95-836 PDF

Calendar No. 700

108TH CONGRESS

Report

SENATE

2d Session

108-346
FOREIGN OPERATIONS, EXPORT FINANCING, AND RELATED PROGRAMS APPROPRIATION BILL, 2005

September 16, 2004- Ordered to be printed
Filed under authority of the order of the Senate of January 7, 2003
Mr. MCCONNELL, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the following
REPORT
[To accompany S. 2812]

The Committee on Appropriations reports the bill (S. 2812) making appropriations for foreign operations, export financing, and related programs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2005, and for other purposes, reports favorably thereon and recommends that the bill do pass.

Amounts in new budget authority
Fiscal year 2004 appropriations $38,717,018,000
Fiscal year 2005 budget estimate 21,360,830,000
Amount of bill as reported to Senate 19,578,500,000
Bill as recommended to Senate compared to:
2004 appropriations -19,138,518,000
Budget estimate -1,782,330,000

CONTENTS Page
Glossary of Terms 4
Summary of Total Budget Authority in the Bill 6
Introduction 6
Title I--Export and Investment Assistance: Export-Import Bank of the United States
7
Overseas Private Investment Corporation
8
Trade and Development Agency
8
Title II--Bilateral Economic Assistance: Bilateral Assistance
9
Child Survival and Health Programs Fund
9
Development Assistance
16
International Disaster and Famine Assistance
39
Transition Initiatives
39
Development Credit Authority
39
Payment to the Foreign Service Retirement and Disability Fund
39
Operating Expenses of the United States Agency for International Development
40
Capital Investment Fund
40
Operating Expenses of the Office of the Inspector General
40
Other Bilateral Economic Assistance: Economic Support Fund
40
Assistance for Eastern Europe and the Baltic States
44
Assistance for the Independent States of the Former Soviet Union
46
Independent Agencies: Inter-American Foundation
49
African Development Foundation
49
Peace Corps
49
Millennium Challenge Corporation
50
Department of State: Global HIV/AIDS Initiative
50
International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement
51
Andean Counterdrug Initiative
52
Migration and Refugee Assistance
54
Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance Fund
55
Nonproliferation, Antiterrorism, Demining, and Related Programs
55
Conflict Response Fund
57
Department of the Treasury: International Affairs Technical Training
58
Debt Restructing
58
Title III--Military Assistance: International Military Education and Training
59
Foreign Military Financing
59
Peacekeeping Operations
60
Title IV--Multilateral Economic Assistance: International Financial Institutions Summary
61
International Bank for Reconstruction and Development: Global Environment Facility
62
International Development Association
62
Inter-American Development Bank: Multilateral Investment Fund
62
Asian Development Bank: Asian Development Fund
62
African Development Bank: African Development Fund
63
European Bank for Reconstruction and Development: International Fund for Agricultural Development
63
International Organizations and Programs
63
Title V--General Provisions 65
Compliance With Paragraph 7, Rule XVI of the Standing Rules of the Sen- ate 68
Compliance With Paragraph 7(c), Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of the Senate 68
Compliance With Paragraph 12, Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of the Senate 69
Budget Impact Statement 70

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

ACI--Andean Counterdrug Initiative

ADB--Asian Development Bank

ADF--African Development Foundation

ASEAN--Association of Southeast Asian Nations

ASHA--American Schools and Hospitals Abroad

ATA--Anti-Terrorism Assistance

CASS--Cooperative Association of States for Scholarships

CCD--Consortium for Citizens and Disabilities

CITES--Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species

CSHPF--Child Survival Health Programs Fund

CTBT--Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Preparatory Commission

DA--Development Assistance

DRL--Department of State, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor

DROC--Democratic Republic of the Congo

ERMA--Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance Fund

ESF--Economic Support Fund

EU--European Union

FAO--Food and Agriculture Organization

FMF--Foreign Military Financing

FSA--Assistance for the Independent States of the Former Soviet Union

GHI--Global HIV/AIDS Initiative

IAEA--International Atomic Energy Agency

IAF--Inter-American Foundation

ICAO--International Civil Aviation Organization

IDFA--International Disaster and Famine Assistance

IDP--Internally displaced person

IFAD--International Fund for Agricultural Development

IFI--International Financial Institution

IMET--International Military Education and Training

IMO--International Maritime Organization

INCLE--Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

IO&P--International Organization and Programs

IPCC--International Panel on Climate Change

ITTO--International Tropical Timber Organization

IUCN--World Conservation Union

MCC--Millennium Challenge Corporation

MDB--Multilateral Development Bank

MEPI--Middle East Partnership Initiative

MRA--Migration and Refugee Assistance

NADR--Nonproliferation, Anti-Terrorism, Demining, and Related Programs

NATO--North Atlantic Treaty Organization

NED--National Endowment for Democracy

NGO--Nongovernmental organization

NLD--National League for Democracy

OAS--Organization of American States

OPIC--Overseas Private Investment Corporation

OTI--Office of Transition Initiatives

PKO--Peacekeeping Operations

SEED--Assistance for Eastern European and Baltic States

SPDC--State Peace and Development Council (Burma)

