SITE MAP

SEARCH

25 July 2003

Directory of RF Defense Related Agencies and Personnel

Main Index

General Staff

Districts & Fleets

Branches of Service

Related Agencies

Intell/Security Agencies

Defense Industries

Documents

Biographical Index

Unit Register

 

SEARCH

General of the Army Sergey Kuzhugetovich SHOYGU

(������� ����� ����� ������ �����������)

������� ���������� ��������� �� ����� ����������� �������, ������������ ��������� � ���������� ����������� ��������� ��������
Minister of Civil Defense, Emergencies, & Natural Disasters

Co-Chairman, United Russia Party

����� ������ �����������, ������� ���������� ��������� �� ����� ����������� �������, ������������ ��������� � ���������� ����������� ��������� ��������

��� �������� - 21 ��� 1955 ����. ����� �������� - �. ����� ��������� ����. �������������� - �������. ����������� ������.

������� � 1977 ���� ������������ ��������������� ��������.

������������� �� ����������� - �������-���������. �������� ������������� ����. ������� �����. ����� ���������� ���������.

������:

1972-77 - ������� ������������� ���������������� ���������

1977-78 - ������ ������ "�����������", �.����������

1978-79 - ������, ��������� ������� ������ "����������",�.�����

1979-84 - ������� ������, ������� �������, ��������� ������������� ������ "�������������������", �.������

1984-85 - ����������� ������������ ������� "���������������", �.����������

1985-86 - ����������� ������� "������������", �.������

1986-88 - ����������� ������� "����������������", �.������

1988-89 - ������ ��������� ����������� �� ����, �.������

1989-90 - ��������� ������������� �������� ����, �.����������

1990-91 - ����������� ������������ ���������������� �������� ����� �� ����������� � �������������, �.��-����

1991-91 - ������������ ����������� ������� ����������, �.������

1991-91 - ������������ ���������������� �������� ����� �� ������������ ���������, �.������

1991-94 - ������������ ���������������� �������� ���������� ��������� �� ����� ����������� �������,������������ ��������� � ���������� ����������� ��������� ��������

1993-�.�.- ������������ ������������ �������� ���������� ��������� �� ���������� �������������� ����������� ��� �� ���������� ��������� ��������� ��������

1993-�.�. - ������������ ���������������� �������� �� ���������� �������� - ������������ ������������, ���������� � ��������������� ���������� �� �� ����������

1994-�.�. - ������� �� �� ����� ����������� �������, ������ ������ ��������� � ���������� ����������� ��������� ��������

1995-�.�. - ���� ��������������� �������� �� �������������� ��������� � ���������� ����� ��������� ����������

1996-�.�. - ���� ������ ������������ ���������� ���������

1996-�.�. - ���� �������� �� �������� ������

1997-�.�. - ������������ ���������������� �������� �� �������������� � ���������� ������������ ��������

1997-�.�. - ���� �������� �� �������� ������������� ��� ������ ������� ���������� ���������

1997-�.�. - ���� �������� �� ����������� � �������������� ����������� ������� ������ ��� ������ ������� ���������� ���������.

10.01.2000 � 7.05 2000 - ����������� ������������ ������������� ���������� ���������, ������� ���

 

������ ���������� �� �� 18.03.93 �. ��������� ������� "�������� ��������� ������" �� ��������, ����������� ��� ������ ���������������� ����� � ������ 19-21.08.91 �.

������ ���������� �� �� 28.02.94 �. ��������� ������� "�� ������ ��������" �� �������� ���������� ����������� ����� � ����������� ��� ���� ��������.

������ ���������� �� N 1249 �� 20.09.99 �. �������� ������ ����� ���������� ��������� �� �������� � �������, ����������� ��� ���������� ��������� ����� � ������������� ���������.

������ ���������� �� N 508 �� 07.05.03 �. ��������� ��������� �������� ������ "������� �����".

������ ���������� ���������� ���������� �� 21.05.02 �. ��������� ������� "�������" �� ������� ����� � ���������� ������ � �������������� ����� ���������� ���������� � ���������� �����������.

������� ������ ������ ������������� 1997 ���� "�� ��������� ������� � ���������� ����� ������ ������������ �������������� ������ "������ � ��������", ������� ��� ��������� ����� �������� ���������� � �������".

������� ������ ��������� ��������� "���� �����" 1998 ���� "�� ����� ����� ������������ �������, ���������� ���������� ���������� � ������� ���������������� �������".

������� ������������ ������������ ������ ����� ����� �������� 1999 ���� "�� ����������� ���������� � �������� ������������ ������� ����������� ������������ ������".

�������� �������� ������� �������� ���������� ���������, ������������� �������� ���� �� ������������� ������������, � ����� ���������� � ������������� ���������� ��������.

(www.emercom.gov.ru).

