IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE
EASTERN DISTRICT OF VIRGINIA
Alexandria Division

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA		)
					)
v.					)
					)		CRIMINAL NO.
ROBERT PHILIP HANSSEN,			)
a/k/a "B"				)
a/k/a "Ramon Garcia"			)
a/k/a "Jim Baker"			)
a/k/a "G. Robertson"			)

AFFIDAVIT IN SUPPORT OF
CRIMINAL COMPLAINT, ARREST WARRANT AND SEARCH WARRANTS

I, Stefan A. Pluta, being duly sworn, depose and state as follows:

1. I am presently employed as a Special Agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and am assigned to the Washington Field Office in the District of Columbia. I have been employed as an FBI Special Agent for approximately 13 years. I have completed FBI training in foreign counterintelligence matters. As a result of my training and experience, I am familiar with the tactics, methods, and techniques of foreign intelligence services and their agents.

2. This affidavit is in support of applications for the following:

3. In my capacity as case agent assigned to this matter, I have examined documents and other records pertinent to this investigation from numerous sources. Searches and various forms of surveillance have also been conducted pursuant to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) and orders of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC).

I. SUMMARY OF INVESTIGATION

4. The results of this investigation to date indicate that there is probable cause to believe that, beginning in 1985 and continuing to the present, ROBERT PHILIP HANSSEN (hereinafter "HANSSEN"), a United States citizen, has conspired with officers and agents of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (hereinafter "USSR" or "Soviet Union") and with its principal successor state, the Russian Federation (hereinafter "Russia") to commit espionage against the United States on behalf of a foreign government, specifically the Soviet Union or Russia, and has in fact engaged in such espionage.

5. The evidence establishes that between 1985 and the present, HANSSEN — who the KGB/SVR referred to as "B" — has engaged in the following conduct in violation of 18 U.S.C. §§794 (a) and (c):

II. KEY TERMS AND ENTITIES

6. The term counterintelligence means information gathered and activities conducted to protect against espionage, other intelligence activities, sabotage, or assassination conducted for or on behalf of foreign powers, organizations or persons.

7. The KGB (Komitet Gosudarstvenoy Bezopasnosti, or Committee for State Security) was the intelligence service of the former Soviet Union. The KGB's First Chief Directorate (FCD) was responsible for foreign intelligence, active measures, and counterintelligence. KGB FCD intelligence officers assigned to Soviet diplomatic missions could be assigned to Line KR (Foreign Counterintelligence), Line N (Illegals Operations), Line PR (Political), or Line X (Science and Technology), among others. The KGB's Second Chief Directorate (SCD) was responsible, among other things, for domestic counterintelligence, that is, counterintelligence activities within the Soviet Union. The KGB's Moscow headquarters was referred to as the Moscow Center.

8. Since December 1991, the SVR (Sluzhba Vneshney Razvedki Rossii, or Russian Foreign Intelligence Service) has been the Russian Federation's successor agency to the KGB's foreign intelligence arm.

9. The GRU (Glavnoye Razvedyvateinoye Upravlenie, or Chief Intelligence Directorate of the General Staff) was the military intelligence agency of the former Soviet Union, and continues to serve that function for the Russian Federation.

10. The Soviet/Russian Embassy in Washington, D.C., is located at 1125 16th Street, N.W.; the Soviet/Russian Diplomatic-Compound is located at 2650 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W. The KGB/SVR presence in a Soviet/Russian diplomatic mission is called the Rezidentura. headed by the KGB/SVR Rezident.

11. An agent-in-place is a person who remains in a position while acting under the direction of a hostile intelligence service, so as to obtain current intelligence information. It is also called a recruitment-in-place.

12. An illegal is an intelligence officer or a recruited agent who operates in a foreign country in the guise of a private person, and is often present under false identity.

13. A double agent is an agent engaged in clandestine activity for two or more intelligence services who provides information about one service to another.

14. A dead drop is a prearranged hidden location used for the clandestine exchange of packages, messages, and payments, which avoids the necessity of an intelligence officer and an agent being present at the same time.

15. A signal site is a prearranged fixed location, usually in a public place, on which an agent or intelligence officer can place a predetermined mark in order to alert the other to operational activity. Such a mark may be made by, for example, chalk or a piece of tape. The operational activity signaled may be the fact that a dead drop has been "loaded" and is ready to be "cleared." A call-out signal may be used to trigger a contact between an agent and an intelligence officer.

16. An accommodation address is a "safe" address, not overtly associated with intelligence activity, used by an agent to communicate with the intelligence service for whom he working.

17. The FBI has documented the use by the KGB/SVR of agents-in-place, illegals, double agents, dead drops, signal sites, call-out signals, and accommodation addresses, including their use in the Northern Virginia area, in the Eastern District of Virginia.

18. The United States Intelligence Community is the aggregation of those Executive Branch entities and programs that, in accordance with applicable United States law and the provisions of Executive Order 12333, conduct intelligence activities that are necessary for the conduct of foreign relations and the protection of the national security of the United States, and that make up the total national intelligence effort. It includes the FBI's National Security Division, the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), the National Security Agency (NSA), the National Reconnaissance Organization (NRO), the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), the Bureau of Intelligence and Research of the Department of State (DOS/INR), and the intelligence elements of the military service branches, among other entities.

19. The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), Title 50, United States Code, Sections 1801-1811 and 1821-1829, provides for electronic surveillance and searches within the United States directed at persons for whom there is probable cause to believe they are knowingly engaged in clandestine intelligence gathering activities for or on behalf of a foreign power, which activities involve or may involve a violation of the criminal statutes of the United States, as authorized by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC).

20. Aldrich Hazen Ames is a former CIA officer who in 1994 was arrested and subsequently pled guilty to having committed espionage as an agent of the KGB and SVR. Ames volunteered to the KGB in April 1985, and provided information to the KGB and the SVR until the date of his arrest in February 1994.

21. Classified information is defined by Executive Order 12958 and its predecessor orders (including E.O. 12356), as follows: information in any form that (1) is owned by, produced by or for, or under the control of the United States Government; (2) falls within one or more of the categories set forth in Section 1.5 of the Order (including intelligence sources or methods, cryptology, military plans, and vulnerabilities or capabilities of systems, installations, projects, or plans relating to the national security), and (3) is classified by an original classification authority who determines that its unauthorized disclosure reasonably could be expected to result in damage to the national security. Where such unauthorized release could reasonably result in "serious" damage, the information may be classified as SECRET. Where such damage is "exceptionally grave," the information may be classified TOP SECRET. Access to classified information at any level may be further restricted through compartmentation in SENSITIVE COMPARTMENTED INFORMATION (SCI) categories. Dissemination of classified information at any level may also be restricted through caveats such as: NOFORN (Not Releasable to Foreign Nationals), NOCONTRACT (Not Releasable to Contractors or Contractor/Consultants), WNINTEL (Warning Notice: Intelligence Sources and Methods Involved), and ORCON (Dissemination and Extraction of Information Controlled by Originator).

III. BACKGROUND OF ROBERT PHILIP HANSSEN

22. ROBERT PHILIP HANSSEN was born on April 18, 1944, in Chicago, Illinois, where he was raised. He is a United States citizen.

23. HANSSEN received an AB degree in Chemistry from Knox College, in Illinois, in 1966. He studied dentistry at Northwestern University, in Chicago, Illinois, from 1966 to 1968, and received an MBA degree in Accounting and Information Systems from Northwestern University in 1971. He became a Certified Public Accountant in 1973.

24. From 1971 to 1972, HANSSEN was employed as a junior accountant at an accounting firm in Chicago, Illinois. In 1972, HANSSEN joined the Chicago Police Department as an investigator in the Financial Section of the Inspection Services Division.

25. HANSSEN studied the Russian language during college.

26. On January 12, 1976, HANSSEN entered on duty as a Special Agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. He has served as an FBI Special Agent continuously since that date.

27. After initial training, HANSSEN was assigned to the FBI Field Office in Indianapolis, Indiana, and served on a White Collar Crime squad at the Resident Agency in Gary, Indiana, until August 1, 1978.

28. From August 2, 1978 to January 10, 1981, HANSSEN was assigned to the FBI Field Office in New York, New York, initially working on accounting matters in the Field Office's criminal division.

29. In March 1979, HANSSEN was detailed to the New York Field Office's intelligence division to help establish the FBI's automated counterintelligence data base in that office. At that time, this was a new automated database of information about foreign officials, including intelligence officers, assigned to the United States. Its contents were classified up to the SECRET level.

30. From January 12, 1981, to September 22, 1985, HANSSEN was assigned to FBI Headquarters in Washington, D.C., as a Supervisory Special Agent in the Intelligence Division. From January 1981 to August 1983, HANSSEN was assigned to the Budget Unit, which managed the FBI's portion of the United States Intelligence Community' s National Foreign Intelligence Program, and prepared budget justifications to Congress. This office had access to the full range of information concerning intelligence and counterintelligence activities involving FBI resources. From August 1983 until September 1985, HANSSEN was assigned to the Soviet Analytical Unit, which supported FBI FCI operations and investigations involving Soviet intelligence services, and provided analytical support to senior FBI management and the Intelligence Community.

While at FBI Headquarters, HANSSEN was assigned to the intelligence component of a particular highly-compartmented classified United States Government program. He also served on the FBI's FCI Technical Committee, which was responsible for coordinating technical projects relating to FCI operations.

31. From September 23, 1985, to August 2, 1987, HANSSEN was assigned to the intelligence division of the FBI Field Office in New York, New York, as supervisor of an FCI squad.

32. From August 3, 1987, to June 24, 1990, HANSSEN was reassigned to FBI Headquarters in Washington, D.C., where he again served as a Supervisory Special Agent in the Intelligence Division's Soviet Analytical Unit.

33. From June 25, 1990, to June 30, 1991, HANSSEN was assigned to the FBI Headquarter' s Inspections Staff as an Inspector's Aide. In this assignment he traveled to FBI Field Offices, Resident Agencies, and FBI Legal Attache offices in United States Embassies abroad.

34. On July 1, 1991, HANSSEN returned to the Intelligence Division at FBI Headquarters, where he served for six months in the Soviet Operations Section as a program manager in the unit responsible for countering efforts by the Soviets (and particularly the KGB's Line X) to acquire United States scientific and technical intelligence.

