News

Proposer Information Package

Airborne Video Surveillance

 
 
 
 

Table of Contents


 




A. ACQUISITION STRATEGY AND IMPORTANT DATES

I. INTRODUCTION II. TECHNICAL OVERVIEW: MAJOR AVS TECHNOLOGY WORK PACKAGES
  Precision Video Registration (PVR)

Multiple Target Surveillance (MTS)

Activity Monitoring (AM)
 

AVS Technology Subsystem Research and Development (TSRD) Summary
  High Level AVS TSRD Goals

AVS TSRD Work Package Scope

Major Collaboration Required

Awards
 

AVS TSRD Technology Area Summaries
  Work Package 1: Precision Video Registration (PVR)

Work Package 2: Multiple Target Surveillance (MTS)

Work Package 3: Activity Monitoring (AM)

Work Package 4: Other Advanced Video Surveillance Techniques

AVS TSRD Budget Estimates and Guidance

AVS TSRD High-Level System Issues and Requirements

AVS TSRD Incremental Annual Capability and Performance Goals
 

AVS System Integrator (AVS SI) Program Roles and Responsibilities
  AVS CONOPS and High-Level Design Document (CONOPS/HLDD)

CAGS System and Design Document
 

Government Furnished Airborne Testbed
  Testbed Flight Operations Requirements

Airborne Testbed Characteristics
 

AVS Common Development Environment
  Hardware Environment

Software Environment:

III. AVS TSRD DELIVERABLES
  IV. PROGRAM SCHEDULE V. EVALUATION CRITERIA
  VI. PROPOSAL PREPARATION AND DELIVERY

VOLUME I: Technical Proposal

VOLUME II: Cost Proposal

A. Cover Page:

B. Budget Summary:

C. Budget Details: Include any other relevant details that support section A above.

D. Organizational Conflict of Interest

VII. TECHNICAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION

VIII. OTHER IMPORTANT ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION

APPENDIX A - AVS ACRONYMS
 
 



PROPOSER INFORMATION PACKAGE (PIP)

Airborne Video Surveillance
(AVS)
Broad Agency Announcement
(BAA 97-42)
 

Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency
(DARPA)


 




The information provided in this Proposer Information Package (PIP), in addition to that provided in the Commerce Business Daily (CBD) Announcement, BAA 97-42, constitutes a Broad Agency Announcement as contemplated in FAR 6.102 (d)(2)(i).
 
 

Technical POC: Thomas Strat, DARPA/ISO, [email protected], FAX: (703) 696-2203 Contractual POC: Ms. Algeria Tate, DARPA/CMO
 
 

A. ACQUISITION STRATEGY AND IMPORTANT DATES
 
 

AVS Program Acquisition Strategy
 
 

This solicitation will define and procure three to four AVS Technology Subsystem Research and Development (TSRD) Work Packages in the following categories:

Once providers for these work packages are selected, a totally distinct and separate procurement will be carried out to select an AVS Systems Integrator (SI) to assemble the selected TSRD efforts into an integrated AVS system that can be annually demonstrated to, and evaluated by, AVS systems users.
 
 

These annual demonstrations and mission evaluations will be jointly defined, designed, tested, integrated by the AVS TSRD developers and the AVS SI. The demonstrations and mission evaluations will use an AVS Airborne Testbed provided by the US Army CECOM Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD).
 
 

High level data about the program roles and responsibilities of an AVS SI is provided in this document for reference only. It is designed to help TSRD offerors understand how to structure their responses to this solicitation. Actual details and requirements for AVS SI offerors will be published under another procurement. Additionally, high level descriptions are provided of the AVS airborne testbed to inform the TSRD offerors of available capabilities.
 
 

This acquisition strategy has been adopted to maintain an aggressive technology focus for the AVS program (the best TSRDs will be identified initially), while providing a potential AVS SI with a much more detailed description of the TSRDs that will be integrated into AVS systems. To this end, TSRDs offerors have been required to submit a non-proprietary section of their proposal (Proposal section R described in section VI of this document) that can be distributed to all potential AVS SI offerors at the open of the AVS SI solicitation, and TSRDs selected for potential program awards will be directed to brief their proposed technical approaches and plans at an industry briefing for the AVS SI procurement (described in section III ofthis document). It is also anticipated that potential TSRDs will have ongoing discussions with potential AVS SI offerors that will identify and resolve any problematic intellectual property issues that may impede the achievement of AVS program goals.
 
 

Summary of Important Dates
 
 

28 August 1997 Industry Briefing for AVS Technology Subsystem Research and Development (TSRD) Efforts

  7 October 1997 AVS TSRD Proposal Due Date, BAA 97-42 Closes
 

7 November 1997 (Estimated) Selected AVS TSRDs Notified of Potential

Selection for AVS Program. Selectees are requested to prepare

briefings on their technical approaches to present at an Industry

Briefing for an AVS SI Effort
 

14 November 1997 (Estimated) Release of solicitation for an AVS Systems

Integration (SI) Effort
 

21 November 1997 (Estimated) Industry Briefing for AVS SI Effort. Selected

TSRDs will Present Their Technical Approaches
 

23 December 1997 (Estimated) Due date for AVS SI proposals. AVS SI

solicitation closes.
 

1 March 1998 Contract Awards for AVS TSRDs and SI. All participants

start preparations for prgroam kickoff meeting
 

2 April 1998 AVS Program Kickoff Meeting
 
 
 
 

I. INTRODUCTION
 
 

Background

In the very near future, battlefield commanders will be able to rapidly task Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and obtain large volumes of surveillance imagery. Some UAV surveillance systems in early deployment have the capability to collect and provide video imagery directly to ground exploitation systems and command posts. Motion video data is proving to be quite powerful in these deployments for a number of reasons. Some examples are:
 
 

Because of these and other advantages, and because endurance UAVs are being designed to dwell over battle areas for long periods, video imagery from airborne platforms will be a critical component of existing and future battlefield surveillance systems.
 
 

In early deployed prototype systems, video exploitation is completely manual, using two or more personnel. A video payload operator must control the sensor and inspect the output stream for quality. An imagery analyst then inspects the video stream and exploits/disseminates either still frames or voice-annotated video "clips". "Two people chained to a soda-straw view of the world" is an analogy used in discussing this mode of control and exploitation.
 
 

DARPA is soliciting proposals for the technology research and development portion of an Airborne Video Surveillance (AVS) program to address some of these shortcomings and to explore and evaluate ways of converting AVS systems from remotely controlled surveillance sources returning video streams to semi-autonomous active surveillance systems performing designated tasks.
 