Born 21 May 1955 in the city of Chadan, Tuva ASSR. Of Tuvan extraction. �His father held positions of responsibility in the party apparat and the executive branch, ventually rising to become deputy chairman of the autonomy's Council of Ministers. His mother worked as an economist in a sovkhoz.�   �One discernible hobby--he likes to sing to a guitar accompaniment.� 

  • Krasnoyarsk Polytechnical Institute (construction engineer) (1977).
  • Took part in erecting the  Abakanvagonmash, the Achinsk Oil Refinery, and the  Sayansk Aluminum Plant. 
  • By 1988 had moved up from foreman to head of a construction trust. Also worked in the Krasnoyarsk CPSU Kray Committee. 
  • In 1990 summoned to Moscow to serve as Deputy Chairman of the RSFSR State Committee for Architecture and Construction. In 1991 became head of the newly formed Russian Rescue Workers Corps, which was soon reconstituted as the Russian State Committee for Civil Defense Affairs, Emergencies, and Disaster Relief (the State Emergencies Committee). 
  • In January 1994 the committee became a ministry (the Emergencies Ministry). 
  • Married and has two  daughters. 

(VOYENNYYE ZNANIYA No 5-6, 92 pp 20-21). Promoted to Lt- Gen in May 1995, (ITAR-TASS 1520 GMT 5 May 95). (DELOVOY MIR 11 Dec 96 pp 1, 6). Promoted to Col-Gen (ITAR-TASS 1249 GMT 8 Dec 98). 
Promoted to Col-Gen (ITAR-TASS 1249 GMT 8 Dec 98).
    �During the first years of his career moved frequently. 1977-1978 was supervisor in the Promkhimstroy trust in Krasnoyarsk. Then he returned to his motherland minor, where in 1978-1979 he was senior supervisor in the Tuvinstroy trust. He moved back to Krasnoyarsk Kray, where from 1979 to 1985 he was supervisor in the Achinskaluminstroy construction trust. Then he was sent to Khakassia: In 1985-1986 he was manager of the Sayantyazhstroy trust, and from 1986 to 1988--Abakanvagonstroy. 
     �In Abakan, Shoygu was offered the chance to move to party work. � 1988-1989, second secretary of the Abakan city committee of the CPSU, in 1989-1990--inspector of the Krasnoyarsk oblast committee of the VLKSM [All-Union Leninist Communist Youth League]. In 1990, appointed deputy chairman of the RSFSR State Committee for Architecture and Construction in the cabinet headed by Ivan Silayev.
    �During his work in construction organizations and later in party and Komsomol organs, Shoygu participated many times in the formation of volunteer rescue brigades going to various disaster areas. Gradually, working in various emergency situations became the prime business for Shoygu--it appealed to him more than building the ordinary career of an economic manager. �
    �Having become part of Russia's first democratic government, in less than a year--in May 1991--Sergey Shoygu came up with the idea of putting together a Russian rescue corps. This idea was immediately supported by Yeltsin's entourage. Shoygu put together and took charge of a rescue corps consisting of enthusiasts like himself. Initially--within the Russian Goskomstroy system. 
    ��In August 1991, the President signed an edict creating the RSFSR State Committee on Emergencies, and on 19 November Shoygu was given "as a bonus" the cumbersome civil defense system (taken out from the USSR government system that was being gradually dismantled), while the new agency was renamed the Russian Committee of the Russian Federation on Civil Defense, Emergency Situations, and Elimination of the Consequences of Natural Disasters (GKChS). Finally, on 20 November 1994 the committee was reorganized into a ministry. Simultaneously, Shoygu was made a member of the Russian Security Council. 
     Shoygu's agency worked in "hot spots" of the post-Soviet space. In Tajikistan, engulfed in a bloody conflict, humanitarian caravans led by Russian rescue workers to the most remote corners of the Pamir foothills became one of the factors that prevented the disintegration of this country. In South Ossetia, aid from Russia became the salvation of numerous residents after military actions ended in 1992, when the republic had been devastated by the invasion of Zviad Gamsakhurdia's commandos. Moreover, at the time Shoygu became cochairman (from the Russian side) of a joint commission on the settlement of the Georgian- Ossetian armed conflict. In November 1992, when there was shooting not only in South Ossetia but on the Ossetian-Ingush border, where an interethnic conflict had just taken place--hundreds of dead and tens of thousands of refugees--Shoygu resolutely supported the harsh measures of conflict containment adopted at the initiative of Sergey Shakhray, vice premier and State Committee on Nationalities chairman. The GKChS head supported even such an unpopular step as "strict approval of information coming from the conflict zone into the mass media." 
    �Particularly memorable was an event in May 1993. A Russian GKChS convoy made its way to the city of Tkvarcheli, under siege by Georgians, to bring food and medicines for residents who had experienced throughout the whole winter the horrors of the blockade. Near Ochamvira, the convoy was fired upon by Georgian commandos. Shoygu, who personally oversaw the course of the operation, asked the Russian military on an open radio frequency to suppress the attackers with air and surface strikes. The convoy made it to the besieged city, and on the way back evacuated some of its residents to Russia despite obstacles being put up by the Georgian authorities in Sukhumi