35. From January 6, 1992, to April 11, 1994, HANSSEN served as Chief of the National Security Threat List (NSTL) Unit in the Intelligence Division (renamed the National Security Division, or NSD, in 1993) at FBI Headquarters. There he focused the Unit's efforts on economic espionage.

36. In April 1994, HANSSEN was temporarily assigned to the FBI's Washington Metropolitan Field Office (now called Washington Field Office).

37. In December 1994, HANSSEN was reassigned to FBI Headquarters, in the Office of the Assistant Director for NSD.

38. From February 12, 1995, to January 12, 2001, HANSSEN was detailed to serve as the FBI's senior representative to the Office of Foreign Missions of the United States Department of State (DOS/OFM). In that position he functioned as the head of an interagency counterintelligence group within DOS/OFM, and as FBI's liaison to the State Department's Bureau of Intelligence and Research (DOS/INR). His office was in an area designated Suites 106, 107 and 108 of Room 2510C of the State Department building at 2201 C Street, N.W., Washington, D.C.

39. Effective January 13, 2001, HANSSEN was assigned to a newly-created position in the Information Resources Division, at FBI Headquarters, in order that the FBI could more effectively monitor his daily activities without alerting him to the ongoing investigation of his activities. His current office is Room 9930 of FBI Headquarters, 935 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C.

40. At no time during his employment with the FBI was HANSSEN ever authorized, directly or indirectly, to deliver, communicate, or transmit the classified information and documents described in this Affidavit to agents, officers, or employees of the KGB, SVR, or any other hostile foreign intelligence service.

41. On January 12, 1976, upon entering service with the FBI, HANSSEN signed an Oath of Office in which he swore that:

42. On January 12, 1976, HANSSEN also signed the FBI Pledge for Law Enforcement Officers, in which he pledged, in part, as follows:

43. On January 12, 1976, HANSSEN also signed an Employment Agreement in which he stated, in part:

44. HANSSEN received his initial TOP SECRET security clearance on January 12, 1976, and has held various SCI accesses since his initial SCI indoctrination on June 23, 1980.

45. On June 23, 1980, HANSSEN signed a Nondisclosure Agreement for Sensitive Compartmented Information, in which he acknowledged receiving a security indoctrination for a particular SCI program, and further acknowledged, among other things:

HANSSEN signed further iterations of this SCI Nondisclosure Agreement, in order to have access to additional SCI program information, on the following dates: October 1, 1981; March 1, 1982; September 9, 1983; April 10, 1985; and May 31, 1991.

46. On October 15, 1984, HANSSEN signed a Classified Information Nondisclosure Agreement in which he stated, in part:

47. From 1981 until 1985, HANSSEN owned a house and resided with his family on Whitecedar Court in Vienna, Virginia.

48. In approximately August 1987, after returning from his tour of duty in New York City, HANSSEN purchased a residence at 9414 Talisman Drive in Vienna, Virginia, where he and his family have lived continuously since.

IV. BASIS FOR THE INFORMATION IN THIS AFFIDAVIT

49. This Affidavit is based on numerous different types and sources of information, including the following:

A. Letters, and other forms of communications from "B" to the KGB/SVR, and from the KGB/SVR to "B";

B. A recording of a telephone conversation between "B" and a KGB/SVR officer;

C. Computer media, including hard drives and storage devices;

D. The actual plastic material that constituted the inner wrapping of a package that "B" passed to the KGB/SVR;

E. Information provided by former KGB/SVR personnel;

F. Records of the FBI, the CIA, and other agencies of the United States Intelligence Community;

G. The contents of an actual package that the KGB/SVR passed to "B";

H. Forensic testing and examination;

I. Interviews;

J. Physical searches and electronic surveillance conducted by the FBI pursuant to FISC authority;

K. Public records;

L. Other law enforcement and intelligence techniques, sources and methods; and

M. KGB/SVR operational and production files.

V. THE KGB's "B" OPERATION

50. The sources of information described in the foregoing section have established the following regarding "B":

51. On or about October 4, 1985, a KGB Line PR officer in Washington, D.C., named Viktor M. Degtyar, received an envelope by mail, at his residence in Alexandria, Virginia, in the Eastern District of Virginia. The envelope was postmarked "Prince George's Co, MD" on October 1, 1985. Inside was an inner envelope, marked: "DO NOT OPEN. TAKE THIS ENVELOPE UNOPENED TO VICTOR I. CHERKASHIN." At that time, Viktor Ivanovich Cherkashin was the Line KR Chief at the Soviet Embassy in Washington, D.C. Inside the inner envelope was an unsigned typed letter from the person whom the KGB came to call "B." The letter read in part as follows:

"B" proceeded to describe in detail a particular highly sensitive and classified information collection technique. In addition, "TO FURTHER SUPPORT MY BONA FIDES" he provided specific closely-held items of information regarding then-recent Soviet detectors. "B" added:

The information concerning the FBI's recruitment of Yuzhin, Motorin, and Martynov was classified at least at the SECRET level, as was the defector information. The sensitive information collection technique described above was classified at the TOP SECRET level.

52. Valeriy Fedorovich Martynov was a KGB Line X officer assigned to the Soviet Embassy in Washington, D.C., from October 1980 to November 1985. In April 1982, the FBI recruited Martynov to serve as an agent-in-place, and he was debriefed jointly by the FBI and the CIA. Martynov was compromised to the KGB by Ames in June 1985 and by "B" in October 1985, as described above. Based in part on the information provided by "B", the KGB directed Martynov to return to Moscow in November 1985, ostensibly to accompany KGB officer Vitaliy Yurchenko, who was returning to the Soviet Union after his August 1985 defection to the United States. Upon arriving in Moscow on or about November 7, 1985, Martynov was arrested, and he was subsequently tried on espionage charges. Martynov was convicted and executed.

53. Sergey Mikhailovich Motorin was a KGB Line PR officer assigned to the Soviet Embassy in Washington D.C., from June 1980 to January 1985. In January 1983, the FBI recruited Motorin to serve as an agent-in-place, and he was debriefed by the FBI. Motorin returned to Moscow at the end of his tour of duty in January 1985. Motorin, like Martynov, was compromised to the KGB by Ames in June 1985 and by "B" in October 1985, as described above. Based in part on the information "B" gave the KGB, Motorin was arrested in November or December 1985, tried and convicted on espionage charges during the period of October-November 1986, and executed in February 1987.

54. Boris Nikolayevich Yuzhin was a KGB Line PR officer assigned to San Francisco under cover as a student from 1975 to 1976, and then as a TASS correspondent from 1978 to 1982. The FBI recruited him to serve as an agent-in-place, and debriefed him. After returning to the Soviet Union, Yuzhin became the subject of an internal KGB investigation. Yuzhin was compromised to the KGB by Ames in June 1985 and by "B" in October 1985. Based in part on the information "B" gave the KGB, Yuzhin was arrested in December 1986, convicted of espionage, and sentenced to serve 15 years in prison. In 1992, he was released under a general grant of amnesty to political prisoners, and subsequently emigrated to the United States.

55. On or about October 15, 1985, Degtyar received by mail, at his residence in Alexandria, Virginia, in the Eastern District of Virginia, a package from "B" containing a large number of classified documents, including some original documents, of the United States Intelligence Community.

56. At 8:35 am on October 16, 1985, FBI surveillance personnel observed Degtyar arriving at the Soviet Embassy carrying a large black canvas bag which he did not typically carry.

57. Thereafter, Degtyar received by mail, at his residence in Alexandria, Virginia, in the Eastern District of Virginia, a typed message from "B," in an envelope bearing a handwritten address and postmarked "New York, NY" on October 24, 1985. The message included the following text:

The message established a date and times for the signals and drops, and concluded: "I will acknowledge amount with my next package."

The KGB designated this dead drop site by the codename "PARK". It is located in Fairfax County, Virginia, in the Eastern District of Virginia.

58. On Saturday, November 2, 1985, the KGB loaded the "PARK" dead drop site with $50,000 in cash and a message proposing procedures for future contacts with "B".

59. On or about November 8, 1985, Deglyar and Cherkashin received a typed letter from "B", which read in part as follows:

"B" then rejected the contact plans proposed by the KGB, and suggested a particular communications scheme based on "a microcomputer 'bulletin board'" at a designated location, with "appropriate encryption." Meanwhile, he wrote: "Let us use the same site again. Same timing. Same signals." "B" proposed that the next dead drop occur on "September 9" which, according to the "6" coefficient that he established with the KGB in his first letter, actually meant that the dead drop operation would take place on March 3, 1986.

"B" also wrote:

Referring to Yuzhin, Motorin, and Martynov, whom he had identified in his first letter as United States intelligence recruitments, "B" wrote:

In conclusion, "B" warned of a "new technique" used by NSA, which he described.

60. On March 3, 1986, the KGB loaded dead drop site "PARK", but "B" did not appear and the KGB removed its package from the dead drop site the same day.

61. On or about June 30, 1986, Deglyar received a typed letter from "B" at his residence in Alexandria, Virginia, in the Eastern District of Virginia. The letter read in part as follows:

"B" then described a United States Intelligence Community technical surveillance technique. He concluded:

"B" signed the letter: "Ramon".

According to the established "6" coefficient, the weeks the advertisement was actually to run were July 6, 1986, or July 13, 1986.

62. Viktor Gundarev was a KGB Line KR officer who defected to the United States on February 14, 1986. A classified FBI debriefing report, dated March 4, 1986, reports that FBI debrief ers showed Gundarev a photo of Cherkashin and asked if he knew Cherkashin.

63. The following advertisement appeared in the Washington Times from July 14, 1986, to July 18, 1986:

64. The number 703/451-9780 at that time belonged to a public telephone located in the vicinity of the Old Keene Mill Shopping Center, in Fairfax County, Virginia, in the Eastern District of Virginia. On Monday, July 21, 1986, "B" called that number and gave the number 628-8047. The call was taken by Aleksandr Kirillovich Fefelov, a KGB officer assigned to the Soviet Embassy in Washington, D.C.

65. One hour later, Fefelov telephoned 212/628-8047 and told "B" that the KGB had loaded the "PARK" dead drop site. The KGB mistakenly placed the package under the wrong corner of the wooden footbridge at the "PARK" site.