 

Video (defined for AVS as any EO or IR sensor producing image frames at greater than 1 Hz) is currently the only widely available tactical sensor capable of providing both the high resolution and rapid revisit rates required for comprehensive battlespace awareness. Video sensors possess a number of advantages for tactical exploitation as video data is human understandable, provides continuous coverage, can track non scattering targets, provides motion information, and is currently produced in large volumes (making it very available for AVS system development). Bounding these advantages are a number of limitations including the narrow field-of-view (FOV) of existing video sensors, the impacts of weather on video collection quality and availability, the tedious nature of manual video exploitation, the cumbersome data volumes, and the content perishable nature of the video information content.
 
 

The operational limitations of current video surveillance systems provide a number of technology challenges that AVS is expected to address. The ability to deliver weapons to a target location is dependent upon accurate geolocation, but the 30-100 meter pointing accuracy of today’s systems falls far short of the 10 meter or less requirement of modern weapons systems. Mapping of video imagery to other data sources (such as digital terrain maps) is still a difficult and largely unautomated field process. Today’s UAVs continue to be tasked like satellites and provide no ability to compensate for their narrow FOVs by tracking multiple moving targets. This in turn translates into sensor underutilization wherein image analysts (IA) are only able to watch a single object or area at a time. Finally, the volume of video data being collected swamps both the user and the communication links. Combined with the lack of an exploitation infrastructure to support video processing, this results in missions where the time required for an operator to exploit video data is larger than the video collection time cycle. With the future envisioned to bring 100s of UAVs to the battlespace exploiting 1,000s of targets in 10,000s of square kilometers, the exploitation burden will only increase.
 
 

Specifically, DARPA seeks proposals to develop and demonstrate real-time Precision Video Registration (PVR), Multiple Target Surveillance (MTS) , and automated Activity Monitoring (AM) of sites (points, areas, lines of communications) using electro-optical (EO) and infrared (IR) imagery similar to that available from current (e.g., Predator, Hunter) and future (e.g., Global Hawk, Dark Star, Outrider) unmanned aerial vehicle systems. When combined with existing EO and IR target recognition algorithms, AVS will provide the Warfighter with a comprehensive video battlespace awareness capability.
 
 
 
 

II. TECHNICAL OVERVIEW: MAJOR AVS TECHNOLOGY WORK PACKAGES
 
 

AVS Program Goals
 
 

The goal of the AVS program is to research, develop, and evaluate PVR, MTS and AM technology subsytems and combine them to form a real-time airborne video surveillance system. A solicitation for the systems integration effort will be issued at a later date.
 
 

This system must be able to operate in either single mode (one technology subsystem only) or multiple mode (e.g., MTS and AM using PVR functions to locate moving vehicles and activities).
 
 

Real operational scenarios will dictate that these technologies, when combined with automated sensor control and intuitive operator displays, will be employed in innovative and unpredictable combinations. Therefore, it is important that all elements of the AVS technology program work together in a modular, "toolkit" framework.
 
 

Since these systems must be demonstrated and evaluated on an airborne platform, extensive infrastructure (in the form of airborne testbed, airborne testbed systems, and ground applications) will be provided as part of the program. The technology developers must work closely with these other program participants.
 
 

The challenges, potential candidate techniques, evaluation metrics, and specific performance goals for each of these technologies are described below. It is expected that offerors to each of these areas will be able to identify their current existing capabilities and how they will achieve the desired AVS performance goals.
 
 

Precision Video Registration (PVR)
 
 

The challenges in PVR are in developing algorithms that are extremely accurate and robust with respect to large variations in viewing geometry, variable atmospheric conditions, and seasonal variations. Candidate approaches are envisioned to include registering video frames to orthophotos and any other reference imagery, recovering depth from sensor motions when reference imagery is inadequate, and employing multiple look registration techniques for missions where reference imagery is unavailable. Metrics for evaluating registration performance should include root-mean-square (RMS) error of absolute geolocation of targets , and the percentage of video frames correctly registered. Robustness and accuracy are the primary goal for the PVR subsystem, but the PVR offeror must design for and maintain real time performance on a processor system to be supplied by the AVS Systems Integrator, while characterizing the behavior of other metrics with respect to processing power (MIPS/FLOPS) required for the the real-time process.
 
 

The goals for PVR are to perform registration of imagery (including imagery of moving targets) at 1 Hz with two classes of performance:

 

Multiple Target Surveillance (MTS)
 
 

The challenge of MTS is to provide the operator with a single display representing a virtual field of view to simultaneously monitor and track a number of targets in the larger field of regard possible by gimbaling the sensor. Specific requirements are to predict the motion of targets from a small number of frames, reacquire targets after sensor slewing, generate virtual video streams for each tracked target and a composite field of regard image for video frames, and to track humans and vehicles when they are moving or temporarily stationary. Candidate approaches are envisioned to include signature correlation-based target tracking, optimized sensor control algorithms, and Kalman filtering for 3D tracking, through maneuvering, and temporary occlusion. Metrics for evaluating performance should include determining the number of targets within an extended field of regard that can be simultaneously tracked, target status and characteristics (e.g., velocity, contrast, size), and a mean time between track drop interval indicating the duration that N multiple targets can be simultaneously tracked.
 
 

The goals for MTS are to:

Activity Monitoring (AM)

The challenges for AM are in developing robust activity monitoring systems for airborne video capable of dealing with sensor motion and large variations in viewing geometry, supporting multiple activity models (human, vehicle, site), screening out scene motion noise (e.g., wind through trees), monitoring multiple modes (points, Lines of Communication (LOC), areas), and addressing variable scene content, atmospheric conditions, and imagery quality. Candidate approaches are envisioned to include techniques of image stabilization, host motion cancellation, activity detection, modeling, classification, and false alarm rejection based on activity and scene models. Metrics for evaluating performance should include probabilities of detection P(d) and false alarm P(fa) for each monitoring task, and scene content and image quality metrics.
 
 

The goals for active monitoring are to:


 
 

AVS Technology Subsystem Research and Development (TSRD) Summary
 
 

In the description of the TSRD work packages below, the following will be outlined:

High Level AVS TSRD Goals
 
 

Since AVS technology is new and emerging, the goal of the program is to develop and mature AVS technology while exploring and evaluating its use in realistic surveillance scenarios. A successful AVS program, at closure, will have explored numerous Technology Subsystem Research and Development (TSRD) approaches and matured the most promising of them into demonstrable prototype systems that have clear benefit to surveillance systems users. This clear benefit will be established by mission-level AVS system evaluations. Simultaneously, the performance envelope of TSRD subsystems will have been characterized with respect to variability in real world conditions.
 