TB--Tuberculosis

TDA--Trade and Development Agency

U.N- United Nations

UNAIDS--Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS

UNDP--United Nations Development Program

UNEP--United Nations Environment Program

UNESCO--United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

UNFCCC--United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

UN-HABITAT--United Nations Center for Human Settlements

UNHCR--United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees

UNICEF--United Nations Children's Fund

UNIFEM--United Nations Development Fund for Women

USAID--United States Agency for International Development

WFP--World Food Program

WHO--World Health Organization

WID--Women in Development

WTO--World Trade Organization

SUMMARY TABLE: AMOUNTS IN NEW BUDGET AUTHORITY
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Item                          Budget request Committee recommendation Committee recommendation compared with budget estimate  increase (+) or decrease (-) 
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Export Assistance                 $5,925,000              -$5,075,000                                                                         -$11,000,000 
Bilateral Economic Assistance 14,406,494,000           12,981,520,000                                                                       -1,424,974,000 
Military Assistance            5,151,230,000            4,971,230,000                                                                         -180,000,000 
Multilateral Assistance        1,797,181,000            1,408,825,000                                                                         -316,356,000 
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

INTRODUCTION

In fiscal year 2004, the Committee appropriated $38,717,018,000 for foreign operations and related programs, including supplemental appropriations. This year, the Committee has provided $19,578,500,000, of which $19,386,000,000 is for discretionary spending, $150,000,000 is for emergency spending, and $42,500,000 is for mandatory spending.

TITLE I

EXPORT AND INVESTMENT ASSISTANCE

EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES

INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2004 ...........................
Budget estimate, 2005 $1,140,000
Committee recommendation 1,140,000

SUBSIDY APPROPRIATION

Appropriations, 2004 ...........................
Budget estimate, 2005 $125,700,000
Committee recommendation 115,700,000

ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2004 $72,465,000
Budget estimate, 2005 73,200,000
Committee recommendation 73,200,000

The Committee directs the Export-Import Bank to report not later than 90 days after enactment of this Act on the Bank's involvement with the iPSTAR project in Thailand, and, in particular, any prior knowledge the Bank had regarding potential activities of that project in Burma. The report should include an analysis of the financial benefits gained by the SPDC from the project.

The Committee expects the Bank to consult with the Committee prior to initiating any future activities directly involving Thailand, or directly or indirectly involving Burma.

The Committee directs the Bank to submit a report not later than 90 days after enactment of this Act, detailing, for calendar year 2004, the following: (1) the countries where the Bank provided financing related to the extraction of oil, gas, timber, coal or other minerals; (2) whether such countries have in place a functioning system for accounting for income and expenses, the independent auditing of such accounts, and the publication of such accounts and audits, in connection with the extraction of these resources; (3) whether such countries have formally joined the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative endorsed by the World Bank Group; and (4) the efforts such countries are making on their own behalf and on behalf of any state-owned enterprises concerned with the extraction of these resources to comply with the requirements of such Initiative, including the adoption of appropriate legislation to require such compliance.

OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION

SUBSIDY APPROPRIATION

DIRECT LOANS

Appropriations, 2004 $23,858,000
Budget estimate, 2005 24,000,000
Committee recommendation 24,000,000

ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2004 $41,141,000
Budget estimate, 2005 42,885,000
Committee recommendation 42,885,000

TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT AGENCY

Appropriations, 2004 $49,705,000
Budget estimate, 2005 50,000,000
Committee recommendation 49,000,000

The Committee again recommends that TDA increase support for programs and activities that assist countries in improving aviation security and safety, including developing training materials to prepare countries for International Civil Aviation Organization audits.

TITLE II

BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT

UNITED STATES AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Appropriations, 2004 $4,445,129,000
Emergency supplemental 166,600,000
Budget estimate, 2005 3,971,000,000
Committee recommendation 4,190,000,000

The amounts listed in the above table for fiscal year 2004 appropriations, the fiscal year 2005 budget estimate and the Committee recommendation, include funds appropriated or requested under child survival and health programs, development assistance, USAID operating expenses, USAID Inspector General operating expenses, mandatory retirement expenses, international disaster and famine assistance, transition initiatives, and credit programs.

CHILD SURVIVAL AND HEALTH PROGRAMS FUND

Appropriations, 2004 $1,824,174,000
Budget estimate, 2005 1,420,000,000
Committee recommendation 1,550,000,000

The Committee provides $1,550,000,000 for the CSHPF of which $345,000,000 is for child survival and maternal health.

The CSHPF supports programs and activities to reduce child mortality and morbidity, combat infectious diseases including HIV/AIDS, and address a wide range of other public health problems around the world. The Committee reiterates its strong support for a comprehensive approach to global health, with an emphasis on building local capacity in developing countries to conduct effective disease surveillance and deliver basic health services.

PROGRAM ISSUES

BLIND CHILDREN

The Committee is concerned that 1.5 million children are blind, and 7 million suffer from low vision. The Committee notes the work of Helen Keller International and other organizations to assist these children. The Committee recommends $1,700,000 for USAID's program for children's blindness.

CHILD WELFARE

The Committee continues to recognize the work of the Asia Injury Prevention Foundation's `Helmets for Kids' program and recommends that USAID support the activities of this organization.

The Committee supports the work of RUGMARK International to improve the lives of former child laborers and carpet weavers, and to increase market access for child labor free rugs. The Committee recommends USAID consider and fund a joint proposal of RUGMARK and Aid to Artisans for programs in South Asia.

DISPLACED CHILDREN AND ORPHANS FUND

The Committee supports programs to assist displaced children and orphans. The Committee is aware of the Hogar Divina Provindencia in Santa Tecla, El Salvador, which is home and school to 140 orphaned and abandoned children. The Committee is impressed with the services provided by the Hogar Divina Provindencia and recommends not less than $150,000 to support its activities.

FAMILY PLANNING/REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH

The Committee recommends a total of $450,000,000 for family planning/reproductive health programs, of which $375,000,000 is made available under the CSHPF.

The Committee is aware that unchecked population growth is a major cause of environmental degradation, and expects USAID to develop performance goals and indicators which promote cross-sectoral collaboration on community-based, population-health-environment programs, and to consult with the Committee regarding these goals and indicators.