    �But first, war came to Moscow. On 3 October 1993, the leadership of many thousands of volunteers, called up within hours by Yegor Gaydar, received from the GKChS 1,000 submachine guns with ammunition--on Sergey Shoygu's personal orders. Fortunately, matters did not get to the point of distributing the arms. 
    �In 1994, after the GKChS was renamed as the MChS, the ambitious Shoygu requested that his personnel be given military ranks and demanding 122 pairs of general's shoulder boards, and for himself--the rank of army general. In the end, the request was substantially cut, and the minister had to settle for major general. Over time, however, he rose in rank: Since December 1998, he has been a colonel general. He took as his first deputy Lieutenant General Valeriy Vostrotin, a Hero of the Soviet Union and a legendary spetsnaz officer, who in 1979 commanded the unit during the seizure of Amin's palace in Kabul
    �As early as 1995, the Russian Biography Institute named Shoygu the best minister in the RF Government. Shoygu is the recipient of the 1997 Andrey Pervozvannyy Prize, and in September 1998 the Russian Children's Fund and the International Association of Children's Funds awarded him the Order of the Holy Prince Dmitriy-- the patron of all needy children (the award was instituted in 1997 with the blessing of Aleksiy II, the patriarch of Moscow and all Russia); the MChS sponsors several orphanages, has organized the first in Russia cadet corps for rescue workers, and monitors the implementation of programs for aid to children suffering from the consequences of the Chernobyl disaster and other emergency situations... 
    �Shoygu's personal popularity helps to him to get the most in providing for his agency both materially and financially--to the envy of the Ministry of Defense and the MVD [Ministry of Internal Affairs]. But when in 1998 Shoygu's name showed up on the list of the richest people in Russia (published at the time by some mass media in connection with the Tax Inspectorate's intention to uncover all major tax evaders), the minister was genuinely surprised at this appraisal of his personal income and resources, having noted in one interview that he does not even rent a state dacha but has his own, rather modest, prefabricated house near Moscow. Very sensible: Naturally, it is best for a person who works much in a tense environment to rest in simple comfort built with one's own hands rather than in official grandeur. There are other reasons, too--for instance, preserving the image that the democratic leadership of Russia upheld before it acquired the full scope of power in the country and all the capabilities stemming from such power. 
     �Shoygu is not too anxious, however, to take part in public politics. In the fall of 1993, he was included in Russia's Choice's list of candidates for the State Duma, but he almost immediately withdrew his candidacy. In an interview for Literaturnaya Gazeta in September 1994, Shoygu said that it is hard for him to imagine himself joining any party or movement, or being a State Duma or Federation Council deputy. But in April 1995, the MChS head joined the organizing committee of Chernomyrdin's movement Our Home Is Russia. Apparently, he decided that this was the right thing to do: He knows the real value of political stability better than most active politicians in Russia
    �In 1994, enforcement agencies sent Yeltsin a collective complaint on the President's security adviser Yuriy Baturin, accusing him of exceeding his authority. The authors were Sergey Shoygu, Pavel Grachev, the then-commander of border troops Andrey Nikolayev, SVR [Foreign Intelligence Service] head Yevgeniy Primakov, FSK [Federal Counterintelligence Service] Director Sergey Stepashin, and FAPSI [Federal Government Communications and Information Agency] Director Aleksandr Starovoytov. After Baturin's explanations, most of the signatories withdrew their signatures; only Grachev (who counted on his closeness to Yeltsin) and Shoygu--a minister not too close to the President but popular in society-- stood by their opinion. 
     �Shoygu easily found a common language with General Lebed during the period of the latter's career surge in 1996. In appraising MChS activities, the Tiraspol and Khasavyurt peacemaker noted: "They do not make a noise here--they run their business, which is the way it should be in the country as a whole." 
    �In June 1998, Shoygu announced a very ambitious program of reorganizing his agency, which assumed creating on the basis of civil defense troops and search-and-rescue formations a new integrated structure--the State Rescue Service completely outside the armed forces. According to Shoygu, "this is much simpler than keeping thousands of not-much-needed military servicemen guarding themselves." It is assumed that a 200-man regiment will be guarding property, and in the event of war, be expanded into a 1,000-1,500- man brigade. The minister plans to cut the number of his agency's regional centers from nine to six, replace the current 36 military bases with 11 strong mobile rescue centers, and position aviation in four points instead of the current two. "Thus, both economy and higher mobility are achieved simultaneously," noted Shoygu.�  (Nezavisimaya Gazeta (Figury i Litsa Supplement) 8 May 99 No 9 p 9).]