 

The TSRD work packages focus on the research, development, test, documentation and characterization of subsystems which will form the key functionality of the AVS system. It is important that the product of the TSRD enable the creation of an overall AVS environment which supports user's needs to easily configure and link the technologies to address real world operational problems.
 
 

The TSRDs must simultaneously focus on: a) significantly extending the state-of-the-art in the particular area of interest; b) developing technology that has significant mission payoff; c) developing robust subsystems and delivering them for integration and demonstration; and d) establishing performance bounds (with respect to variable mission conditions) on the developed subsystems.
 
 
 
 

AVS TSRD Work Package Scope

Major Collaboration Required

TSRDs will collaborate extensively with the AVS SI to develop CONOPS, CAGS, and to conduct the scheduled integrations, demonstrations and field experiments. The extent and general requirements for the collaboration are outlined in the TSRD Work Package Scope section above.
 
 

Awards

It is anticipated that, at minimum, three TSRD awards may be made, one in each of the following categories:

Awards may be made in the following unspecified technology category if sufficient technical and mission benefits are evident and program funds are available. AVS TSRD Technology Area Summaries

The following four sections outline at a high level the technology categories of interest to the AVS effort. More detailed descriptions of these areas will be provided at the AVS Informational Briefing to Industry and will be posted on the AVS web pages.
 
 
 
 

Work Package 1: Precision Video Registration (PVR)

The PVR TSRD should develop subsystems that allow the fast registration of visible and infrared video imagery to accurately geo-referenced imagery or maps in order to allow the precision (in the range of 2-10 meter error) geo-location of targets in the video imagery. PVR should:
 
 

Current Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) systems rely on precision Global Positioning System/Inertial Navigation System (GPS/INS) systems, accurate sensor pointing information, and map information to deliver approximately 30 meter accuracy, at best.
 
 

Some of the approaches and technology used in current prototype systems that are capable of achieving much higher accuracy are:

Work Package 2: Multiple Target Surveillance (MTS)

MTS will develop technology to allow airborne gimbal-mounted video sensors in visible and infrared bands to simultaneously track multiple targets in a UAV system’s field of regard. A representative, but not exhaustive list of MTS functions follows:

Work Package 3: Activity Monitoring (AM)

AM will develop technology to allow airborne gimbal-mounted video sensors in visible and infrared bands to continuously monitor delineated areas within the UAV’s field of regard to detect specific activities and alert the AVS operator about them. A representative, but not exhaustive list of AM functions follows:

Work Package 4: Other Advanced Video Surveillance Techniques

DARPA is interested in any proposed TSRD that will improve video surveillance technology and surveillance mission efficiency. Offerors are encouraged to explicitly explain and enumerate the benefits of, and goals for such proposed techniques and submit proposals conforming to general TSRD rquirements and technical challenges listed above.
 
 

AVS TSRD Budget Estimates and Guidance

The following table contains "rough order of magnitude" (ROM) estimates of the budget that is anticipated to be available for all of the TSRD work packages, as determined in preliminary program planning efforts. The division of funding over these work packages will depend in part on how many individual TSRD awards are made (3 or 4 are anticipated). The funds will not necessarily be divided equally across the TSRD work packages awarded; offerors should bid costs consistent with their proposed level of effort.
 
 

 
Estimated Budget ($M)
Work Package
FY 98
FY 99
FY 00
FY 01
FY 02
Total AVS Funding Available for All TSRD Work Packages (1-4)
$0.9M
$3.5M
$3.7M
$2.1M
$0.6M
AVS TSRD High-Level System Issues and Requirements AVS TSRD Incremental Annual Capability and Performance Goals Each TSRD should propose to develop, demonstrate and evaluate increasingly capable subsystems, at the annual fall demonstrations, throughout the duration of the program. Deliveries of systems will be made 60 days prior to the annual fall demonstrations. Suggested incremental technology goals, based on preliminary program planning efforts, are listed below. Offerors are encouraged to propose aggressively planned annual TSRD capability and performance goals consistent with their research and development plans.  

1998:

(PVR): Laboratory demonstration of accurate georegistration of individual video frames to controlled, accurately georeferenced imagery of the collection site.
 
 

(MTS, AM): Laboratory demonstrations of base technology on collected imagery.
 
 

1999:

(PVR): Laboratory demonstrations of orthomosaicing of multiple video frames. Airborne demonstrations of orthomosaicing of Class 1 data, with 80% of the video frames registered to within 2 meter RMS error.

(MTS): Laboratory demonstrations of tracking and re-acquisition of targets from collected imagery.
 
 

(AM): Laboratory and airborne demontrations of of point monitoring.
 
 

(All TSRD): Demonstrations and evaluations of analyst HCIs for the TSRD systems.
 
 

2000:

(PVR): Airborne demonstrations of multiple-frame orthomosaics, with 90% of Class 1 and 75% of Class 2 data registered to better than 2 meter RMS error.
 
 

(MTS): Laboratory and airborne demonstrations of tracking of three distinct targets.
 
 

(AM): Laboratory and airborne demonstrations of point , area and LOC monitoring applications.
 
 

(All TSRD): Demonstrations and evaluations of analyst HCIs for the TSRD systems.
 
 

2001 - 2002

Airborne demonstrations will be conducted in conjunction with field exercises.
 
 

(PVR): Airborne demonstration of multiple-frame orthomosaics to full specifications for both Class 1 and Class 2 imagery .
 
 

(MTS): Laboratory and airborne demonstration of tracking of twelve targets.
 
 

(AM) Airnborne demonstrations of point, LOC and area monitoring in user missions.
 
 

(All TSRD): Demonstrations and evaluations of analyst HCIs for the TSRD systems.
 
 

2002:

Airborne demonstration in conjunction with field exercises of tracking twelve live targets. Demonstrations and evaluations of analyst HCIs for the systems are also required at this time.
 
 
 
 

AVS System Integrator (AVS SI) Program Roles and Responsibilities
 
 

The following section presents a brief overview of the high-level program roles and responsibilities for the AVS SI effort. These descriptions are provided for informational purposes only, in order to guide potential TSRD offerors in making innovative proposals.
 
 

The primary role of the AVS SI will be to take lead responsibility (with TSRD support) in the planning, coordination and carrying out of the scheduled integration of TSRDs into annual AVS demonstration and mission evaluations.

AVS CONOPS and High-Level Design Document (CONOPS/HLDD)
 
 

The AVS SI will develop templates for, build and maintain this document, in collaboration with the TSRDs and a government CONOPS working group. The CONOPS group will advise on, and review, AVS plans. The TSRDs will contribute sections for each major subsystem delivered for integration.
 