The Committee is aware that in many developing countries there is still a large unmet need for family planning services, including contraceptives. This is due, in part to ignorance, misinformation about side effects, and fear, which can be effectively countered with public service announcements and other media programs, such as those of the Population Media Center. The Committee urges USAID to expand its use of the media to address the unmet need for family planning services. To be effective, these programs must be culturally sensitive and appropriately targeted. USAID should use surveys and other objective criteria for measuring results to maximize cost effectiveness.

HIV/AIDS

The Committee again commends the President for his commitment to combat HIV/AIDS, TB, and malaria, and provides a total of $2,417,000,000 from all accounts in this Act for this effort. This amount reflects an increase of $220,000,000 above the budget request.

The breakdown follows: $600,000,000 for HIV/AIDS from the CSHPF account; $175,000,000 for TB and malaria from the CSHPF and other bilateral accounts; $1,450,000,000 from the GHI account; $150,000,000 designated as emergency spending; $29,065,000 from the FSA account; $2,106,000 from the SEED account; $8,559,000 from the ESF account; $270,000 from the ACI account; and $2,000,000 from the FMF account.

The Committee provides a total of $400,000,000 for a U.S. contribution to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. The Committee strongly encourages other donors, particularly Germany, the United Kingdom, Canada, Japan, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, and the People's Republic of China, to increase their contributions to the Global Fund, and to fulfill their pledges in order to maximize the contribution by the United States.

As the Global Fund's anticipated needs in fiscal year 2005 reportedly total $3,600,000,000, the Committee expects the Global HIV/AIDS Coordinator to consult on how best to secure additional U.S. contributions to the Fund, to be expended in a timely manner, in future appropriations Acts. The Committee notes that in the fourth round of proposals, the Global Fund is expected to increase spending on malaria programs by 20 percent.

The Committee directs the Global HIV/AIDS Coordinator and USAID Administrator to communicate to all Federal departments and agencies, including Untied States embassies and USAID missions, that restrictions on the use of U.S. family planning assistance do not apply to organizations administering HIV/AIDS funds, as stipulated in the President's memorandum to the Secretary of State of August 29, 2003, and that well-qualified and experienced reproductive health organizations engaged in HIV/AIDS-related service delivery are to be considered for HIV/AIDS funding, even if the organization is otherwise ineligible for or is not receiving U.S. family planning assistance.

The Committee recommends that USAID and the Office of the Global HIV/AIDS Coordinator consider and fund the following activities relating to combating HIV/AIDS:

Affordable Medicines for Africa.--The Committee supports innovative programs to increase access to affordable drugs in Africa and elsewhere, and encourages USAID and the Office of the Global HIV/AIDS Coordinator to work with Affordable Medicines for Africa on the establishment of a pilot project in Africa.

Disabilities- The Committee is aware that many people with disabilities are at heightened risk of infection with HIV/AIDS, and that often care and treatment is expensive and physically inaccessible. The Committee urges the Global HIV/AIDS Coordinator to take steps to ensure that appropriate HIV/AIDS programs, including education and palliative care, address the needs of people with disabilities.

HIV/AIDS, Maternal and Child Health, and Family Planning Linkages- The Committee notes the high percentage of sexually transmitted HIV/AIDS cases and transmission of the virus perinatally or during breast feeding. The Committee recommends that the Global HIV/AIDS Coordinator promote greater linkages and coordination between family planning and maternal health programs and global HIV/AIDS activities.

The Committee recommends that additional funds be made available from existing funds within this Act for USAID for the procurement and distribution of condoms worldwide. To the maximum extent feasible, taking into consideration cost, timely availability, and best health practices, funds appropriated by this Act that are made available for condom procurement should be made available for the procurement of condoms manufactured in the United States.

JurisAids- The Committee recognizes the importance of safeguarding the rights of individuals living with HIV/AIDS and commends JurisAids for its legal clinic pilot project in San Louis, Senegal. The Committee supports the development of additional model legal clinics to protect the rights of people living with HIV/AIDS in West Africa.

Lott Carey International [LCI]- The Committee supports the efforts of LCI, an African-American faith-based organization, to mitigate the devastation caused by HIV/AIDS in Africa and the Caribbean, and is discouraged by the difficulties LCI has encountered in securing funds from USAID.

Media Programs- The Committee supports the work of YouthAIDS, an initiative of nonprofit organization Population Services International, which uses popular culture to mobilize the corporate world to reach millions of young people around the world with strategies for protecting themselves from HIV infection.

The Committee supports other USAID-funded media programs to combat HIV/AIDS in Africa and elsewhere, including those conducted by the Population Media Center. The Committee also supports media programs being implemented by Internews and recommends expansion to India.

Mercy Ships- The Committee encourages USAID and the Office of the Global HIV/AIDS Coordinator to work with Mercy Ships on the development of a medical hospital aboard a ship to provide HIV/AIDS-related treatment and education to people from countries with high HIV infection rates.

Needle Safety- The Committee recognizes that the use of contaminated needles in developing countries contributes to the spread of HIV/AIDS and supports funding for programs and activities, consistent with the approach specified on page 683 of the joint explanatory statement accompanying conference report 108-401, to address this problem.

Orphans.--The Committee remains concerned with the care and treatment of HIV/AIDS orphans, many of whom are infected with the virus. The Committee requests the Global HIV/AIDS Coordinator to consult with the Committee on the implementation of Subtitle B of Public Law 108-25, specifically with respect to creative and assertive approaches to assist HIV/AIDS orphans, including protection of land titles and property rights.