66. On or about August 7, 1986, Degtyar received a letter from "B" slating that he had not found the package at the dead drop site, and indicating that he would phone 703/451-9780 on August 18, 20, or 22. The KGB then retrieved its package from the "PARK" dead drop site.

67. On Monday, August 18, 1986, "B" telephoned 703/451-9780, and spoke with Fefelov. The latter portion of the conversation was recorded as follows: ([UI] = unintelligible)

According to the established "6" coefficient, the operation discussed in this conversation was actually scheduled to occur on August 19, 1986, at 7:00 am.

The KGB then loaded the "PARK" dead drop site with $10,000 in cash, as well as: proposals for two additional dead drop sites to be used by "B" and the KGB; a new accommodation address codenamed "NANCY"; and emergency communications plans for "B" to personally contact KGB personnel in Vienna, Austria. The "NANCY" address was the residence of KGB Line PR officer Boris M. Malakhov in Alexandria, Virginia, in the Eastern District of Virginia, who was to become Degtyar's replacement as the Soviet Embassy press secretary. "B" was instructed to mis-spell Malakhov's name as "Malkow." "B" subsequently cleared the dead drop.

68. Thereafter, Degtyar received an envelope at his residence in Alexandria, Virginia, in the Eastern District of Virginia. The envelope bore a handwritten address and return address: "Ramon Garcia, 125 Main St, Falls Church VA." It was postmarked from "NO VA MSC 22081" on August 19, 1986. MSC designates the Merrifield Service Center, located in the Eastern District of Virginia. Inside the envelope was a handwritten note: "RECEIVED $10,000. RAMON."

69. On or about September II, 1987, Malakhov received an envelope at his residence in the Eastern District of Virginia. The envelope bore a handwritten address to "B.N. MALKOW" at the "NANCY" address, and a handwritten return address of "R. GARCIA, 125 MAIN ST, ALEXANDRIA, VA", and was postmarked September 8, 1987. Inside was the following typed letter:

According to the established "6" coefficient, the dates referred to in this letter were actually September 10, 12, and 16.

70. On Monday, September 14, 1987, the KGB received in the mail a package of documents including TOP SECRET National Security Council documents.

71. On Tuesday, September 15, 1987, the KGB loaded the "PARK" dead drop site with $10,000 cash. The KGB also proposed two additional dead drop sites, one codenamed "AN" located in Ellanor C. Lawrence Park in Western Fairfax County, in the Eastern District of Virginia, and another codenamed "DEN" at a different location farther away. The KGB proposed that "B" load the dead drop at "PARK" or "AN" on September 26, 1987, and that the KGB respond by loading "DEN".

72. On Wednesday, September 16, 1987, the KGB determined that "B" had cleared the "PARK" dead drop and removed the signal 73. On September 26, 1987, the KGB recovered from the "PARK" dead drop site a package from "B". The package contained a handwritten letter reading as follows:

"B" then suggested an exchange procedure involving a parked car instead of a dead drop site, and a related communications procedure, but stated: "If you cannot do this I will clear this once ‘AN' on your scheduled date (rather than the other)." He then asked the KGB to "Find a comfortable Vienna VA signal site to call me to an exchange any following Monday." He closed the letter, "Good luck with your work", and signed it "Ramon."

The package also contained a document which the KGB described as having the title which roughly translates into English as: "National Intelligence Program for 87".

74. Thereafter, the KGB proposed to "B" a signal site in Vienna, Virginia, in the Eastern District of Virginia, on the post of a stop sign on the shoulder of Courthouse Road near its junction with Locust Street. This signal site was referred to as "V".

75. On September 29, 1987, the KGB deposited $100,000 into an escrow account established for "B" in a Soviet bank in Moscow.

76. On November 10, 1987, Malakhov received a letter from "B" at his residence in the Eastern District of Virginia. The envelope bore a return address of "J. Baker" in "Chicago" and was postmarked on November 7, 1987. In the letter, "B" advised that Saturday for "AN" was not suitable, and he postponed the operation for two days, until Monday, November 16. He advised that he had an urgent package for the KGB, and asked the KGB to place a signal confirming receipt of the letter. That same day, the KGB placed a signal at the "PARK" signal site.

Thereafter, whenever "B" used the word "Chicago" in a return address, it was to signal that he intended for a dead drop exchange to occur the following Monday.

77. On Sunday, November 15, 1987, the KGB loaded the "AN" dead drop site with a package. It was not cleared by "B" and, on November 17, the KGB removed the package.

78. On Thursday, November 19, 1987, the KGB received a handwritten letter from "B". The envelope bore a return address of "G. Robertson" in "Houston" and was postmarked on November 17, 1987. The letter read as follows:

79. On Monday, November 23, 1987, "B" and the KGB carried out an exchange operation at the "PARK" dead drop site. The package from "B" to the KGB contained: a cable-type report about a meeting in October 1987 with a valuable source, whom the KGB referred to as "M"; a survey of information provided by Vitaliy Yurchenko; and an official technical document describing COINS-II.

In 1987, COINS-II was the then-current version of the United States Intelligence Community's "Community On-Line Intelligence System," which constituted a classified Community-wide intranet.

The package from the KGB to "B" contained $20,000 cash and a letter conveying "regards" from the KGB Director and advising that $100,000 had been deposited in a bank at 6-7% interest. The letter also asked "B" for a variety of specific classified information. The KGB gave "B" two new accommodation addresses and asked "B" to propose new dead drop sites.

80. On February 4, 1988, the KGB received a note from "B" at one of the new accommodation addresses it had given to "B" in the November 23, 1987, dead drop. The address was the residence of a Soviet diplomatic official known to the FBI as a KGB co-optee, located in the Eastern of Virginia. The note read simply: "OK". It was in an envelope bearing a return address of "Jim Baker" in "Langley" and postmarked in Washington, D.C., on February 3, 1988.

81. On Monday, February 8, 1988, "B" and the KGB carried out an exchange operation at the "PARK" dead drop site in Nottoway Park, which the KGB had now renamed "PRIME". The package from "B" to the KGB contained a typed, unsigned letter. In the letter, "B" acknowledged receipt of $20,000 and identified two additional drop sites. He then went on to provide detailed information concerning a Soviet detector, and advised the KGB that he had arranged time to review the detector's file. "A full report will follow as soon as possible." He then disclosed to the KGB certain specific information concerning the United States Intelligence Community's communication intelligence capabilities.

Enclosed with the letter was the first computer diskette "B" passed to the KGB. Also in the package from "B" were classified documents.

The package from the KGB to "B" contained $25,000 cash, and a letter conveying thanks of the KGB Chairman, Vladimir Kryuchkov, for the information about the valuable source "M". The KGB also asked "B" for more information about "M" and the "agent network" in New York City, and about a particular KGB officer.

On the next day, February 9, 1988, the KGB observed that the signal at "PARK/PRIME" had been removed, indicating that "B" had cleared the dead drop.

82. On March 16, 1988, the KGB received a second computer diskette from "B" at an accommodation address in the Eastern District of Virginia. The envelope bore a return address of "Jim Baker" in "Chicago" and was postmarked in Washington, D.C., on March 15, 1988.

83. On March 17, 1988, the KGB received a letter from "B" at an accommodation address in the Eastern District of Virginia. The envelope bore a return address of "Jim Baker" in "Chicago" and was postmarked in Northern Virginia on March 16, 1988. In the letter, "B" instructed the KGB to use the "PARK/PRIME" dead drop site until the KGB approved the other sites.

84. On Monday, March 21, 1988, the KGB observed a signal from "B" at the "PARK/PRIME" site, but was unable to check the dead drop site because strangers were present in the park.

85. On March 26, 1988, the KGB received a third computer diskette from "B" at an accommodation address in the Eastern District of Virginia. The envelope bore a return address of "Jim Baker" in "Chicago" and was postmarked in Washington, D.C., on March 24, 1988. The KGB found no text on the diskette, which it referred to as "D-3".

86. On Monday, March 28, 1988, "B" and the KGB carried out an exchange operation at the "PARK/PRIME" dead drop site.

The package from "B" to the KGB included his fourth computer diskette ("D-4"), a TOP SECRET document entitled "The FBI's Double Agent Program" and a document that the KGB described as a Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) document entitled "Stealth Orientation."

The package from the KGB to "B" included $25,000 cash and a letter explaining why the KGB had not been able to check the "PARK/PRIME" dead drop site on March 21. In the letter, the KGB also advised it had been unable to read the diskettes "B" had passed to the KGB. The KGB asked "B" for information about codes and cryptograms, intelligence support for the Strategic Defense Initiative, submarines, and other classified material.

The next day, the KGB observed that "B" had removed the signal from the "PARK/PRIME" site, indicating he had removed the package.

87. On April 4, 1988, the KGB received an envelope from "B" at an accommodation address in the Eastern District of Virginia. The envelope bore a return address of "Jim Baker" in "Alexandria" and was postmarked in Northern Virginia, on March 31, 1988. The envelope contained a note from "B" reading: "use 40 TRACK MODE. this letter is not a signal."

The term "use 40-track mode" refers to a technical process for re-formatting a computer diskette in order to conceal data by putting the data onto specific tracks on the diskette. Unless a person uses the correct codes to decrypt such a diskette, the diskette would appear to be blank.

88. On April 6, 1988, the KGB received a package from "B" at an accommodation address in the Eastern District of Virginia. The envelope bore a return address of "Jim Baker" in "Fairfax" and a postmark of "MSC NO VA" (Merrifield Service Center, Northern Virginia, in the Eastern District of Virginia) on April 5. The package contained a fifth diskette ("D-5"). On the diskette, "B" provided what the KGB characterized as "everything" about a particular KGB officer, additional information about a KGB defector named Victor Sheymov, and information about two specific Soviet FBI recruitments. "B" also explained why the KGB had been unable to read his diskettes. "B" also asked the KGB for diamonds. The KGB subsequently purchased several diamonds for use in the "B" operation.

89. On May 24, 1988, the KGB received a letter from "B" at an accommodation address in the District of Columbia. The envelope bore a return address of "Jim Baker" in "Chicago" and was postmarked in "MSC NO VA" on May 17, 1988. With the letter was "B"'s sixth diskette ("D-6"), which contained information about a number of matters. The diskette also contained information about a specific recent FBI Soviet recruitment operation.