 

CAGS System and Design Document
 
 

The AVS SI will provide to the TSRDs a standard architecture and API to allow them to efficiently develop TSRD segments and integrate them onto the AVS testbed. A CAGS Architecture and Detailed System Design document will be provided to the TSRDs by the AVS SI. CAGS will cover the following functions:

Government Furnished Airborne Testbed
 
 

DARPA has arranged with the US Army CECOM Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD), Fort Belvoir, VA to provide the airborne testbed and all integration and operation. A description of this testbed will be presented at the AVS Industry Briefing. A brief description is provided here to guide TSRD designs and planning.
 
 

The testbed will be a manned airborne video testbed system, including EO/IR sensors, gimbal systems, GPS/INS systems and communications links. An air/ground operations site (Ft. AP Hill, VA) will be provided to support AVS development, integration, test and demonstrations. The operation and ground-truthing of vehicle and other activities required to develop the AVS system will be provided. In early FY 98, the AVS testbed, sensors, and low level core software will be available to support data collection efforts. Data collections will be performed as required to support long-lead TSRD efforts. NVESD will support all AVS design and coordination meetings to insure that air testbed and ground operations are consistent with AVS program schedule, plans and requirements.
 
 

The AVS SI will specify and supply what accelerated processing is required to support Multiple Target Surveillance and other AVS TSRD functions that require real time video processing on the airborne testbed.
 
 
 
 

Testbed Flight Operations Requirements

The following table outlines the number of testbed flight days DARPA estimates that the testbedwill be available to the AVS Team for either airborne mission flights or ground-based system installation and verification.
 
 

FY 98 
FY 99
FY 00
FY 01
FY 02
Estimated Testbed Access Days
20
50
40
40
40
In FY98, the 20 days allotted are intended for installation and testing of the AVS sensor, including core software, and performing data collection to support AVS TSRDs. In FY99 through FY02, several mission days will be available each year for standalone field operations/test by each TSRD category. These days are intended to support technology experiments and data collections specific to each TSRD area. The AVS TSRDs will specify these missions in cooperation with NVESD and the AVS SI.
 
 

The remaining mission days in FY99 through FY02 will be scheduled by the SI, and will be used for TSRD integration and annual demonstrations and mission evaluations.
 
 

In systems integration and demonstration operations, data will be collected to support TSRD requirements.
 
 
 
 

Airborne Testbed Characteristics

The aircraft will fly at altitudes selected to mimic MAE and Low Altitude UAV performance. The nominal range of AVS testbed operational altitudes will yield imaging slant ranges from 5,000 to 15,000 feet AGL. This, combined with appropriate optics, shall insure that the AVS system will be able to collect imagery that is somewhat degraded due to atmospherics (moisture, haze) and simultaneously mimic ground sampling distances (approximately 2 inches to 2.5 ft.) required for AVS technology subsystem development.
 
 

The EO/IR sensor will be a 512x512 InSb Focal Plane Array FLIR, with multiple FOV, computer controllable, optics selected to cover a range of pixel ground sampling distances from 2 inches at a slant range (SR) of 5000 feet to 2.5 feet from a SR of 15,000 feet.
 
 

The testbed skyball and gimbal system will have:
The testbed GPS/INS system will have: The testbed communications link will be X-band CDL/LOS (with 130-270 Mbps).All testbed operations will be in line of sight (LOS) mode. A "satellite communications mimic" mode (lower effective bandwidth corresponding to non-line-of-sight links) will be provided to insure developed systems are right-sized and engineered for lower bandwidth. AVS Common Development Environment
 
 

The AVS SI will be responsible for providing ground station hardware and base software. Each individual TSRD will be required to develop their deliverable subsystems to be compatible with this subsystem. If the needs of a TSRD are not met by this subsystem, that TSRD must provide the necessary compatible hardware and software needed to integrate their deliverable into the existing ground station and airborne testbed systems. The minimum configuration of the AVS Common Development Environment is expected to include:
 
 

Hardware Environment Software Environment: III. AVS TSRD DELIVERABLES
 
 

Summary of Deliverables

The following section details the deliverables required under the AVS TSRD effort. The deliverables are broken out in the following manner:

In each section, the following will be described: Status and Expenditure Reports

(a) Status Report (DI-MGMT-80368) and Funds and Man-Hour Expenditure Report (DI-FNCL-80331). These are to be delivered either in the specified format, or the specified information may be supplied in contractor-determined format.

(b) Monthly Informal Electronic Mail Status Reports: Systems and Software Documentation
  1. TSRD Concept of Operations and High Level Design Document ( CONOPS/HLDD):
(c) TSRD Design Document

This document will capture the low-level detailed system design of individual TSRD’s and, at a minimum, will provide the entire AVS Team with a stable set of API’s for TSRD functions that may be used by other AVS program participants. It shall also include subsystem test and evaluation plans and contain the results for such tests asare required prior to the TSRD delivery of subsystems for integration.

TSRD Final Report

Scientific and Technical Reports (draft and reproducible Final Report), DI-MISC-80711/T. These are to be delivered either in the specified format, or the specified information may be supplied in contractor-determined format.
 
 

Presentation Material

Presentation Material, in contractor format.
 
 

Hardware and Software Deliverables
 
 

Software Deliverables in Support of AVS Integration Efforts
 
  All AVS participants will make internal program software deliveries to other program participants to support ongoing system development, integration, evaluation and demonstration efforts. These deliveries will be made either electronically or via magnetic media and will occur at multiple times during the year to support integration and subsystem or system fix and upgrade efforts.
 
 

The TSRD contractors shall make multiple deliveries annually of their subsystem software to the AVS SI. These deliveries must include all source code and associated documentation. These deliveries will include all software subsystems developed under this effort as well as all software necessary to configure, set up, and execute the subsystems. These delivery items shall be delivered with government purpose rights as defined in the DFARS.
 
 

The AVS TSRD’s shall receive from the AVS SI multiple deliveries of such CAGS subsystems, TSRD subsystems and TSRD modules as are needed (as determined by the DARPA program manager) to support individual TSRD development. These deliveries must include all source code and associated documentation. These deliveries will include software subsystems developed under this effort as well as all software necessary to configure, set up, and execute the delivered subsystems or modules. These delivery items shall be delivered with government purpose rights as defined in the DFARS.
 
 

These deliveries will be provided in commonly agreed upon formats that will be specifically determined in the program-wide system design effort leading up to the Critical Design Review in late FY 1998.
 