Pediatric HIV/AIDS Treatment- As an estimated 2.5 million children under the age of 15 years are infected with HIV/AIDS, the Committee encourages high priority be given to addressing pediatric treatment needs, including the development and purchase of high-quality, low-cost pediatric formulations of anti-retrovirals and other HIV/AIDS medicines, pediatric-specific training for doctors and other appropriate personnel, and the purchase of pediatric-appropriate diagnostic technologies.

The Committee requests the Global HIV/AIDS Coordinator, in consultation with the USAID Administrator, to submit a report to the Committee not later than 180 days after enactment of this Act describing the activities of all relevant government agencies regarding the treatment of children with HIV/AIDS for fiscal years 2003 and 2004, and proposed activities for 2005. For each fiscal year, the report should include: a description of the specific types of activities supported; the total number of children in treatment programs; the total amount of money devoted to pediatric treatment, including funding for the purchase of anti-retroviral drugs, pediatric-specific training of medical professionals and the purchase of pediatric-appropriate technologies; and, a description of activities to ensure that HIV/AIDS drugs, including fixed dose combinations, are available in pediatric formulations, and that they include appropriate dosing information for all pediatric subpopulations. The Committee also requests the Global HIV/AIDS Coordinator to consult with the Committee on proposed pediatric treatment activities for fiscal year 2006.

Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission and Care and Treatment [MTCT]- The Committee continues to support funding to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV/AIDS as an integral element of prevention. The Committee urges the Global HIV/AIDS Coordinator to support and expand both MTCT and care and treatment programs.

The Committee notes that preventing the transmission of HIV/AIDS from mother to child depends upon a multifaceted approach, including, but not limited to: voluntary and confidential counseling and testing services for pregnant women; antiretroviral prophylaxis for HIV-infected pregnant women and newborns; counseling and support for maternal nutrition and safe infant feeding practices; and preventing primary HIV infection in pregnant and lactating women and offering counseling or referral for family planning to HIV-infected women.

Safe Blood- The Committee supports the efforts of Safe Blood for Africa, which assists African nations through training and technical assistance, to develop systems to ensure that blood supplies are screened for HIV/AIDS and other communicable diseases.

United Families International Stay Alive Program [UFISAP]- The Committee reiterates its support for UFISAP's programs which focus on HIV/AIDS-preventative behavior skills in children, especially in Africa.

Voice for Humanity [VFH]- The Committee supports VFH's programs that utilize state-of-the-art information technology to provide HIV/AIDS education and information to illiterate and semi-literate populations in Africa and elsewhere. The Committee provides $25,000,000 under the GHI account for education and informational projects that utilize state-of-the-art information technology.

WHO, UNAIDS, IAVI, and Microbicides- The Committee recognizes WHO's role in working with governments to combat HIV/AIDS, and expects the Global HIV/AIDS Coordinator to continue to work closely with WHO to support efforts to build the capacity in AIDS-affected countries to effectively utilize resources from the Global Fund. The Committee recommends $30,000,000 for WHO's HIV/AIDS activities in fiscal year 2005.

The Committee provides that not less than $28,000,000 should be made available for a U.S. contribution to UNAIDS, and notes the important role of UNAIDS in coordinating efforts to design national HIV/AIDS plans, expand access to HIV drugs, set standards for vaccine trials, and collect reliable data on the pandemic.

The Committee provides that not less than $28,000,000 should be made available for the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative [IAVI].

The Committee provides that not less than $32,000,000 should be made available to USAID to support research on and development of microbicides as a means of combating HIV/AIDS, of which up to $2,000,000 should be made available to the International Partnership for Microbicides.

Women Leaders Alliance Against AIDS- The Committee supports the HIV/AIDS programs and leadership training activities of the International AIDS Trust that specifically target women.

IMMUNIZATIONS

The Committee supports USAID's immunization programs. The Committee provides $65,000,000 for The Vaccine Fund, which is $5,000,000 above the fiscal year 2004 level.

IODINE DEFICIENCY DISORDERS

Iodine deficiency disorder [IDD] is the leading preventable cause of mental retardation in children. The Committee notes that private funds, raised by Kiwanis International and implemented by UNICEF, are preventing the mental retardation of millions of children through programs to iodize salt. The Committee recommends a total of $3,000,000 for the Kiwanis/UNICEF IDD program, including $2,000,000 from the CSHPF and $1,000,000 from the SEED and FSA accounts.

MATERNAL HEALTH

The Committee is aware that pregnancy-related deaths exceed 600,000 annually, most of which are preventable. The Committee believes that more should be done to address this urgent need, and recommends at least $85,000,000 for maternal health activities and that additional funding be made available specifically to reduce pregnancy-related deaths.

OTHER INFECTIOUS DISEASES

Malaria- Malaria kills approximately 2.7 million people each year, 75 percent of whom are African children under the age of 5 years. The Committee recommends $90,000,000 for USAID's anti-malaria programs, and expects USAID to increase support for the development of a malaria vaccine. The Committee supports the work of Medicines for Malaria Venture to develop new anti-malaria drugs. The Committee also recommends that USAID allocate approximately 10 percent of its funding for malaria programs to vaccine research and development, including $3,000,000 for the Malaria Vaccine Initiative.

Polio Eradication- The Committee notes that despite great progress by governments and Rotary International in eradicating polio (including providing polio immunization to over 2 billion children), public resistance to vaccination in some countries, especially Nigeria, and difficulties in conducting vaccine programs in conflict areas, threaten the success of this campaign. The Committee notes that a resurgence of polio would result in vastly greater costs to society than what is currently needed to eradicate polio, and recommends $32,000,000 for this multilateral effort.

TB- The Committee is aware that TB is the leading killer of people living with HIV/AIDS, and recommends $85,000,000 for this purpose from all bilateral accounts in this Act.