90. On Monday, May 30, 1988, a KGB officer arrived at the "PARK/PRIME" dead drop site at 9:03 pm, three minutes after the end of the prearranged dead drop exchange period. The KGB officer saw a man who apparently removed the signal, got into hi; car, and drove away.

91. On July 15, 1988, the KGB received a letter from "B" a an accommodation address in the Eastern District of Virginia. The envelope bore a return address "Chicago" and was postmarked "WDC 200" on July 13, 1988. The zip codes for Washington, D.C., begin "200". The typed letter read as follows:

92. On Monday, July 18, 1988, "B" and the KGB carried out an exchange operation at the "PARK/PRIME" dead drop site.

The package from "B" contained over 530 pages of material, including:

The package from the KGB to "B" contained $25,000 cash and a letter asking for information about surveillance systems, the agent network in New York City, illegal intelligence, and several specific FBI recruitment operations. The KGB proposed two new dead drop and related signal sites. One, named "BOB", was under a footbridge in Idylwood Park, between Vienna and Falls Church, in the Eastern District of Virginia. The other, named "CHARLIE", was under a footbridge in Eakin Community Park, south of Vienna, in the Eastern District of Virginia. For these dead drop sites, the KGB instructed "B" to load the dead drops by 9:00 pm on the designated day; the KGB would clear it by 10:00 pm and load it with a package which "B" was to clear after 10:00 pm.

93. On July 31, 1988, the KGB received an envelope from "B" at an accommodation address in the Eastern District of Virginia. The envelope bore a return address of Alexandria and contained a letter dated July 29 and "B"'s seventh diskette ("D-7"), which contained information on technical surveillance systems, a new recruitment in New York City, illegal intelligence, and several other specific Soviet recruitment targets.

94. On August 22, 1988, the KGB deposited $50,000 in an escrow account for "B" at a Moscow bank.

95. On September 21, 1988, the KGB received an envelope from "B" at an accommodation address in the Eastern District of Virginia. The envelope bore a return address of "Chicago" and was postmarked "WDC" on September 20. The envelope contained "B"'s eighth diskette ("D-8") and a note that read: "At BOB". The diskette contained information about particular Soviet recruitment targets of the FBI.

96. On Monday, September 26, 1988, "B" and the KGB carried out an exchange operation at the "BOB" dead drop site.

The package from "B" contained approximately 300 pages of material, including an FBI memo about a particular individual believed at the time to be a KGB Line KR officer in New York City, information on technical means of Soviet intelligence, a transcript of a Counterintelligence Group meeting, and information on several other matters.

The package from the KGB contained a diamond valued at $24,720, and a letter advising "B" that $50,000 had been deposited in his account. The letter also expressed gratitude to "B" from the KGB Chairman (Vladimir A. Kryuchov). The letter also discussed communications procedures, security measures, a personal meeting, and passports. It also asked "B" to provide information about classified technical operations in the Soviet Union, agent network details, allies' sources, FBI programs, past cases, and a certain missile technology.

97. On December 1, 1988, the KGB received a package from "B" at an accommodation address in the Eastern District of Virginia. It bore a return address of "G. Robertson, Baker's Photo" and was postmarked "WDC" on November 30, 1988. The package contained a letter and his ninth diskette ("D-9"), which contained information about a number of classified matters.

98. On Monday, December 26, 1988, "B" and the KGB carried out an exchange operation at the "CHARLIE" dead drop site in the Eastern District of Virginia.

The package from "B" contained his tenth diskette ("D-IO") and approximately 356 pages of material. On the diskette, "B" provided additional classified information. He also provided six recent National HUMINT Collection Plan (NHCP) documents, and a document whose title the KGB noted as "Soviet Armed Forces and Capabilities for Conducting Strategic Nuclear War Until the End of the 1990s."

The package from the KGB to "B" contained $10,000 cash, a second diamond, valued at $17,748, and a message in which the KGB asked "B" for additional specific information about a wide variety of classified technical and recruitment matters.

The next day, the KGB observed that the signal at the "CHARLIE" site had been removed, indicating "B" had removed the KGB's package.

99. On Tuesday, January 31, 1989, the KGB observed an emergency call-out signal at a signal site that it had issued to "B", located at the intersection of Q Street and Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. By prearrangement, the KGB immediately unloaded a package from "B" at the "BOB" dead drop site. The package contained a cable, with a note reading: "Send to the Center right away. This might be useful." Also in the package was "B"'s eleventh diskette ("D-ll"), which contained comments on the cable, as well as information on several specific individuals about whom the KGB had asked for information.

100. On Thursday, March 16, 1989, "B" marked a call-out signal site that the KGB has issued to him, located at the Taft Bridge in Northwest Washington, D.C.

101. On Monday, March 20, 1989, "B" and the KGB carried out an exchange operation at the "CHARLIE" dead drop site in the Eastern District of Virginia.

"B" passed two packages to the KGB. One contained a TOP SECRET SCI document entitled "DCI Guidance for the National MASINT Intelligence Program (FY 1991-FY 2000)," prepared by the Measurement and Signature Intelligence (MASINT) Committee and dated November 1988. The document bears the caveats NOFORN and NOCONTRACT, and contains the following preface:

Warning Notice
Intelligence Sources or Methods Involved
(WNINTEL)
NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION
Unauthorized Disclosure Subject to Criminal Sanctions

According to its Introduction, this document contains the MASINT Committee's recommendations to the DCI for the collection, processing, and reporting of MASINT, and represents the Intelligence Community's consensus on specific MASINT objectives and studies leading to needed capabilities. Its contents are highly specific and technical. In passing this document to the KGB, "B" requested that it be returned.

The second package from "B" to the KGB contained his twelfth computer diskette ("D-12") and approximately 539 pages of materials including classified information on a variety of matters.

The KGB package to "B" contained $18,000 cash and a third diamond, valued at $11,700. It also-contained a letter that confirmed the KGB had received "B"'s packages on December 26 and January 31, discussed a personal meeting, requested new dead drop sites, and asked how to increase operational security. The KGB also asked "B" about his security precautions for the diamonds. ("B" told the KGB that he would say the diamonds came from his grandmother.) The KGB also asked for information about a wide variety of technical and operational subjects. The KGB thanked "B" for the information he provided on January 31, and asked him "for everything else that's possible."

On Tuesday, March 21, 1989, the KGB observed that the signal at "CHARLIE" had been removed, indicating that "B" had removed the KGB's package.

102. On March 24, 1989, the KGB marked the "V" signal site on Courthouse Road in Vienna, in the Eastern District of Virginia, indicating that "B" should pick up a package at the "PARK/PRIME" dead drop site the following Monday. On Monday, March 27, 1989, the KGB loaded the dead drop with the MASINT document, for return to "B", but "B" did not clear the drop.

103. In April 1989, the KGB presented several awards to KGB officers involved in the "B" operation, including the highly- coveted Order of the Red Banner, the Order of the Red Star, and the Medal for Excellent Service.

104. On Monday, May 22, 1989, after a call-out signal from "B", he and the KGB carried out an exchange operation at the "BOB" dead drop site, in the Eastern District of Virginia.

The package "B" passed to the KGB contained the first and third diamonds the KGB had given to him and which "B" returned for cash, and his thirteenth diskette ("D-13") in which he suggested an account in Switzerland and bonds to be transferred to it. The package also contained approximately 80 pages of material, including a document whose title the KGB noted as "National Intelligence Program 90-91." The diskette contained classified information about a variety of technical and operational matters.

"B" also provided information about United States Foreign Officer Felix Bloch and an illegal in Vienna, Austria. This disclosure compromised the FBI's then-ongoing espionage investigation of Bloch, as described below.

The package that the KGB passed to "B" on May 22, 1989, did not contain a payment, but in a letter the KGB promised to do so the next time. The KGB also returned the MASINT Committee document, and described its two prior failed efforts to return it.

The next day, the KGB observed that the signal associated with the "BOB" dead drop site had been removed, indicating that "B" had retrieved the KGB's package.

105. Felix Bloch had been identified as an associate of Austria-based known Soviet illegal Reino Gikman on the basis of a telephone call between them on April 27, 1989. One day later, the FBI opened a classified investigation of Bloch, who at the time was assigned to the State Department in Washington, D.C. Meetings between Bloch and Gikman were observed in Paris on May 14, 1989, and Brussels on May 28, 1989. In early June 1989, after "B" had compromised the Bloch investigation, Gikman suddenly left for Moscow. Early on the morning of June 22, 1989, Bloch received a telephone call at his home in Washington, D.C., from a man identifying himself as "Ferdinand Paul". According to a recording of that call, "Ferdinand Paul" told Bloch that he was calling "in behalf of Pierre" who "cannot see you in the near future" because "he is sick", and that "a contagious disease is suspected." (Bloch knew Gikman as "Pierre".) "Paul" then told Bloch: "I am worried about you. You have to take care of yourself." Having concluded that this call alerted Bloch that his association with Gikman had been compromised, the FBI interviewed Bloch on June 22 and 23, 1989. Bloch denied he had engaged in espionage and ultimately declined to answer any further questions. The FBI was unable further to develop its investigation of Bloch.

106. On Monday, August 7, 1989, after two call-out signals from "B", he and the KGB carried out an exchange operation at the "CHARLIE" dead drop site in the Eastern District of Virginia.

In the package from "B" were five rolls of film containing a highly-restricted TOP SECRET/SCI analysis of the foreign threat to a specific and named highly-compartmented United States Government program, dated May 1987.

Also in the package from "B" was his fourteenth diskette ("D-14"), which contained information from the Bloch-Gikman file, and several FBI recruitment attempts. "B" approved a new dead drop site the KGB had proposed, codenamed "DORIS", located under a footbridge in Canterbury Park in Springfield, Virginia, in the Eastern District of Virginia.

The KGB's package to "B" contained $30,000 cash and a letter promising to compensate him for the returned diamonds. The KGB rejected his suggestions for an account in Switzerland. The KGB discussed communications plans, and proposed a new dead drop site, codenamed "ELLIS", under a footbridge over Wolftrap Creek near Creek Crossing Road at Foxstone Park, near Vienna, Virginia, in the Eastern District of Virginia, with a signal site on the "Foxstone Park" sign.