 

Any proprietary and/or restrictive limitations on these delvieries must be thoroughly explained and justified in sections C and K of the proposal. If there are proprietary claims, the TSRD offeror must explain how these affect their ability to deliver subsystems and tool kits for integration into the AVS testbed system. Additionally offerors must explain how AVS program goals are achievable in light of these proprietary and/or restrictive limitations.
 
 

Software Deliverables in Support of Technology Transfer
 
  Since technology transfer and insertion is very important to all DARPA efforts, the Government Technical Representative may, at dates to be determined during the course of the contract, direct that the contractor make an additional 4 single copy software distributions (containing the complete developed subsystem or system at the time). These additional distributions (which will include current versions of associated system and software documentation) may be made to other government contractors or government representatives (to be determined) for technology transfer and insertion. The contractor will be appropriately notified of these distributions and given sufficient time to prepare them. These delivery items shall be delivered with government purpose rights as defined in the DFARS.
 
Final Hardware and Software Deliverables
 
  At the close of the contractual effort, the AVS TSRD’s shall deliver all software, hardware and supporting engineering and technical documentation developed under or used in conjunction with activities funded under this BAA, in contractor format.
 
 

A copy of all software and will be delivered to the Government Technical Representative, in mutually agreed magnetic media format. These deliveries must include all source code and associated documentation. These deliveries will include software subsystems developed under this effort as well as all software necessary to configure, set up, and execute the delivered subsystems or modules. These delivery items shall be delivered with government purpose rights as defined in the DFARS.
 
 

Disposition for all hardware purchased under the contract shall be specified at the close of the contractual effort.
 
 

Meetings, Reviews and Demonstrations

The following meetings, reviews and demonstrations are Program Deliverable Items (see Section IV of the PIP for greater detail ):
 
 

All Quarterly Program Meetings, including: The Program Kickoff Meeting

The Critical Design Review

Annual System Demonstrations

Demonstration Coordination Meetings

Interim Status Reviews
 
 

TSRD Briefings at the AVS SI Industry Briefing

In early November of 1997, selected AVS TSRD offerors will be notified of their potential selection for the AVS Program. Selectees will be requested to prepare and present approximately 30-45 minute briefings on their technical approaches at an AVS SI Industry Briefing to be held in the Arlington, VA area in late November. Selectees will also be requested to provide any additional documentation they deem necessary to augment the presentations. This briefing and documentation is intended to provide salient design information and TSRD-specific CAGS and other development requirements to potential AVS SI offerors.
 
 

To facilitate the rapid execution of this work package, this task should have a separate and distinct statement of work element and associated costs in the proposal. It is suggested that this effort should involve no more than 1 person-month of labor and associated travels costs for one person for one day to Arlington, VA.
 
 

This briefing should generally cover the following:
 
 

AVS Unclassified

The AVS program, in order to facilitate intra-program collaboration and technology transfer, will work at the unclassified level. The TSRD offerors should specify what unclassified imagery or existing information may be used to support the AVS effort.
 
 

Although all TSRDs are to utilize unclassified data in their deliveries and demonstrations, the PVR contractor is encouraged to apply methods and conventions consistent with those used in classified environments. Such conventions will permit the various subsystems and final system to be more extensible in possibly accommodating classified data in the future.
 
 
 
 

IV. PROGRAM SCHEDULE
 
 

Pre-award Significant Dates
 
 

28 August 1997 Industry Briefing for AVS Technology Subsystem Research and Development (TSRD) Efforts
 
 

7 October 1997 AVS TSRD Proposal Due Date, BAA 97-42 Closes
 
 

7 November 1997 (Estimated) Selected AVS TSRDs Notified of Potential

Selection for AVS Program. Selectees are requested to prepare

briefings on their technical approaches to present at an Industry

Briefing for an AVS SI Effort
 
 

14 November 1997 (Estimated) Release of solicitation for an AVS Systems

Integration (SI) Effort
 
 

21 November 1997 (Estimated) Industry Briefing for AVS SI Effort. Selected

TSRDs will Present Their Technical Approaches
 
 

23 December 1997 (Estimated) Due date for AVS SI proposals. AVS SI

solicitation closes.
 
 

1 March 1998 Contract Awards for AVS TSRDs and SI. All participants

start preparations for prgroam kickoff meeting
 
 

2 April 1998 AVS Program Kickoff Meeting
 
 
 
 

TSRD Industry Briefing

On 28 August 1997, an unclassified informational briefing to potential offerors of AVS TSRDs will be held from 0900 to 1700 EDT at the Holiday Inn, 4610 N. Fairfax Drive, Arlington, VA. This briefing was the subject of a previous CBD announcement.
 
 

This briefing will cover AVS program goals as well as past or ongoing government efforts which have developed technology relevant to AVS goals and objectives. Notification to DARPA of attendance must be made by 1500 EDT on 22 August 1997 via email message to avs_program @darpa.mil or by fax to avs_program at 703 696-2201. The message must include the following information: name of attendee(s), title, organization, department or company division, phone, fax, and electronic mail address. If requested attendance exceeds capacity, it may be necessary to limit attendance and organizations will be so notified.
 
 

TSRD Proposals Due Date

Complete proposals must be submitted by 1600 EDT on 7 October 1997 to:
 
 

BAA 97-42

DARPA/ISO

Attn: Dr.Thomas M. Strat

3701 North Fairfax Drive

Arlington, Virginia 22203-1714
 
 

Notification of Potential Selection for the AVS Program

TSRD Briefings at the AVS SI Industry Briefing

On or about 7 November 1997, selected TSRD offerors will be notified that they have been potentially selected for award on the AVS Program. They will be instructed to prepare and present a briefing about their TSRD at an Industry Briefing for potential AVS SI offerors that will be held on or about 21 November 1997. The content of this briefing is described in section III of this document. Pre-contract cost authorizations will be made to cover this SOW element.
 
 

Expected Award Date, Anticipated Period of Performance

The expected award date for all categories is 1 March 1998. Although the length of individual efforts should vary with level of difficulty and number of tasks, base contracts for each work package will be awarded through FY00, with optional periods of performance to be awarded, based on performance, in FY01 and FY02.
 
 

Quarterly Program Meetings

Quarterly AVS program-wide coordination meetings will be the most important schedule element for the AVS Program. In these, plans and designs for the next major programmatic milestone (either demonstration or field exercise) will be reviewed, updated, and approved by the customer. Results from previous evaluations will be presented and all major design documents will be updated, presented, and reviewed. These meetings will be held at various sites throughout the country. The program sponsor, program steering committee, NVESD AIRBORNE TESTBED, AVS SI and each TSRD contractor will attend these meetings. For costing purposes, proposers should assume that 75% of these meetings will be held on the east coast, at or near NVESD, at either Fort Belvoir or Fort A. P. Hill, VA. The remaining meetings will be held at west coast locations. Note that these quarterly meetings are Program Deliverable items and are therefore referenced in Section III of this PIP.
 