PROGRAMS FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES

The Committee commends the State Department for creating an Advisory Committee on Persons with Disabilities.

The Committee is aware that, although USAID has had a policy on disability for almost a decade, it has not been fully implemented. Accordingly, the Committee provides that proposals seeking funding from USAID shall specify, when relevant, how the proposed program, project or activity will protect the rights and address the needs of people with disabilities. The Committee directs USAID, in consultation with relevant U.S. Government agencies and NGOs, to submit a report not later than 90 days after enactment of this Act on specific recommendations for promoting disability rights and disability access globally.

The Committee supports programs that address the needs of people suffering from physical and mental disabilities. The Committee provides $5,000,000 for the establishment of a Fund for Inclusion, Leadership, and Human Rights of People with Disabilities to be administered by DRL in consultation with USAID. Not to exceed 20 percent of these funds may be made available for a Disability Rights Fellowship Program at the State Department and USAID, and sufficient funds are to be made available to support an international conference on the needs of people with disabilities.

The Committee requires the Secretary of State and USAID Administrator to designate, within their respective agencies, a `Disability Advisor', who will ensure that the needs of people with disabilities are included, where appropriate, in United States policies and programs. The Committee directs the USAID Administrator to seek to ensure that programs, projects and activities administered by USAID comply fully with USAID's `Policy Paper: Disability' issued on September 12, 1997.

The Committee commends USAID's WID Office for its support for Mobility International USA [MIUSA], which provides information and training to assist foreign NGOs in including people with disabilities, especially women and girls, in the development process. The Committee recommends increased funding for WID so it can continue its work to ensure that international development programs and policies are inclusive of women and children with disabilities. The Committee recommends $500,000 for MIUSA in WID funds in fiscal year 2005.

The Committee is aware of the important role that the United States International Council on Disability [USICD] plays in advocating for the rights and needs of people with disabilities in developing countries, and requests USAID to explore ways to strengthen the capacity of USICD and other disability organizations involved in this work that has too often been neglected.

The Committee provides $10,000,000 under the ESF account for wheelchairs for needy persons in developing countries. Of this amount, the Committee directs $5,000,000 be provided to Wheelchairs for the World, and expects these funds to be matched by private donations on a dollar-for-dollar basis.

The Committee supports the efforts of the Center for Mind-Body Medicine to expand the Healing Wounds of War and Terrorism program into Israel, the West Bank and Gaza and recommends that the State Department and USAID consider funding this project.

SURGICAL ASSISTANCE AND MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY

The Committee supports the work of the Surgical Implant Generation Network, which provides training and orthopedic materials to surgeons in some 30 developing countries. The Committee recommends USAID consider providing $1,000,000 to the Network.

The Committee supports the use of enhanced medical technology to improve the training of medical personnel in developing countries and believes that the Haptic medical simulation technology can help accomplish this objective.

VITAMIN A AND OTHER MICRONUTRIENTS

Each year, more than 2.8 million children under 5 years of age die in the developing world from causes related to Vitamin A deficiency. The Committee recommends that at least $30,000,000 be provided for the overall USAID micronutrient program, of which at least $20,000,000 should be for programs relating to Vitamin A deficiency.

DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2004 $1,376,829,000
Budget estimate, 2005 1,329,000,000
Committee recommendation 1,460,000,000

The DA account consists of a wide range of poverty-reduction and long-term development activities including democracy and the rule of law, free market development, agriculture and rural development, urban, environment, and energy, basic education, and micro-credit programs.

PROGRAM ISSUES

AGRICULTURE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS

The Committee supports USAID's renewed emphasis on agriculture, as it has long believed that agricultural development is critical to combating poverty. The Committee encourages a central role for these programs in USAID's future economic development and disaster relief strategies. The Committee also recognizes the important contributions that U.S. universities have made with respect to international agricultural development, particularly training programs. The Committee provides $40,000,000 for plant biotechnology programs.

The Committee continues to believe that dairy development is an important component of U.S. foreign assistance programs and recommends that USAID provide at least $21,770,000, which is equivalent to the fiscal year 2004 funding level. The Committee expects that at least $10,000,000 of this amount should be for new projects and initiatives.

The Committee continues to support the efforts of USAID and the Agriculture Department to improve the quality and nutritional profile of food commodities used in food aid programs. The Committee notes the work of the Food Aid Quality Enhancement Project on this issue and recommends that USAID and other appropriate agencies match private funds raised for this project.

AMERICAN SCHOOLS AND HOSPITALS ABROAD

The Committee continues to recognize the important contributions made to U.S. foreign policy by institutions funded by the ASHA program and provides that not less than $22,000,000 should be made available to support these institutions in fiscal year 2005. The Committee, once again, expects USAID to allocate sufficient sums to administer the ASHA program from funds provided for Operating Expenses, so it will not be necessary to expend any program funds for administrative purposes.

The Committee recognizes the importance of establishing and maintaining relationships with hospitals in developing nations, particularly in countries that have a high prevalence of HIV/AIDS, where hospitals and health care systems are too often unequipped or under-equipped to provide prevention, care, and treatment to infected children and adults. The Committee urges USAID to work with the Global HIV/AIDS Coordinator to solicit and review applications for ASHA funding to increase the number of hospitals and clinics participating in the prevention, care and treatment of adults and children living with HIV/AIDS.

Although the Committee understands that ASHA funds are available for a variety of purposes, such as construction and equipment, libraries, computer technology, curriculum and staff support, and related expenses, the Committee reaffirms its intention that this assistance is not for permanent budget support to ASHA recipients. The Committee encourages ASHA to give priority to institutions which demonstrate a need and a commitment to private fundraising to match government support.

