U.S. Strategic Nuclear Forces, and More from CRS

New and updated reports from the Congressional Research Service that have been withheld from broad public distribution include the following. U.S. Strategic Nuclear Forces: Background, Developments, and Issues, updated November 3, 2015 The New START Treaty: Central Limits and Key Provisions, updated November 3, 2015 Iran Sanctions, updated November 3, 2015 Tropical Storm? The Supreme […]

Read More

Police Use of Force, and More from CRS

What are the constitutional limits on police use of force? What remedies are available when those limits are exceeded? And in light of recent episodes of police violence, how might the limits and the remedies be modified? Those questions are addressed in a new report from the Congressional Research Service. “By the very nature of their job, […]

Read More

Advisory Committee Meetings Often Closed, and More from CRS

The 1972 Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA), one of the “open government” laws, generally mandates that federal advisory committee meetings be held openly, except under certain specified circumstances. But over the past ten years, the number of closed meetings has actually increased, a new analysis by the Congressional Research Service found. “FY2014 reported the highest […]

Read More

A Reporter’s Privilege Workaround, and More from CRS

New and updated reports from the Congressional Research Service include the following. Privilege Against Self-Incrimination Supplements Journalist Privilege, CRS Legal Sidebar, October 20, 2015 Supreme Court Appointment Process: President’s Selection of a Nominee, October 19, 2015 Supreme Court Appointment Process: Consideration by the Senate Judiciary Committee, October 19, 2015 Supreme Court Appointment Process: Senate Debate […]

Read More

FAS Roundup: October 20, 2015

Stay tuned for the October 2015 FAS Nuclear Notebook, available for viewing on fas.org tomorrow. Co-authored by Hans M. Kristensen and Robert S. Norris and published bi-monthly in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, each issue of the Nuclear Notebook provides a snapshot of a nuclear-armed country weapons programs or a global nuclear weapons matter. This […]

Read More

Creating a Community for Global Security

Imagine thousands and potentially millions of scientists committed to making the world safer and more secure. This was the vision of the dedicated group of “atomic scientists” who founded the Federation of Atomic Scientists (the original FAS) in November 1945. As we will soon reach the 70th anniversary, let’s reflect on the meaning of FAS […]

Read More

A Social Science Perspective on International Science Engagement

In the previous issue of the Public Interest Report (Spring 2015), Dr. Charles Ferguson’s President’s Message focused on the importance of empathy in science and security engagements. This was a most welcome surprise, as concepts such as empathy do not typically make it to the pages of technical scientific publications. Yet the social and behavioral […]

Read More

Review of Benjamin E. Schwartz’s Right of Boom: The Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism (Overlook Press, 2015)

Roadside bombs were devastating to American troops in both Iraq and Afghanistan. The press has categorized the moment prior to such an explosion as “left of boom,” and that following the explosion as “right of boom.” Defense Department analyst, Benjamin E. Schwartz, has chosen to title his book about nuclear terrorism, Right of Boom. While […]

Read More