 
 
 

Program Kickoff Meeting The initial quarterly meeting will be the AVS Program Kickoff meeting, to be held on 2 April 1998, thirty-two days after the anticipated program awards. At this meeting, the AVS SI will present proposed outlines for all Systems and Software Documentation: the CONOPS, CAGS Design and individual TSRD Design documents, all in contractor format. The Program Manager may either approve or request modification of these documents at this time.
 
 

At this meeting, all teams will also work together to develop a program-wide plan aimed at achieving a successful airborne system demonstration in the fall of 1999.

Note that this meeting is a Program Deliverable item and is therefore referenced in Section III of this PIP.
 
 
 
 

Critical Design Review The quarterly meeting scheduled for September 1998 will be the forum for the AVS system Critical Design Review, and will be held by the AVS SI. At this time, coordination of the task assignments associated with the CAGS and each of the TSRD subsystems shall be finalized. Completed versions of all Systems and Software Documents will also be presented by the SI and TSRD’s at this time. In order to facilitate this, each TSRD contractor must have submitted their CONOPS and TSRD Design Documents to the SI a minimum of 15 days in advance of this review. Note that this meeting is a Program Deliverable item and is therefore referenced in Section III of this PIP.
 
System Demonstrations Major system demonstrations will occur in September of 1998, 1999 and 2000. These demonstrations will be coordinated with the corresponding fall quarterly meetings. These experiments and evaluations should show incremental progress towards the incremental goals suggested in Section II of this document. Additionally, demonstrations will be scheduled in conjunction with field exercises late in 2001 and 2002.
 
  1998 - First laboratory demonstrations showing initial technical progress.

1999 - Laboratory and airborne demonstrations and mission evaluations of integrated single- and multiple-mode TSRD missions. Demonstration of initial operational capability of the AVS testbed and CAGS system.

2000 - Laboratory and airborne demonstrations and mission evaluations of integrated single- and multiple-mode TSRD missions, showing incremental improvement in capability and robustness.

2001 - Laboratory and airborne demonstrations and mission evaluations of integrated single- and multiple-mode TSRD missions, showing incremental improvement in capability and robustness. These demonstrations will be coordinated, as possible, with field exercises.

2002 - Final laboratory and airborne demonstrations and comprehensive mission evaluations of TSRD missions, showcasing system capabilities and robustness. These demonstrations will also be coordinated, as possible, with field exercises.
 
 

In conjunction with the fall demonstrations, the September quarterly meetings will be used for review of program status to date and for initial high-level planning of activities for the coming year. Note that these demonstrations are Program Deliverable items and are therefore referenced in Section III of this PIP.
 
Demonstration Coordination Meetings In order to prepare for the year-end demonstrations listed above, the January quarterly meetings will function as programmatic coordination meetings to review the evaluation results of the previous demonstration, review the current program status and refine high-level plans for the coming year. Updated versions of all Systems and Software Documentation will also be reviewed at this time. To insure adequate development and test time for TSRD technology, detailed and finalized plans for the next year must be completed prior to these meetings. Note that these quarterly meetings are Program Deliverable items and are therefore referenced in Section III of this PIP.
 
Interim Status Reviews In March and June of each program year, the quarterly meetings will function as interim programmatic status reviews. These meetings will provide a forum for review of the latest results from TSRD experiments and any other incremental progress towards the year-end demonstrations.
 
 

Technology subsystem developers should plan to conduct and report on experiments and evaluations of their subsystem's evolving capabilities. These experiments should be designed to:
 
 

    1. show incremental progress towards the next major integration milestone;
    2. facilitate later integration by delivering early, less capable versions to the integrator;
    3. allow the developer to perform trade-off analyses on approaches in individual subsystems; and
    4. give the AVS program community visibility into subsystem progress and capability.
The evaluations of these experiments should be proposed to and approved by the DARPA program manager or designated agent. These evaluations should precede module delivery to AVS integrators, approximately two months prior to the major system integration and evaluation activities described above. The evaluations will be reviewed at the Interim Status Reviews to monitor progress, determine performance and set directions for further development. Each TSRD contractor must provide updated CONOPS and TSRD Documents to the SI a minimum of 15 days prior to each of these meetings, so that the SI can provide incremental updates to the Systems and Software Documentation. Note that these quarterly meetings are Program Deliverable items and are therefore referenced in Section III of this PIP.
 
AVS CONOPS Working Group The government will assemble a CONOPS working group to participate in the quarterly meetings and review AVS designs and plans. The working group will be composed of government and contractor representatives from UAV and surveillance organizations. The interaction between the working group and the AVS team will serve to: (a) provide the AVS team with a user focus to insure relevance; (b) inform the team about current and future UAV technology and missions; (c) inform the user community about emerging AVS technology; and (d) foster technology transfer. The AVS team will be encouraged to establish contacts with the working group outside of the quarterly meetings to help focus ongoing design and planning efforts.
 
Program Schedule - Proposers’ Design and Schedule of Major Subsystem Experiments and Demonstrations, System Integration and Evaluation

Proposals from TSRD subsystem developers should include detailed descriptions of major capability goals, performance goals, informal evaluations and formal evaluations for their individual subsystems at the major AVS integration and evaluation dates above. These plans should include estimates of the amount and kind of data needed to conduct evaluation. These goals and evaluation plans will be reviewed and coordinated in program-wide meetings after program initiation.
 
 
 
 
 
 

V. EVALUATION CRITERIA
 
 

Proposals and abstracts will be selected through a technical/scientific/business decision process with technical and scientific considerations being most important.
 
 

Evaluations of the TSRD submissions
 
 

Criteria A-D are primary evaluation criteria for TSRD submissions and are listed in order of priority.
 
 

(A) The quality and technical merit of offeror's technical solution, including:

(B) The capabilities and experience of offeror to perform the work, including: (C) The relevance of the proposed TSRD approach to the AVS program goals and to battlespace awareness missions, including: (D) The offerors approach to technology transfer, including: Criteria E, the realism of the cost proposal, will be evaluated separately, secondary to the Criteria (A-D) listed above.

(E) The cost realism and value of proposal to government, including:


 
 

VI. PROPOSAL PREPARATION AND DELIVERY

Independent organizations and teams are encouraged to submit proposals in any or all areas. However, offerors must be willing to cooperate and exchange software, data and other information in an integrated program with other contractors, as well as with a prime contractor or integrator, chosen by DARPA.
 