The Committee continues to be impressed with the contributions to United States interests made by several institutions and believes that they warrant consideration for further ASHA support, including Lebanese American University, International College; The Johns Hopkins University's Centers in Nanjing, China and Bologna, Italy; the Tel Aviv University: American Council; the Center for American Studies at Fudan University, Shanghai; the Hadassah Medical Organization; EARTH University's Center for Sustainability and Biodiversity in Cost Rica; the American University of Beirut; the American University of Cairo; Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel; and the Feinberg Graduate School of the Weizmann Institute of Science.

BIRDS OF PREY

Although best known for its efforts to recover the Peregrine Falcon, The Peregrine Fund continues to build a record of protecting birds of prey worldwide. A significant undertaking in the pursuit of preservation is the establishment of The Peregrine Fund's Neotropical Raptor Center in Panama. From this location, The Peregrine Fund would conduct all of its work in the neo-tropics. Like last year, the Committee recommends $500,000 to support this goal, which the Committee understands will be matched by private contributions.

CHILDREN'S BASIC EDUCATION

Educating children in developing countries is fundamental to long term development. The Committee believes that USAID should increase its support for these activities, and provides $335,000,000 for children's basic education in fiscal year 2005. The Committee expects USAID to emphasize programs that expand access and quality of education for girls, enhance community and parental participation in schools, improve teacher training, and build local management capacity.

The Committee is aware of efforts to address the problem of public school fees in poor countries, especially in Africa. These fees are a significant impediment to the attendance of poor children in school, especially girls, who are particularly vulnerable to HIV/AIDS. The Committee believes that USAID should work with UNICEF and others to develop a multilateral, multi-year strategy and funding mechanism to support the elimination of school fees in these countries and to strengthen the capacity of schools to respond to the increased enrollment. The Committee directs USAID to report not later than 180 days after enactment of this Act on the development of such a strategy, including the estimated costs associated with the elimination of school fees. The Committee recommends at least $15,000,000 to eliminate school fees in Africa in fiscal year 2005.

COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH SUPPORT PROGRAMS

The Committee recommends $28,000,000 for USAID's Collaborative Research Support Programs [CRSPS]. Last year, the Statement of Managers accompanying the fiscal year 2004 foreign operations appropriations bill recommended that $2,000,000 be used to establish a CRSP that focused on water security. The Committee requests to be updated on this initiative, and underscores that grants under the CRSP are awarded on a competitive basis.

COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS

The Committee supports microenterprise development programs for the poor, especially women, and recommends that USAID provide at least $195,000,000 (including local currencies derived from U.S. assistance programs) for these activities. The Committee expects USAID to preserve the viability of leading microfinance NGO networks, including faith-based networks, by providing substantial funding to these entities so they may increase the number of people they serve. The majority of microenterprise development resources are to be used to support the direct provision of services to poor microentrepreneurs through these networks. The Committee believes that funding for administrative, procurement, research and other support activities not directly related to the delivery and management of services should be kept to a minimum.

The Committee supports the development, in conjunction with microcredit practitioners, of poverty measurement methods as a means of verifying that at least half these resources are targeted toward the world's poorest people. The Committee directs that USAID report to the Committee no later than 90 days after the enactment of this Act on the status of the development of these methods.

The Committee reiterates its strong support for the International Executive Service Corps [IESC], and expects USAID to provide sufficient funding for IESC activities around the world.

The Committee recognizes the importance of U.S. credit unions and cooperatives in promoting free market principles and access to credit and other banking services in developing countries. In particular, the Committee supports funding for programs in Nicaragua, Sudan, and Afghanistan that may help build civil society organizations, promote development, and address conflicts. The Committee also encourages the Global HIV/AIDS Coordinator to consider how existing rural and urban cooperatives can assist in combatting HIV/AIDS.

The Committee supports funding for Students for Free Enterprise [SIFE], an organization dedicated to teaching the principles of free enterprise to students in developing countries. The Committee expects up to $3,000,000 in MEPI funds to be made available for SIFE programs in the Middle East.

The Committee provides $1,000,000 for the U.S. Telecommunications Training Institute [USTTI]. USTTI is a nonprofit joint venture between the public and private sectors dedicated to providing tuition free communications and broadcast training to professionals from around the world.

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

The Committee supports the activities of the Counterpart Communities program, which generates substantial humanitarian and development assistance to poor communities in the Former Soviet Union, Central Asia and the Middle East. The Committee recommends that USAID and the State Department provide up to $12,000,000 to expand Counterpart Communities programs in those regions, and to Asia, Africa and Latin America.

COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION OF STATES FOR SCHOLARSHIPS

The Committee continues to support the work of the CASS program and expects USAID to fully fund the current CASS agreement. The Committee notes that the CASS program is initiating new activities in Mexico in support of efforts to strengthen U.S.-Mexican relations. Given that the program has a long history in Haiti, the Committee urges USAID to utilize CASS in responding rapidly to that country's crisis.

ENVIRONMENT PROGRAMS

Biodiversity- The Committee provides $175,500,000 in DA for programs and activities which directly protect biologically significant areas, including forests, in developing countries, of which not less than $15,000,000 shall be made available to support a regional strategy for biodiversity conservation in the countries comprising the Amazon basin of South America, including, through organizations such as the Amazon Conservation Team, to improve the capacity of indigenous communities and local law enforcement agencies to protect the biodiversity of indigenous reserves. These funds are in addition to the amount requested for biodiversity conservation activities in the Amazon basin countries in fiscal year 2005.

