Meteorological Conditions

WMP War and Mobilization Plan

XP Plans Office