The next day, the KGB observed that the signal associated with the "CHARLIE" dead drop site had been removed, indicating that "B" had retrieved the KGB's package.

107. On August 17, 1989, the KGB deposited $50,000 into an escrow account established for "B" in a Soviet bank in Moscow.

108. On Monday, September 25, 1989, "B" and the KGB carried out an exchange operation at the "DORIS" dead drop site in the Eastern District of Virginia.

The package from "B" to the KGB contained approximately 80 pages of material including part of a document concerning a highly-sensitive United States technical operation classified at the TOP SECRET/SCI level. In passing this document, "B" compromised a program of enormous value, expense, and importance to the United States. Also in the package was his fifteenth diskette ("D-15"), containing additional classified information.

The package from the KGB to "B" contained $30,000 cash, a letter, and, for the first time from the KGB, a computer diskette.

The next day, the KGB observed that the signal associated with the "CHARLIE" dead drop site had been removed, indicating that "B" had retrieved the KGB's package.

109. On October 2, 1989, the KGB received a letter from "B" at an accommodation address in the Eastern District of Virginia. It bore a return address of "G. Robertson, 1408 Ingeborg Ct., McLean VA" and was postmarked "NO VA" on October 28, 1989. The letter reported that: "The disk is clean. I tried all methods -- completely demagnetized."

110. On October 17, 1989, the KGB received an envelope from "B" at an accommodation address, in the Eastern District of Virginia. It bore a return address of "G. Robertson, 1101 Kingston Ct., Houston, TX" and was postmarked "NO VA MSC 220" on October 16, 1989. The envelope contained "B"'s sixteenth diskette ("D-16").

111. On Monday, October 23, 1989, "B" and the KGB carried out an exchange operation at the "ELLIS" dead drop site in the Eastern District of Virginia.

The package from "B" to the KGB contained an exact duplicate of the sixteenth diskette ("D-16"), which "B" had sent by mail the week before. The diskette contained additional classified information about technical and recruitment matters. "B" requested the KGB to load the "ELLIS" dead drop site at any time, and advised that he would check the signal site periodically about the loading.

The package from the KGB t.o "B" contained $55,000 cash and a letter advising "B" that $50,000 had been deposited into his escrow account in Moscow. "B" never signaled that he had cleared this dead drop, and on October 26 the KGB retrieved its package.

112. On Tuesday, October 31, 1989, the KGB loaded the "ELLIS" dead drop site with a package containing the $55,000 cash and a second KGB diskette. The diskette provided a new accommodation address, and instructions to "B" on how to inform the KGB which materials should be opened by the KGB in Washington, D.C., and which should go to the Center. It conveyed regards from the KGB Chairman and made extensive requests for additional information concerning particular United States intelligence activities targeting the Soviet Union. On November 11, 1989, the KGB observed that the "ELLIS" signal site was removed, indicating that "B" had removed the KGB's package.

113. On Monday, December 25, 1989, after a call-out signal from "B", he and the KGB carried out an exchange operation at the "BOB" dead drop site in the Eastern District of Virginia.

The package from "B" to the KGB contained his seventeenth diskette ("D-17") and several documents including a DCI National Intelligence Estimate entitled "The Soviet System in Crisis: Prospects for the Next Two Years" and dated November 1989. This document was classified SECRET, bore the caveats NOFORN NOCONTRACT WNINTEL, and contained the notice: "Unauthorized Disclosure Subject to Criminal Sanctions." He also provided additional documents on the highly sensitive technical operation referred to above.

The diskette contained a message in which "B" complimented the KGB's efficient actions, and provided current information about: several ongoing FBI recruitment operations against Soviet intelligence officers; three new tightly-protected FBI sources within the KGB and other Soviet entities; and four detectors. He also provided updated information on the Bloch-Gikman matter.

The package from the KGB to "B" contained $38,000 cash as payment for the October 16-23 period plus compensation for the two returned diamonds, and two KGB diskettes. The diskettes contained Christmas greetings from the KGB, discussed communications plans, and asked "B" for specific information about a variety of classified technical operations.

114. On Monday, March 5, 1990, after a call-out signal from "B", he and the KGB carried out an exchange operation at the "CHARLIE" dead drop site in the Eastern District of Virginia.

The package from "B" to the KGB contained his eighteenth diskette ("D-18"), on which "B" provided classified information on a wide variety of topics, including: four Soviet nationals, a KGB officer, a Soviet illegal, and two KGB detectors, who were all serving as FBI-CIA sources; communications intelligence operations; and the identification of a particular named NSA employee and the sensitive office in which the employee worked. The package also contained a 120-page document whose title, according to KGB records, was "Soviet Armed Forces and Strategic Nuclear Capabilities for the 1990s," dated February 1990.

The package from the KGB contained $40,000 cash and a KGB diskette. The diskette discussed communications plans and asked "B" to provide information on a wide variety of classified technical, operational, and recruitment matters. The KGB also asked "B" what the Soviets could use of the certain highly classified and sensitive program information he had previously disclosed.

115. On Monday, May 7, 1990, after a call-out signal from "B", he and the KGB carried out an exchange operation at the "DORIS" dead drop site in the Eastern District of Virginia.

The package from "B" to the KGB contained his nineteenth diskette ("D-19") and approximately 232 pages of material, including another document on the tightly-compartmented classified program that was the subject of the document "B" passed to the KGB on August 7, 1989. "B" also gave the KGB permission to use the certain highly classified and sensitive program information he had previously disclosed.

"B" also advised that because of a promotion he would be traveling for one year, and he discussed communications plans and a method of renewing contact.

The package from the KGB to "B" contained $35,000 cash and a KGB diskette. The diskette contained communications plans, and identified a new dead drop site, codenamed "FLO", located under a footbridge in Lewinsville Park near the intersection of Warner Avenue and Westbury Road in McLean, Virginia, in the Eastern District of Virginia, and a nearby signal site. The diskette also contained specific requests for information, including operational leads and materials on recruitments of Soviets. It read, in part, as follows:

116. On or about May 17, 1990, the KGB received a letter and a diskette from "B" at an accommodation address in the Eastern District of Virginia.

117. On Monday, May 21, 1990, the KGB loaded the "ELLIS" dead drop site with a package containing two KGB diskettes, and marked a call-out signal for "B." "B" picked up the KGB's package, but did not leave one for the KGB.

The KGB diskettes contained a letter that discussed in detail communications plans and recontact procedures. It read, in part:

The KGB particularly asked "B" to "give us some good leads to possible recruitments" among "interesting people in the right places." The KGB also asked for information about a Soviet Embassy employee who "B" had previously identified as an FBI recruitment-in-place, and who the KGB believed was about to defect.

118. On August 20, 1990, the KGB received from "B" an envelope, containing his twentieth diskette ("D-20"), at an accommodation address in the Eastern District of Virginia. The envelope bore the return address "J. Baker, Box 1101, Alexandria VA". The diskette contained classified information about several matters. "B" instructed the KGB to load the "FLO" dead drop site on September 3, 1990.

119. On Monday, September 3, 1990, the KGB loaded the "FLO" dead drop site with a package containing $40,000 cash, and a KGB diskette containing a letter which identified more call-out signal sites and contained numerous specific requests for classified information. The letter noted that some of the materials "B" had provided about "political issues of interest . . . were reported to the very top." "B" subsequently picked up the KGB's package.

120. On Saturday, February 2, 1991, in response to an emergency call-out signal from "B", the KGB retrieved a package from "B" at the "CHARLIE" dead drop site in the Eastern District of Virginia. The package contained "B"'s twenty-first diskette ("D-21"), which included a letter in which "B" acknowledged receipt of the $40,000, which he characterized as "too generous." He disclosed to the KGB that the FBI's chief of counterintelligence in the New York Field Office had told him that the FBI had recruited a specific number of sources at a particular Soviet establishment. "B" also advised that he would be ready for an operation on February 18, 1991.

In exchange, the KGB left a package for "B" but he did not pick it up and the KGB later retrieved it.

121. On Monday, February 18, 1991, the KGB loaded the "CHARLIE" dead drop site with a package containing $10,000 cash and a KGB diskette. The diskette established two new dead drop sites, one of which was codenamed "GRACE" and located under a footbridge in Rock Creek Park in Washington, D.C. It also asked "B" to provide specific classified technical and operational information, and instructed that the next contact would be at the "DORIS" dead drop site.

122. On Monday, April 15, 1991, in response to a call-out signal from "B", he and the KGB carried out an exchange operation at the "DORIS" dead drop site in the Eastern District of Virginia.

The package from "B" to the KGB contained his twenty-second diskette ("D-22") in which he confirmed receipt of cash. "B" also provided classified FBI material about a specific recruitment operation about which the KGB had previously asked. The package from the KGB to "B" contained $10,000 and a KGB diskette which read, in part, as follows:

The KGB asked "B" for information about several specific classified matters, including United States Intelligence Community plans to respond to domestic turmoil in the Soviet Union and new United States communications intelligence efforts.

123. On Monday, July 15, 1991, after a call-out signal from "B", he and the KGB carried out an exchange operation at the "ELLIS" dead drop site in the Eastern District of Virginia.

The package from "B" to the KGB contained his twenty-third diskette ("D-23") and approximately 284 pages of material. The diskette read, in part: "I returned, grabbed the first thing I could lay my hands on" and " I was in a hurry so that you would not worry, because June has passed, they held me there longer." He also noted that he had at least five years until retirement, and remarked: "Maybe I will hang in there for that long." "B" also reported on a particular FBI-CIA operation. The classified documents passed by "B" included FBI documents, human intelligence plans, and documents concerning nuclear and missile weapons proliferation.

The package from the KGB to "B" contained $12,000 cash and a KGB diskette reading, in part, as follows:

The KGB gave "B" new communications plans, and numerous specific requests for classified technical, operational, and recruitment matters. The KGB also asked follow-up questions about information "B" had previously provided, and requested specific United States Intelligence Community activity towards the Soviet Union.

124. On Monday, August 19, 1991, after a call-out signal from "B", he and the KGB carried out an exchange operation at the "FLO" dead drop site in the Eastern District of Virginia.