The Committee commends the efforts of USAID's biodiversity team to collaborate with the Office of Population and Reproductive Health in support of integrated population-health-environment programs and to commit financial resources to address population-related threats to biodiversity.

The Committee reiterates its support for the Parks in Peril program, a partnership with the Nature Conservancy to promote biodiversity conservation in imperiled ecosystems in Latin America and the Caribbean.

The Committee is concerned that the natural habitats of the Irrawaddy Dolphin and Siamese Crocodile in Southeast Asia have become increasingly threatened. The Committee directs USAID to report to the Committee not later than 90 days after enactment of this Act on strategies to help protect these rare species.

The Committee remains concerned with the destruction of habitat of orangutans and again expects USAID to provide at least $2,500,000 for continued support through NGOs, including the Orangutan Foundation and others, for activities to protect the orangutan from extinction. As in the past, the Committee expects these funds to be used to support activities with local communities bordering orangutan habitat in both Borneo and Sumatra, including, if appropriate, to support law enforcement activities, and requests to be consulted prior to the obligation of funds. The Committee urges U.S. Embassy officials in Indonesia to make the prevention of illegal logging, which continues to be a widespread practice that is condoned and encouraged by the Indonesian military, a priority for U.S. policy.

Over the past year, the Committee has become increasingly concerned with the fate of other great apes, including gorillas, chimpanzees, and bonobos, in central Africa. The Committee recognizes that these species will need protection indefinitely and directs USAID, in coordination with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other relevant Federal agencies, to develop a coordinated strategy for supporting efforts to protect great apes and their forest habitat.

The Committee notes that there are several initiatives already under way, such as the Great Apes Conservation Fund, the Congo Basin Forest Partnership, the Pan-African Sanctuary Alliance, and the Great Ape Survival Project [GRASP]. Additional funds are urgently needed to support these efforts. The Committee is aware that Gombe National Park in Tanzania, the site of the world's oldest primate research station, is facing continuing threats from poaching and deforestation. With USAID support, the Jane Goodall Institute is promoting reforestation and better living conditions in communities bordering the park. These programs should be expanded, including to improve basic health and combat HIV/AIDS. The Committee also expects USAID to continue funding efforts to protect the mountain gorilla through such organizations as the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund International and the International Gorilla Conservation Program.

The Committee provides that not less than $17,500,000 should be made available for the Congo Basin Forest Partnership, of which not less than $2,500,000 is for the Great Apes Conservation Fund administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which has a proven track record in this area.

Energy- The Committee provides not less than $180,000,000 to support policies and programs in developing countries that promote energy efficiency, renewable energy, and clean energy technologies, including $15,000,000 for USAID's Office of Energy and Information Technology. The Committee believes that USAID should substantially increase its support for solar energy technology, small scale public-private hydro power projects, and other small scale, renewable energy technologies in areas of the world, such as rural Latin America, Africa, and Pacific island nations, where other sources of energy are either not available or prohibitively expensive.

The Committee expects USAID, the Export-Import Bank, OPIC, and TDA, which are participating in the Clean Energy Technology Exports Initiative, to continue to fully participate in and contribute to this nine-agency effort.

The Committee also urges USAID to increase support for rural electrification infrastructure that uses such energy sources and provides reliable electric service as a key component of a comprehensive economic development strategy.

FAITH-BASED ORGANIZATIONS

The Committee recognizes that faith-based organizations offer USAID and the Global HIV/AIDS Coordinator significant experience and access to local networks in Africa and the Caribbean. The Committee is troubled by reports that USAID's consideration of first-time proposals from these organizations is cumbersome, time consuming, and not user-friendly.

The Committee directs the Global HIV/AIDS Coordinator, in conjunction with USAID, to report no later than 90 days after enactment of this Act on a comprehensive strategy to expand the involvement of faith-based organizations in global HIV/AIDS programs including recommendations for improving USAID's consideration processes for first-time grantees.

The Committee supports the work of Alaska Interfaith Council in the Russian Far East and Lott Carey International.

FERTILIZER DEVELOPMENT

The Committee reiterates its support of the work of the International Fertilizer Development Center [IFDC] and provides that not less than $2,300,000 should be made available for its core grant. The Committee also recommends an additional $1,700,000 to support the research and development activities of IFDC.

GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE

The Committee is aware of the high incidence of sexual and gender-based violence in conflict regions in Africa, and provides $5,000,000 for pilot programs in eastern DROC, Uganda, Burundi, and Liberia to address these issues. The Committee recommends these programs include: training for local law enforcement officials to improve their capacity to prevent and respond to sexual and gender-based violence; support for local crisis centers; technical assistance to the judicial sector; and legal assistance, medical care and other forms of support to the victims of these crimes.

The Committee remains concerned with the practice of female genital cutting and child marriage and directs USAID, in consultation with the State Department, to submit a report not later than 90 days after enactment of this Act describing current efforts and strategies by the United States Government to more effectively address these issues.

INTERNATIONAL COFFEE CRISIS

The Committee continues to support U.S. membership in the International Coffee Organization [ICO], and understands that while membership in the ICO will not solve the international coffee crisis, the ICO can be an effective mechanism for bringing together concerned parties to seek solutions to this critical issue.

The Committee urges the State Department to move expeditiously to resolve the outstanding issues concerning U.S. membership, as this process has been ongoing for a considerable amount of time. The Committee directs the Secretary of State to report on the status of U.S. membership not later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this Act.

The Committee again urges USAID to increase funding for alternative development programs for Vietnamese coffee farmers.