 

An original and eight (8) copies each of the Technical and Cost proposals must be submitted to:
 
 

BAA 97-42

DARPA/ISO

Attn: Dr. Thomas M. Strat

3701 North Fairfax Drive

Arlington, Virginia 22203-1714
 
 

Proposals are due by 1600 EDT on Tuesday, 7 October 1997
 
 

PROPOSALS SENT BY FAX OR E-MAIL WILL BE DISREGARDED.
 
 

Proposals shall consist of two separately bound volumes. (Do not use 3 ring binders.) Volume I shall provide the technical proposal and management approach. Volume II shall address cost.
 
 

Proposals shall contain a Table of Contents, in both Volumes I and II.
 
 

The proposals shall be prepared in the following format:

Page Limitations: Volume I of the proposal shall consist of the cover page, table of contents, plus not more than 45 additional pages (excluding sections Q and R). Volume II is limited to 20 pages (excluding the cover page and table of contents). Limitations within sections are indicated in the individual descriptions.
 
 

Note: Proposals with less than the maximum number of allowed pages will not be penalized. Proposals exceeding the page limit will not be reviewed. Offerors are encouraged to submit concise, but descriptive, proposals.
 
 

VOLUME I: Technical Proposal
 
 

Volume I of the proposals shall include the following sections, each starting on a new page. Page limits apply to all submissions.
 
 

Cover Page: This must include:

administrative contact (name, address, phone/fax, electronic mail address), AVS TSRD: Precision Video Registration (PVR)

AVS TSRD: Multiple Target Surveillance (MTS)

AVS TSRD: Activity Monitoring (AM)

AVS TSRD: Other AVS Techniques

Table of Contents
 
 

A. Executive Summary: (Limit: 2 pages) The summary should include: (1) a visionary system description that supports the goals of the BAA, (2) innovative ideas proposed, (3) the expected impact of the effort if successful, (4) description of capabilities to be demonstrated, and (5) the major project deliverables.
 
 

B. Vision: (Limit: 3 pages) This must describe a hypothetical, yet relevant, advanced concept. Explain how the proposed technology development would contribute to improved Battlespace awareness, and how it could be incorporated into current or hypothetical military or intelligence information systems. What minimum level of AVS competence would be needed to realize the vision? What additional technology beyond the scope of the proposed effort would be necessary to realize the vision?
 
 

C. Deliverables and Products: (Limit: 4 pages) This section must enumerate the deliverables of the proposed effort, and the due date for each. The list must include those deliverables specifically required by this BAA, plus any additional deliverables that are offered.
 
 

D. Schedule and Milestones: (Limit: 3 pages) A summary of the schedule and milestones for the proposed effort. Milestones must be specific and goal or performance oriented.
 
 

E. Statement of Work (SOW): (Limit: 5 pages) This section must detail the scope, background, objective and approach of the proposed effort and describe the content and timing of specific tasks to be performed and specific utilization of subcontractors. Include here a detailed listing of the technical tasks/subtasks organized by contract year. Also identify which personnel and subcontractors (if any) will be involved. The SOW will include proposal Sections C, D, H, I, and J by reference.
 
 

F. Technical Rationale: (Limit: 9 pages) The technical rationale section must include technical arguments to substantiate claims made in Section A, a technical approach description consistent with Section B, and a comparison with other ongoing research indicating both advantages and disadvantages of the proposed effort/approach. Include a discussion of design decisions made.
 
 

G. Demonstration Plan: (Limit 3 pages) This section will describe all laboratory and airborne demonstrations to be conducted as part of the proposed TSRD effort. It will clearly state the purpose of each demonstration, and state expected performance levels. If support from other organizations is expected or required as part of any of these demonstrations, these expectations must be stated. Additionally, any expected data issues and requirements need to be addressed in this section.
 
 

H. Evaluation Plan: (Limit: 4 pages) This section describes the critical experiments to be performed by the TSRD developer, the data to be used, the evaluation metrics to be applied, and the software instrumentation and test plans to facilitate repeatable experimentation. This section must include a description of the metrics (especially for enabling technology efforts) that will be used for evaluating the impact of the proposed effort, and the performance goal needed to achieve the vision described in Section B.
 
 

I. Management Plan: (Limit: 2 pages) This section describes the overall approach to management of this effort, including a very brief discussion of the organization, use of personnel, project/function/subcontractor relationships, government research and facility interface, and planning, scheduling and control practices.
 
 

J. Technology Transition Plan: (Limit: 2 pages) This section should contain a clear description of how results will be made sharable throughout the AVS program and what use these results might be to other groups. In addition, this section should address specific innovative approaches the offeror will take to facilitate technology transition. The technology transition plan should identify the potential recipients and describe the overall approach to delivering results, products and technology.
 
 

K. Claims: (Limit: 1 page) Include here a summary of any proprietary claims to results, prototypes, or systems supporting and/or necessary for the use of the research, results, and/or prototype. Any claims made in other parts of the proposal (such as Sections A and C) that would impact the claims in this section must be cross referenced. If there are proprietary claims, the TSRD offeror must explain how these affect their ability to deliver subsystems and toolkits for integration into the AVS testbed system. Additionally offerors must explain how AVS program goals are achievable in light of these proprietary and/or restrictive limitations. If there are no proprietary claims this section shall consist of a statement to that effect.
 
 

L. Facilities: (Limit: 1 page) Include here a description of the facilities that would be used for the proposed effort.
 
 

M. Security Plan: (Limit: 1 page) To the maximum extent possible, the AVS program will operate at the unclassified level. However, if a proposer has significant justification for using classified data for their proposed effort, the proposer must state what level of security is required to carry out the effort. If access to classified information is required, provide information specific to secure facilities, including storage and disposal of classified materials, security personnel (officer) and procedures to be employed. Also include the clearances in place and those that would be required to carry out the project. Discuss limitations foreseen. (Reference AVS Unclassified, GFE section in Section III).
 
 

N. Experience: (Limit: 3 pages) This section describes relevant capabilities, accomplishments, and work in these or closely related areas along with the qualifications of proposed subcontractors.
 
 

O. Key Personnel: (Limit: 1 page) Include a listing of key personnel along with the amount of effort to be expended by each person during each calendar year. If multiple proposals are being submitted in response to this BAA, separate personnel listings are needed for each proposal. If any key personnel are listed in multiple proposals, a clear indication of these individuals' division of time between contracts if multiple awards are made is required.
 
 

P. Resumés/Qualifications: (Limit: 1 page per key person) This section contains a concise summary of the qualifications of listed key personnel along with other major sources of support for them. (This section is not included in the page limit.)
 
