Author: FAS

Why NATO Should Eliminate Its Tactical Nukes, Despite Russian Belligerence

In a new op-ed published in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Director of the Nuclear Information Project, Hans Kristensen and Adam Mount, Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, write that with the upcoming NATO summit in Wales, it is time to revisit the question of what to do with U.S. tactical nukes in Europe.

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FAS Roundup: September 2, 2014

Worldwide Deployment of Nuclear Weapons Hans Kristensen, Director of the Nuclear Information Project, and Robert Norris, Senior Fellow for Nuclear Policy, estimate that there are approximately 16,300 nuclear weapons located at  98 sites in 14 countries. Roughly 10,000 of these weapons are in military arsenals; the remaining weapons are retired and awaiting dismantlement. Approximately 4,000 are operationally available, and 1,800 are on high alert and ready for use on short notice. In the latest Nuclear Notebook published in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Kristensen and Norris examine the storage sites of deployed weapons in the nine nuclear countries. Read the article here. 

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Naval Reactors and HEU

FAS President Charles D. Ferguson gave a presentation on August 5th at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on the use of highly enriched uranium (a weapons-usable fissile material) in naval…

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House Intel Committee Needs Oversight of Its Own

In a new op-ed published on MSNBC.com, Steven Aftergood, Director of the Government Secrecy Project, and Representative Rush Holt, Former Chair of the House Intelligence Committee and Congressman from New Jersey's 12th District, examine how the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence (HPSCI) has lost sight of the founding principles of the committee in the wake of the passing of the annual intelligence authorization bill with a vote of 345-59.

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Nuclear Weapons Modernization: A Threat to the NPT?

In an article published in Arms Control Today, Hans Kristensen, Director of the Nuclear Information Project, examines the modernization programs underway in the nine nuclear countries, and finds that none of the countries appear to be planning to eliminate its nuclear weapons program; instead they are committing billions of dollars to modernize their nuclear forces.

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Thinking Outside Fukushima

Nearly two and a half years after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station—the Tokyo Electric Power Company (Tepco) finally admitted that it needed outside help to control the numerous problems at its stricken plant.

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Implications of the Recent Deal With Iran on Getting Controls on Civilian Nuclear Fuel Cycles

FAS President Dr. Charles Ferguson takes a look at one of the largest challenges to nonproliferation: how states can walk up to the line of crossing into nuclear weapons capabilit by developing uranium enrichment plants or reprocessing plants. Could the new deal with Iran have implications for Japan and other non-nuclear weapon states like South Korea that aspire to acquire enrichment or reprocessing capabilities? The answer is yes.

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Lessons Unlearned

Syria is the first WMD-armed country to descend into civil war. How the United States and the world handles Syria will unmistakably affect future dealings in similar situations in which hostile countries possess WMDs. To get the WMD assessment in Syria right, U.S. and world leaders will have to break free of the past habits of obfuscation, unsound scientific forensics, and withholding of conflicting data.

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