The package from "B" to the KGB contained a recent FBI memorandum concerning specific methods of surveillance of a particular Soviet intelligence officer. It also contained "B"'s twenty-fourth diskette ("D-24") on which he discussed communications plans and provided information about classified technical and operational matters. On this diskette, he also discussed how the Soviet Union could benefit from a thorough study of the period of Chicago' s history when the city was governed by Mayor Richard J. Daley.

The package from the KGB to "B" contained $20,000 cash and a message welcoming "B" back and advising that the next exchange would be at the "GRACE" dead drop site.

125. On Monday, October 7, 1991, after a call-out signal from "B", he and the KGB carried out an exchange operation at the "GRACE" dead drop site in the Eastern District of Virginia.

The package from "B" to the KGB contained his twenty-fifth diskette ("D-25") and a classified document entitled "The US Double-Agent Program Management Review and Policy Recommendations" dated September 10, 1991. On the diskette, "B" provided information about various classified recruitment operations. "B" also identified by name a particular "old friend" whom he suggested the KGB try to recruit; he explained that the man was a military officer who had recently been told he would not be promoted.

The package from the KGB to "B" contained $12,000 cash and a KGB diskette reading, in part, as follows:

The KGB provided new communications plans and asked "B" for specific information about a variety of classified technical, operational, and analytical matters. The KGB also asked for the current 1991 issue of a particular document reporting on Soviet knowledge of United States satellite reconnaissance systems, commenting that: "It's fun to read about the life in the Universe to understand better what's going on on our own planet." Asking about some pages that appeared to be missing from "B"'s July package, the KGB noted: "Sometimes it happens, we understand. Life is becoming too fast."

126. On December 12, 1991, the KGB received an envelope from "B" at an accommodation address in Alexandria, Virginia, in the Eastern District of Virginia. The envelope, which was addressed by hand, bore a handwritten return address of "J. Baker, Box 1101, Houston, TX" and was postmarked Washington, D.C. The envelope contained a handwritten note reading: "— @ BOB on 6/22; T. DEVICE APPROVED 6/16, COMING SOON". Using the established "6" coefficient, the reference to "6/22" actually refers to December 16. The reference to "T. DEVICE" related to information "B" had previously passed to the KGB regarding a classified technical operation.

127. On Monday, December 16, 1991, "B" and the KGB carried out an exchange operation at the "BOB" dead drop site in the Eastern District of Virginia.

The package from "B" to the KGB contained several documents, including:

The package from "B" also contained his twenty-sixth diskette ("D-26") in which he expressed embarrassment over the pages missing from his earlier package, and advised that he had been promoted to a position of increased salary and authority that had moved him temporarily out of direct responsibility for Soviet matters. He noted that a new mission for his new group had not yet been defined, and he quoted a particular remark by General Patton about the Japanese. "B" discussed communications plans, and provided information about various classified technical and operational matters. He also proposed a new communications system, in which he would set up an office at a location in town not subject to electronic surveillance, where he and the KGB could communicate directly using a computer that would be specially-equipped with certain advanced technology.

The package from the KGB to "B" contained $12,000 cash and a KGB diskette discussing communications plans and asking for specific information about various classified matters.

128. In one message to "B" the KGB warned him to: "Examine from the point of security Your practice of copying materials."

129. On or before October 6, 1999, "B" received the following letter from the SVR:

The initials "V. K." are those of a known SVR Line KR senior officer in Washington, D.C.

130. On or before March 14, 2000, "B" wrote a letter to the SVR, reading, in part, as follows:

131. On or before June 8, 2000, "B" wrote a letter to the SVR which read, in part, as follows:

132. On or before July 31, 2000, "B" received the following letter from the KGB/SVR:

133. On or before November 17, 2000, "B" wrote a letter to the KGB/SVR, reading, in part, as follows:

134. On the evening of Tuesday, December 12, 2000, FBI surveillance personnel observed HANSSEN driving four times past the Foxstone Park sign on Creek Crossing Road in Vienna, Virginia. As described above, the Foxstone Park sign is the signal site associated with the "ELLIS" dead drop site, which was used from early on in the KGB's "B" operation.

135. Also on the evening of Tuesday, December 12, 2000, FBI surveillance personnel observed HANSSEN walking into a particular store at a shopping center near Foxstone Park at the same time as a known SVR officer was in front of the store.

136. On Tuesday, December 26, 2000, FBI surveillance personnel observed HANSSEN three times at the Foxstone Park signal site:

137. During January 2001, FBI surveillance personnel observed HANSSEN drive past the Foxstone Park signal site, and either slowing or stopping at the site, on three occasions. At approximately 8:18 pm on Tuesday, January 9, 2001, HANSSEN drove past the Foxstone Park signal site, came to a complete stop in front of it for approximately 10 seconds, then drove away. Shortly before 6:00 pm on Tuesday, January 23, 2001, HANSSEN drove past the Foxstone Park signal site, came to a rolling stop near it, and then drove away. After 5:00 pm on Friday, January 26, 2001, HANSSEN drove past the Foxstone Park signal site, slowing down near it.

138. On the evening of Monday, February 5, 2001, FBI surveillance personnel observed HANSSEN driving past the Foxstone Park signal site three times between approximately 5:37 pm and approximately 7:44 pm.

139. On Monday, February 12, 2001, FBI surveillance personnel checking the "LEWIS" dead drop site found a package concealed at the site. FBI personnel removed the package and transported it to the FBI Laboratory, where it was opened, its contents were examined and photocopied, and it was restored to an apparently intact condition. The package was then replaced at the dead drop site. The package contained $50,000 in used $100 bills and a typed note reading: "Next 10/31/01 TOM alt. 20,27". These were wrapped in white paper, which was taped, and which in turn was wrapped in a taped-up black plastic trash bag inside a second black plastic trash bag.

VI. FACTS ESTABLISHING THAT "B" IS ROBERT PHILIP HANSSEN

There is overwhelming evidence that "B" is ROBERT PHILIP HANSSEN.

A. FORENSIC EVIDENCE

140. When "B" made dead drops to the KGB/SVR, he would place the contents of the drop in a plastic garbage bag, which he would wrap with tape. The plastic bag would then be placed inside a second garbage bag. The FBI has come into possession of the inner plastic bag used by "B" on one occasion to wrap the contents of a package to the KGB.

141. An FBI fingerprint examiner has conducted an examination of the plastic bag and ascertained that it contains two latent fingerprints of comparison value. The examiner determined that these two fingerprints are those of ROBERT PHILIP HANSSEN.

B. MATERIAL OBTAINED FROM HANSSEN'S FBI OFFICE AND VEHICLE

142. On February 5, 2001, pursuant to court authorization, the FBI searched HANSSEN's current personal office within Room 9930 at FBI Headquarters. HANSSEN's briefcase, located in the office, contained (1) HANSSEN's current valid United States tourist passport; (2) a personal address book; (3) several personal checkbooks; (4) multiple sets of financial statements; (5) one computer floppy disk; (6) one 8MB Versa Card Flash Memory Adapter, which is a memory storage card for a computer; (7) one cell phone. These items were photographed, duplicated, or otherwise recorded, but not removed or altered. Upon examination, the FBI determined that the memory storage card contained several letters associated with the "B" operation, which are further described elsewhere in this Affidavit. That these letters were found in HANSSEN's possession is clear and unequivocal evidence that HANSSEN is "B".

143. On January 30, 2001, pursuant to court authorization, the FBI searched HANSSEN's Ford Taurus automobile, and found the following:

These items were not removed, although small samples were taken, and they were photographed.

144. On February 12, 2001, pursuant to court authorization, the FBI again searched HANSSEN's Ford Taurus automobile. In addition to the items described in part (1) of the foregoing paragraph, the glove compartment contained a small plastic box containing thumbtacks of various colors, including yellow and white. It was further ascertained that at least one of the pieces of chalk was pink. These items were not removed, although small samples were taken, and they were photographed. During this search, HANSSEN's briefcase was observed in the vehicle, but it was not removed.

C. RECORDING OF TELEPHONE CONVERSATION

145. On August 18, 1986, KGB Officer Aleksander Fefelov spoke by telephone with "B". A portion of that telephone call, lasting approximately two minutes, was recorded. Two FBI analysts, who have worked closely and routinely with HANSSEN for at least five years, have listened to both the recording and an FBI-enhanced version of the recording in which background noise has been minimized. They have both concluded without reservation that the voice of "B" is that of HANSSEN.

D. DEAD DROP SITES

146. There is a particularly clear correlation between HANSSEN's personal residence in Northern Virginia and two dead drop sites used frequently in the "B" operation.

147. In 1985, when "B" volunteered to the KGB, HANSSEN lived on Whitecedar Court, in Vienna, Virginia. The first dead drop site selected by "B" was Nottoway Park, which was less than a five minute walk from Whitecedar Court. Between 1985 and 1989, the Nottoway Park site was used for dead drops so frequently - 17 times - that it was designated by the KGB as the "PARK/PRIME" dead drop site.

148. In November 1985, the Whitecedar Court house was sold and HANSSEN moved to New York to undertake his new assignment in the New York Field Office. He returned to FBI Headquarters in August 1987, and moved into a home at 9414 Talisman Drive, Vienna, Virginia, which he had bought in July 1987.

149. In August 1989, the KGB designated drop site "ELLIS," located near Foxstone Park in Vienna, Virginia. The frequent use of this site -- at least seven times -- suggests that "B" lived very close to the site or passed it routinely. A further indication of this is that "B" told the KGB in October 1989 that the KGB could use the "ELLIS" site at any time. In fact, the "ELLIS" site is an approximately one-mile walk from HANSSEN's Talisman Drive residence.

E. PALM III

150. HANSSEN owns a Palm III device which is a hand-held personal digital assistant. The FBI has determined that HANSSEN's Palm III contains a reference to "ELLIS" and the date February 18, and the time 8:00. The term "ELLIS" is the KGB/SVR codename for the dead drop site located in the area of Foxstone Park that was used seven times by either "B", the KGB/SVR, or both.

F. CORRELATION OF HANSSEN'S WORK ASSIGNMENTS TO "B"'s DISCLOSURES TO THE KGB/SVR

151. "B"'s first letter to the KGB was postmarked in Prince George's County, Maryland, on Tuesday, October 1, 1985. Although at that time HANSSEN had recently been re-assigned to New York City, FBI records show that on that particular day he was in Washington, D.C., on administrative matters. Prince George's County is located on the route between Washington, D.C., and New York City.