 

Q. Bibliography: Include here a bibliography of relevant technical papers and research notes which support the technical ideas in this proposal. (This section is not included in the page limit.)
 
 

R. Non Proprietary TSRD Description Supporting AVS SI Solicitation: (Limit: 6 pages) This section shall, in general, include the information described in "TSRD Briefings at the AVS SI Industry Briefing" described in section III of this document. This section shall be non-proprietary and it will be distributed to all potential AVS SI offerors via the WWW and other means at the opening of the AVS SI solicitation. (This section is not included in the page limit. It will not be included in the proposal evaluation.)
 
 

VOLUME II: Cost Proposal
 
 

In general, the cost proposal should provide for a phased program over the duration of the project, supported by detailed breakdowns. Volume II of the proposal shall consist of a (A) Budget Cover Page and not more than 20 additional pages of detail, B) Budget Summary, part 1 and 2, C) Budget Details, and D) OCI Statement. Details of any cost sharing to be undertaken by the offeror should also be included in the cost section. An SF1411 is required for the submission of your proposal.
 
 

A. Cover Page:
Financial Year
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
Total
Period of Performance 1 Mar. - 30 Nov. 1 Dec. - 30 Nov. 1 Dec. - 30 Nov. 1 Dec. - 30 Nov. 1 Dec. - 30 Nov.  
Base $ XXX $ XXX $ XXX $ XXX $ XXX  
Option1            
Option 2            
           
B. Budget Summary:
 
 

Part 1 (one page): Detailed breakdown for all costs by calendar year:
 
 

Part 2 (one page): Cost breakdown by task / sub-task using the same task numbers as in Technical Proposal SOW, Volume I, section E. Options must be costed individually.
 
 

C. Budget Details: Include any other relevant details that support section A above.
 
 

Each cost proposal shall contain a section which identifies the offeror's Taxpayers Identification Number (TIN), DFARS 204.7202-3; Corporate and Government Entity (CAGE) code, DFARS 204.7202-1; and Contractor Establishment Code (CEC), DFARS 204.7202-2. The codes provided shall be those of the offeror and not of the principal place of performance, if the two are different.
 
 

D. Organizational Conflict of Interest
 
 

Each proposal shall contain a section satisfying the requirements of the following: Awards made under this BAA are subject to the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subpart 9.5, Organizational Conflict of Interest. All offerors and proposed subcontractors must affirmatively state whether they are supporting any DARPA technical office(s) through an active contract or subcontract. All affirmations must state which office(s) the offeror supports and identify the prime contract number. Affirmations shall be furnished at the time of proposal submission. All facts relevant to the existence or potential existence of organizational conflicts of interest, as that term is defined in FAR 9.501, must be disclosed. This disclosure shall include a description of the action the Contractor has taken, or proposes to take, to avoid, neutralize or mitigate such conflict. If the offeror believes that no such conflict exists, then it shall so state in this section.
 
 
 
 

VII. TECHNICAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION
 
 

1. Technical or contractual questions shall be emailed to <[email protected]>. If the offeror does not have access to email, technical and contractual questions may be faxed to (703) 696-2201. However, email is preferred. Refer to FAQ file for answer.
 
 

2. DARPA provides the Proposer Information Package (PIP), as well as a BAA 97-42 FAQ file and supporting documentation on the World Wide Web. The URL: http://www.darpa.mil/baa. The Airborne Video Surveillance Program may be found under the Information Systems Office (ISO) page.
 
 

3. Facsimile and Electronic mail: If the offeror does not have access to the WWW, a request for the PIP may be emailed to [email protected] or faxed to 703 696-2201, ATTN: BAA97-42 INFORMATION. Clearly indicate the items requested. The message must include the name of the POC, phone number, fax number, and surface mail address to insure proper delivery. Information will be surface mailed. Be aware that surface mail will require more response time than other methods.
 
 

4. Surface mail: If the offeror does not have access to e-mail, WWW or a FAX machine, written requests may be sent to: BAA 97-42 INFORMATION, 3701 N. Fairfax Drive, Arlington, VA 22203. Clearly indicate the items requested. The request must include the name of the POC, phone number, and surface mail address to insure proper delivery. Information will be surface mailed. Be aware that surface mail will require more response time than other methods.
 
 
 
 

VIII. OTHER IMPORTANT ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION
 
 

DARPA intends to use E-mail for some correspondence regarding BAA 97-42; however, proposals may NOT be submitted by fax or e-mail. PROPOSALS SENT BY FAX OR E-MAIL WILL BE DISREGARDED. The Government reserves the right to select for award all, some or none of the proposals received in response to this announcement. All responsible sources may submit a proposal which shall be considered by the Agency. Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) and Minority Institutions (MI) are encouraged to submit proposals and join others in submitting proposals, however, no portion of this BAA will be set aside for HBCU and MI participation due to the impracticality of reserving discrete or severable areas of technology for exclusive competition among these entities.
 
 

This PIP, along with the Commerce Business Daily (CBD) announcement, constitutes a Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) as contemplated in FAR 6.102 (d)(2)(i). Prospective offerors MUST also refer to this PIP before submitting a proposal. DARPA anticipates that initial contractor selections will be made during the first quarter of the Government Fiscal Year 1998.
 
 

Protection of Information: It is the policy of DARPA to treat all proposals as competitive information and to disclose the contents only for the purposes of evaluation. The Government may use selected support contractor personnel to assist in administrative functions only.
 
 
 
 
 
 

APPENDIX A - AVS ACRONYMS
 
 

3D Three Dimensional

AGL Above Ground Level

AM Activity Monitoring

API Application Program Interface

AVS Airborne Video Surveillance

CAGS Core Air/Ground System

CDL Carrier Data Link

CONOPS Concepts of Operations

EO Electro-Optical

FOV Field of View

GFE Government Furnished Equipment

GPS/INS Global Positioning System/Inertial Navigation System

HCI Human Computer Interface

IA Imagery Analyst

IR Infrared

LOC Lines of Communication

LOS Line of Sight

MAE Medium Altitude Endurance

MTBF Mean Time Between Failure

MTS Multiple Target Surveillance

NVESD Night Vision & Electronic Sensors Directorate (USA)

PVR Precision Video Registration

RMS Root-Mean-Square

ROM Rough Order of Magnitude

SCR Signal-to-Clutter Ratio

SEI Systems Engineering and Integration

SEP Spherical Error Probability

SI Systems Integrator

SNR Signal-to-Noise Ratio

SR Slant Range

TCT Time Critical Targets

TSRD Technology Subsystem Research and Development

UAV Unmanned Aerial Vehicle