Skip to navigation Skip to content
ReallyReady America | ReallyReady Business | ReallyReady Disabilities
Homegeneral navigation

CLICK HERE to see local information.

Click Here for local information or use the menu below.

 

Descriptions of screenshots in analysis:

Generic Advice

"There are other circumstances when staying put and creating a barrier between yourself and potentially contaminated air outside, a process known as "sealing the room," is a matter of survival. Use available information to assess the situation. If you see large amounts of debris in the air, or if local authorities say the air is badly contaminated, you may want to take this kind of action." -Ready.gov: Deciding to Stay or Go

 

Unnecessarily Lengthy Descriptions
"Nose and Mouth Protection

Face masks or dense-weave cotton material, that snugly covers your nose and mouth and is specifically fit for each member of the family. Do whatever you can to make the best fit possible for children.

Be prepared to improvise with what you have on hand to protect your nose, mouth, eyes and cuts in your skin. Anything that fits snugly over your nose and mouth, including any dense-weave cotton material, can help filter contaminants in an emergency. It is very important that most of the air you breathe comes through the mask or cloth, not around it.

Do whatever you can to make the best fit possible for children. There are also a variety of face masks readily available in hardware stores that are rated based on how small a particle they can filter in an industrial setting.

Given the different types of emergencies that could occur, there is not one solution for creating a barrier between yourself and any contamination in the air. For instance, simple cloth face masks can filter some of the airborne "junk" or germs you might breathe into your body, but will probably not protect you from chemical gases. Still, something over your nose and mouth in an emergency is better than nothing. Limiting how much "junk" gets into your body may impact whether or not you get sick or develop disease." -Ready.gov: Clean Air

 

Repetitive Details

The following information is repeated on Ready.gov: Emergency Planning for Employees and Ready.gov: Involve Co-Workers:

  • Use newsletters, intranets, staff meetings and other internal communications tools to communicate emergency plans and procedures.
  • Consider setting up a telephone call tree, password-protected page on the company website, email alert or call-in voice recording to communicate with employees in an emergency.
  • Designate an out-of-town phone number where employees can leave an "I'm Okay" message in a catastrophic disaster. Remember to minimize your calls and keep them short so others can get through.

 

Disabled and Special Needs

The images from Ready.gov: Disabled and Special Needs and Ready.gov: Pet Items compared side by side show that there there the amount of information for each is equivalent.