152. In May 1990, "B" told the KGB that, due to a promotion, he would be traveling more and his access to materials would be limited. In May 1990, HANSSEN was reassigned from the Soviet Analytical Unit in the Intelligence Division to the Inspection Division at FBI Headquarters. An Inspection Division assignment is a typical feature of an FBI supervisory agent's career path and requires frequent travel to FBI field offices for inspections. While serving in this assignment, HANSSEN traveled frequently from June 1990 through June 1991 to conduct inspections in various FBI offices.

153. On July 15, 1991, "B" indicated to the KGB that he had "returned" from a trip. The KGB responded on August 15, 1991 with a message welcoming him back and noting that "it's great for you to touch the green, green grass o£ home." HANSSEN returned on May 24, 1991 from a lengthy overseas inspection tour.

154. On December 16, 1991, "B" told the KGB that he had "an increase in salary and authority [which] moved him temporarily out of direct responsibility, but a new mission for my new group has not been fully defined" and that "I hope to adjust to that . . . . As General Patton said . . . 'let's get this over with so we can go kick the [ ] out of the [ ] Japanese." (He quoted the same reference to Japanese in the letter he wrote to the SVR on or before June 8, 2000.) At that time, HANSSEN was preparing to assume new duties as Chief of the new National Security Threat List Unit at FBI Headquarters, where he focused the Unit's counterintelligence efforts on economic espionage. This new assignment resulted in an increase in salary (from GS-14 to GS- 15) and authority (Unit Chief). Several FBI employees recall that HANSSEN frequently quoted General Patton, and one employee who worked closely with HANSSEN specifically remembers HANSSEN once using the above-mentioned Patton quote in a discussion with him.

155. In February 1988, "B" told the KGB that he could read the Viktor Sheymov file because a special project relating to Sheyrnov was about to begin. At that time, HANSSEN was reviewing the Sheyrnov file in preparation for his participation in upcoming Intelligence Community debriefings of Sheymov.

156. Throughout the "B" operation, "B" reported on Sheymov's defection. HANSSEN took particular interest in the Sheymov case and developed a personal friendship with Sheymov. Recently, in fact, HANSSEN told FBI co-workers that he was considering an offer of lucrative employment by Sheymov after retirement in April 2001.

157. On August 19, 1991, "B" passed detailed information to the KGB on FBI coverage of a particular suspected Soviet intelligence officer. On July 1, 1991, HANSSEN returned to the Intelligence Division at FBI Headquarters (after his tour of duty on the Inspection Staff) and became the Headquarters Supervisor responsible for FBI coverage of this suspected Soviet intelligence officer.

158. In his assignment to CI-3A, the FBI's Soviet Analytical Unit, HANSSEN had access to an extremely broad array of highly classified material. The FBI has determined that HANSSEN's access to classified material is consistent with "B"'s disclosure of classified material to the KGB/SVR.

159. During two extended periods when "B" was inactive, from November 1985 to June 1986, and August 1986 to August 1987, HANSSEN was assigned to the FBI's Field Office in New York City.

160. In July 1991, "B" told the KGB that he had at least five more years until retirement. HANSSEN was eligible for retirement from the FBI in 1996.

G. HANSSEN'S USE OF THE FBI AUTOMATED CASE SUPPORT SYSTEM

161. The Automated Case Support System (ACS) is the FBI's collected computerized databases of investigative files and indices. ACS came online in October 1995.

The main, and most extensive ACS database, is the Electronic Case File (ECF), which contains electronic communications and certain other documents related to ongoing FBI investigations, programs, and issues, and the indices to those documents. It is the equivalent of a closed FBI intranet. ACS users can access individual files by making full-text search requests for particular words or terms.

162. FBI personnel who are "approved users" of ACS, including HANSSEN, must log on with a user identification number and password unique to each user. Retrieval logs make it possible to conduct audits of individuals' use of ACS.

163. An audit of HANSSEN's use of ACS shows that he has been a consistent user of ECF in particular, and that he periodically conducted searches of the ECF database using a wide variety of very specific search terms. Although some of HANSSEN's ACS use appears to have been related to his official responsibilities, he made a substantial number of ACS searches apparently directly related to his own espionage activities. Through these searches, HANSSEN could retrieve certain FBI records that would indicate whether HANSSEN or his KGB/SVR associates, or their activities or operational locations, were known to or suspected by the FBI, and thus whether he was exposed to danger.

For example, on the following dates HANSSEN searched the ECF for the following terms, limiting some of the searches to a specified period of time as indicated:

H. "B"'S "OLD FRIEND"

164. In 1991, "B" proposed that the KGB consider recruiting a particular named individual who he described as an "old friend." HANSSEN had been friends with this individual since HANSSEN was a teenager.

VII. LOCATION OF EVIDENCE, FRUITS, INSTRUMENTALITIES,. AND PROCEEDS

165. Based on my training and experience, and that of other FBI personnel with whom I have consulted, and on my participation in this investigation, I know that:

166. Persons who have engaged in espionage activities on behalf of foreign intelligence services maintain records, notes, bank records, financial statements, calendars, journals, maps, instructions, classified documents, and other papers or documents relating to the transmittal of national defense and classified intelligence information to foreign governments and intelligence services. Such records, notes, bank records, financial statements, calendars, journals, maps, instructions, classified documents, and other papers or documents are maintained, albeit often secreted, on their persons, in and around their residences, at their places of employment, in home and office computers, in their automobiles, and in other remote locations such as safe deposit boxes and storage facilities.

167. Persons who have been engaged in espionage activities on behalf of foreign intelligence services often utilize espionage paraphernalia, including devices designed to conceal and transmit national defense and classified intelligence information. These paraphernalia and devices include materials used by espionage agents to communicate between each other and with a foreign government, to wit: coded pads, secret writing paper, chemicals used to develop coded and secret messages, microdots, and microfiche, together with instructions in the use of these materials; electronic recording and transmittal equipment; computers and computer disks; cameras and film; books, records, documents, and papers. The information that is frequently passed or recorded through such methods often includes: (1) national defense and classified intelligence information; (2) the identities of other foreign espionage agents and intelligence officers; (3) financial transactions, including payments to foreign espionage agents and hidden financial accounts; (4) records of previous illicit espionage transactions; and (5) the source and disposition of national defense and classified information.

168. Persons who have been engaged in espionage activities on behalf of foreign intelligence services routinely conceal in their residences large amounts of United States and foreign currency, financial instruments, precious metals and gems, jewelry, and other items of value and/or proceeds of illegal espionage transactions. They also conceal records relating to hidden foreign and domestic bank and financial records, including accounts in fictitious names.

169. Persons who have been engaged in espionage activities on behalf of foreign intelligence services often secrete national defense and classified documents and materials, as well as clandestine communications devices and instructions, contact instructions, codes, telephone numbers, maps, photographs, other papers and materials relating to communications procedures, and proceeds and records of illegal espionage transactions, in secure hidden locations and compartments within their residences, places of employment, safe deposit boxes, storage facilities, and/or motor vehicles, including hidden compartments within motor vehicles, for ready access and to conceal such items from law enforcement authorities.

170. Persons who have been engaged in espionage activities on behalf of foreign intelligence services are not unlike any other person in our society in that they maintain documents and records, often doing so for long periods of time regardless of whether their value to the person has diminished. These persons maintain documents and records that will identify and corroborate travel both in the United States and abroad made in connection with foreign intelligence activity, including personal meets with foreign intelligence officers. Such documents and records include passports, visas, calendars, journals, date books, telephone numbers, credit cards, hotel receipts, airline records, correspondence, carbon copies of money orders and cashier's checks evidencing large cash expenditures, and accounts and records in fictitious names.

171. Persons who have been engaged in espionage activities on behalf of foreign intelligence services often maintain identity documents, including those utilizing fictitious identities. United States foreign currency, instructions, maps, photographs. United States and foreign bank accounts' access numbers and instructions, and other papers and materials relating to emergency contact procedures and escape plans.

172. The above-described results of recent court authorized searches of HANSSEN's automobile and office demonstrate that HANSSEN has retained evidence of his espionage activity, and that such activity is ongoing.

173. Both the location of the dead drop site "ELLIS", and the location of the signal site associated with the "ELLIS" dead drop site — the Foxstone Park sign in the southern part of Foxstone Park -- are within an approximately one-mile driving and walking distance from HANSSEN's residence at 9414 Talisman Drive, Vienna, Virginia.

174. "B" had substantial communications with the KGB about using sophisticated computer techniques for communications, and he sent information to the KGB on encrypted computer diskettes. HANSSEN is known to be highly skilled in the use of computers and computer programming, and to maintain at least one computer with its own server in his residence at 9414 Talisman Drive, Vienna, Virginia. There is thus probable cause to believe that in continuing espionage activities HANSSEN is using one or more computers (in addition to his Palm III device) and related disks, diskettes, and other equipment now located in his residence at 9414 Talisman Drive, Vienna, Virginia.

VIII. SPECIAL NEEDS AND JUSTIFICATION TO SEIZE COMPUTERS AND RELATED HARDWARE AND ELECTRONIC STORAGE DEVICES FOUND AT HANSSEN'S RESIDENCE FOR OFF-SITE EXAMINATION

175. As noted above, HANSSEN has a high degree of computer technology expertise. In addition, there is probable cause to believe that HANSSEN is using computers as an instrumentality of his espionage activities. This is evidenced by the letters to and from the KGB/SVR found on the computer memory card in his briefcase, and by the reference "ELLIS" on his Palm III device, as well as HANSSEN's extensive accessing of the FBI's ACS system for information relevant to his espionage activities. HANSSEN has at least one computer and a server in his residence at 9414 Talisman Drive, Vienna, Virginia, and a portable laptop computer. Because of the likelihood that HANSSEN will have extraordinary amounts of information and files in his computers (including laptops) and any computer storage devices and that such information may be encrypted, it will be neither practical nor reasonable to require the searching agents to examine the defendant's computers onsite at his residence. Given HANSSEN's computer expertise and concern about detection, there is considerable risk that HANSSEN has set up self-destruct programs for his computers that could erase vital evidence and files if his system or systems were examined by anyone other than experts. Accordingly, the FBI intends to seize those components of HANSSEN' s computer hardware and related equipment as the FBI determines must be seized in order to be examined in an appropriate location by Computer Analysis Response Team (CART) personnel. Seizing and disabling the defendant's computer hardware will also help prevent HANSSEN or any co-conspirators from seeking to erase any data on HANSSEN's computer system (including his server) from any remote location and through any special destructive program.

176. In addition, it is highly probable that HANSSEN has access to and has used the computers (including laptops) of family members residing in the same residence. Accordingly, he may be using these computers of family members to store or transmit or conceal classified information or other evidence of the espionage activity set forth in this affidavit. It will therefore be necessary to seize and examine the computer hardware and files within of family members. Such computers and files therein will be speedily returned to those family members if examination discloses that they have in fact no evidence or documents connected to the espionage activity described in this Affidavit.

IX. REQUEST FOR AUTHORITY TO EXECUTE SEARCH WARRANTS DURING NIGHTTIME HOURS

Based on my experience and the experience of other FBI Special Agents known to me, I am aware that persons who have committed serious felonies, particularly those felonies with authorized punishments of death or incarceration for any term of years or life, will often attempt to destroy evidence, fruits, and instrumentalities of their crimes if alerted prematurely to law enforcement interest. I also know that foreign intelligence services, including the SVR, are able to communicate prearranged "danger" signals to their agents to alert them to destroy evidence, fruits and other instrumentalities of crime, as well as to execute emergency escape plans. I am also aware that these hostile foreign intelligence services, and in particular the SVR, actively seek to penetrate United States intelligence and law enforcement agencies by technical and human means to learn about FBI counterintelligence activities. As a result, law enforcement interest could be detected at any time and it may be necessary to execute a search warrant during night time hours to preserve evidence, fruits and instrumentalities of espionage from destruction.

In addition, it is noted that as a Special Agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, HANSSEN is authorized to carry a service weapon at all times, and he is known to have additional weapons in his residence, and may in his vehicles, that could pose an immediate danger and threat to any searching or arresting agents unless seized and secured as quickly as possible.

If the FBI is unsuccessful in apprehending HANSSEN immediately, he could return home during evening hours to destroy incriminating evidence, obtain a weapon and other items to assist his flight or evasion. In an undated letter to the KGB in November 1985, HANSSEN wrote: "Eventually I would appreciate an escape plan." HANSSEN currently carries his valid tourist passport in his briefcase. As noted above, the SVR has instructed HANSSEN to use a yellow tack in case of a "threatening situation", which could trigger an SVR-assisted escape, and he has recently possessed yellow tacks. It is highly likely that HANSSEN would have such an escape plan in place by 2001, and that authority to search at any time of the day or night would be essential to foil any such escape plan, especially if HANSSEN received warning from the SVR.

Finally, as noted above, much of the operational activity of the "B" operation occurred at night. Recently, HANSSEN was observed checking a known KGB/SVR signal site on several nighttime occasions in December 2000 and January and February. Accordingly, there is probable cause to believe that HANSSEN would go to the signal site or related dead drop site (both designated under the code name "ELLIS") at any time, and especially at night to avoid detection. Because an arrest of HANSSEN could well occur in the nighttime hours, and the searches should be conducted immediately upon his arrest, authority is requested to execute search warrants during nighttime hours.

X. CONCLUSION AS TO PROBABLE CAUSE TO SEARCH

177. Based on the above facts and circumstances, I believe there is probable cause that evidence, fruits, instrumentalities, and proceeds of espionage activity by ROBERT PHILIP HANSSEN, in violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 794 (a) (Transmitting National Defense Information) and Section 794 (c) (Conspiracy to Commit Espionage), are located in:

XI. WARRANTS REQUESTED

Based on all the foregoing, I respectfully request a warrant for the arrest of ROBERT PHILIP HANSSEN, and search warrants for the locations described in the immediately foregoing Section of this Affidavit.

XII. ATTESTATION

The above facts are true and correct to the best of my knowledge and belief.

Sworn and Subscribed to before me this 16th day of February, 2001.

[signed:] THOMAS RAWLES JONES, JR.
UNITED STATES MAGISTRATE JUDGE


ATTACHMENT A

1) Espionage paraphernalia, including devices designed to conceal and transmit national defense and classified intelligence information and material, and implements used by espionage agents to communicate with their handlers and with a foreign government, to wit: white tape, mailing tape, colored chalk (all used for signaling purposes), coded pads, secret writing paper, microdots, any letters, notes or other written communications (including contact instructions) between defendant ROBERT PHILIP HANSSEN and any agents of the SVR or other intelligence service of the Russian Federation; any computers, (including laptops), computer disks, cameras, film, codes, telephone numbers, maps, photographs and other materials relating to communication procedures, correspondence;

2) Records, notes, calendars, journals, maps, instructions, and classified documents and other papers and documents relating to the transmittal of national defense and classified intelligence information (including the identities of foreign espionage agents and intelligence officers and other foreign assets or sources providing information to the United States Intelligence Community, such as the FBI and CIA; United States Government ledger notebooks in which the defendant ROBERT PHILIP HANSSEN has notes pertaining to FBI foreign counterintelligence investigations; records of previous illicit espionage transactions, national defense and classified intelligence information, including copies of documents copied or downloaded by ROBERT PHILIP HANSSEN from the FBI's Automated Case Support System (ACS), which is the FBI's computerized databases of investigative indices and files; FBI investigative serials; records receipts, .papers or documents reflecting financial accounts, where ROBERT PHILIP HANSSEN received payments from the KGB, SVR, or other agents of the Soviet Union or successor Russian Federation, records or documents reflecting the source and disposition of national defense and classified intelligence and counterintelligence information;

3) Large amounts of United States and foreign currency, financial instruments, precious metals, jewelry, and other items of value, which are the proceeds of or assets derived from illegal espionage transactions; any financial records of foreign and domestic bank accounts, including canceled checks, monthly statements, deposit slips, withdrawal slips, wire transfer requests and confirmations, account numbers, addresses, credit cards and credit card statements, financial and investment account records (including dividend records, stock transaction records), all reflecting illicit proceeds or wealth from multiple years of engaging in espionage for pay from the Soviet Union and successor Russian Federation and their intelligence services; records of such financial accounts and records in the possession or control of defendant ROBERT PHILIP HANSSEN but in fictitious or alias names;

4) Passports, visas, calendars, date books, address books, credit card and hotel receipts, airline records, reflecting travel in furtherance of espionage activities, and any documents evidencing large cash expenditures derived from espionage activities;

5) Identity documents, including but not limited to passports, licenses, visas (including those in fictitious or alias identities), U.S. and foreign currency, instructions, maps, photographs, U.S. and foreign bank account access numbers and instructions and other papers and materials relating to emergency contact procedures and escape routes;

6) Safety deposit box records, including signature cards, bills, and payment records, safety deposit box keys, whether in the name of the defendant or a family member; any records pertaining to any commercial storage sites where the defendant may be storing other classified intelligence and counter-intelligence documents or other records of his espionage activities;

7) Federal, state and local tax returns, work sheets, W-2 forms, 1099 forms, and any related schedules;

8) Records concerning real property purchases, sales, transfers, both within the United States and any foreign countries, including deeds, deeds of trust, land contracts, settlement statements, and mortgage documents, such records reflecting disposition of proceeds from and assets acquired from money paid to the defendant for his espionage on behalf of the Soviet Union, successor Russian Federation, and their intelligence services;

9) Telephone bills and records, including calling cards and pager records;

10) Photographs, including photographs of co-conspirators; correspondence (including envelopes) to and from ROBERT PHILIP HANSSEN and handlers, contacts and intelligence agents of the Soviet Union and successor Russian Federation;

11) Copies of applications, affidavits, search warrants, and returns filed with the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC), concerning current FBI foreign counterintelligence investigations and notes, reports and records pertaining to such investigations, including FBI requests for FISC authority;

12) Computer hardware, software, and storage media, known to be used by the defendant or to which he had access, including, but not limited to: any personal computer, laptop computer, modem, and server, which have been and are being used to commit the offenses of espionage and conspiracy to commit espionage; records, information and files contained within such computer hardware containing evidence and fruits of defendant's espionage activity between October 1, 1985, and the present, including classified documents, in whatever form and by whatever means they have been created or stored, including but not limited to any electrical, electronic, or magnetic form of storage device; floppy diskettes, hard disks, zip disks, CD-ROMs, optical discs, backup tapes, printer buffers, smart cards, memory calculators, pagers, personal digital assistants such as Palm III devices, removable hard drives, memory cards, zip drives, and any photographic forms of such records including microfilm, digital prints, slides, negatives, microfiche, photocopies, and videotapes, computer terminals and printers used by the defendant in said espionage activity.

ATTACHMENT B

9414 Talisman Drive, Vienna, Virginia, is the current residence of defendant ROBERT PHILIP HANSSEN, and his family. This residence is a single family detached house, the closet street intersecting 9414 Talisman Drive is McKinley Street. Talisman Drive ends in a cul de sac. It is further described as a wood multi-story building painted brown. This residence also includes an attached garage. 9414 Talisman Drive includes any appurtenances within the curtilege of this property, and any grounds, yard or woods constituting any part of the land upon which this residence is located.

ATTACHMENT C

One 1997 Ford Taurus four-door, silver in color, VIN #IFALP52U9VG211742, Virginia license tags ZCW9538, which is owned by, registered to, and used by ROBERT PHILIP HANSSEN. It is anticipated that this vehicle will be located in the Eastern District of Virginia in the vicinity of 9414 Talisman Drive in Vienna, Virginia, or elsewhere in the Eastern District of Virginia.

ATTACHMENT D

One 1993 Volkswagen van, Vin #WV2KC0706PH080424, Virginia license tags ZCW9537, owned and used by ROBERT PHILIP HANSSEN, and also used by his wife. It is anticipated that this vehicle will be located in the Eastern District of Virginia in the vicinity of 9414 Talisman Drive, Vienna, Virginia.

ATTACHMENT E

One 1992 Isuzu Trooper, VIN #JACDH58W7N7903937, Virginia license tags YRP3849. This vehicle is owned by, and possibly operated by ROBERT PHILIP HANSSEN. It is anticipated that this vehicle will be located in the Eastern District of Virginia in the vicinity of 9414 Talisman Drive, Vienna, Virginia.


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