PATRICK LEAHY WAR VICTIMS FUND

The Committee continues to support the Leahy War Victims Fund, which, since 1989, has provided essential orthopedic and related medical, surgical, and rehabilitation assistance for persons who are disabled as a result of armed conflict. In addition to enabling amputees and other people with disabilities to regain mobility, the Committee supports USAID's efforts to increase their accessibility to mainstream educational, recreational and economic opportunities. The Committee expects USAID to provide not less than $14,000,000 for this program in fiscal year 2005.

The Committee continues to encourage the Leahy War Victims Fund to increase its support for initiatives in conflict-affected countries that will lead to appropriate disability laws and policies, and improvements in and the expansion of appropriate services and programs that are needed by people with physical disabilities.

PROPERTY RIGHTS

The Committee again recognizes the work of the International Real Property Foundation [IRPF] to create private real estate markets and promote property rights abroad. The Committee provides not less than $2,000,000 for IRPF.

SPORTS PROGRAMS

The Committee supports programs to enhance child health and development and to strengthen communities through sports programs. The Committee notes, in particular, the work of Right to Play and Special Olympics. The Committee directs USAID and the State Department to provide up to $5,000,000 to Right to Play.

The Committee directs USAID to submit a report not later than 90 days after enactment of this Act, evaluating the health, social and economic benefits resulting from these programs.

TOXIC AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS DISPOSAL

The Committee supports an initiative by the World Bank and the FAO to dispose of dangerous pesticides and other toxic agricultural chemicals in African countries. These chemicals pose serious risks to human health and the environment, and are potential lethal weapons for terrorists. The Committee believes that this initiative, to be sustainable, should include assistance to strengthen the capacity of local governments to collect accurate data about these risks and conduct effective monitoring and evaluation, and notes the work of Stone Environmental in Mali. The Committee urges USAID to work with the World Bank in this effort.

TRADE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS

The Committee supports programs targeted toward increasing United States exports and believes that USAID should coordinate its activities with other relevant United States Government agencies. The Committee supports the work of the Idea Village International to build trade capacity in the developing world.

UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS

The Committee provides $40,000,000 for international development programs conducted by colleges and universities from the CSHPF, DA, ESF, SEED, and FSA accounts through the direction and authority of the Office of the Higher Education Community Liaison in USAID's Bureau for Economic Growth, Agriculture, and Trade. These funds are in addition to funding otherwise made available for these purposes.

The Committee has, once again, received a large number of requests to fund specific activities at or through American institutions of higher education. The Committee strongly supports activities that advance international development and United States foreign policy goals. The Committee has reviewed the concepts proposed for funding, and recommends that USAID and/or the State Department (as appropriate for the proposed project) actively consider proposals submitted by the following organizations.

Unless a proposal demonstrates a unique, innovative, or proprietary capability, or demonstrates special considerations that justify limited or non-competitive treatment, the Committee expects that competitive procedures will be applied with regard to the proposals on the list that follows. The Committee also expects USAID to give priority to proposals that have technical merit, realistic budgets, matching contributions, and achievable objectives.

No later than 60 days after the submission of the report required by section 653(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act, USAID should submit a report to the Committee on the status of each activity identified below. Such a report should include: (1) the status of the funding proposal by the organization associated with each activity; (2) the degree to which the proposal is consistent with and would advance international development and United States foreign policy goals for the country or region in which the activity would take place; (3) the degree to which matching or other funds would be provided by the organization to complement the Federal contribution; (4) to the extent known at the time, any decision by USAID or the State Department on funding the activity, including the funding level; and (5) any other relevant information deemed important by USAID or the State Department. The Committee also expects to receive a second report on the status of these proposals no later than July 1, 2005.

With the foregoing in mind, the Committee recommends the following proposals for USAID and the State Department's active consideration:

Alliant International University- A collaborative project with the United States International University-Kenya to transfer technology skills to Kenyan businesses.

Austin Peay State University.--A proposal to enhance the international programs and activities of the Institute on Global Security Studies.

Barry University.--A program to establish academic and training centers to advance economic, social, and other opportunities for women in the developing world.

Central State University- A proposal, in conjunction with Wilberforce University and the National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education, to implement a range of programs, including a virtual university consortium and an Institute for Emerging Democracies.

Clemson University- A proposal to enhance sustainable environmental and agricultural programs and organic production (particularly tropical medicinal plants) in Dominica.

Cleveland State University- A proposal to enhance municipal management and health care administration in Croatia and other Central European nations.

College of William and Mary- A proposal to enhance dialogue and understanding of the Middle East through the Middle Eastern Studies Program to Educate Global Leaders.

Columbia University- A program to enhance international environmental studies through the Earth Institute.

Dartmouth College- A joint proposal with the American International Health Alliance to continue a microsystem methodology program in Kosovo.

DePaul University College of Law- A proposal to strengthen criminal justice systems and enhance the protection of human rights in the Arab world.

DePaul University College of Law- A proposal to provide human rights training to junior and mid-level diplomats from the Middle East, Persian Gulf, and North Africa.

DePaul University College of Law- A proposal relating to cultural heritage preservation in Afghanistan.

EARTH University.--A proposal to support EARTH University's Center for Tropical Sustainability and Biodiversity to foster sustainable agriculture, medicines, and preservation of natural resources.

East Tennessee State University.--A proposal to expand the global health programs of the International Center for Rural Health, including among Kurdish refugees.

Eastern Kentucky University- A proposal for programs in Russia associated with an International Justice and Safety Institute.

George Mason University- A proposal to enhance programs at the Center for World Religions, Diplomacy and Conflict Resolution.

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.--A proposal for programs associated with a Center for Public Health and Human Rights, including in Burma, Russia, Tajikistan, China, and Thailand.

Kirkwood Community College- A proposal to bring vocational training to countries in Africa and Asia through a Visual Learning Center.

La Roche College- A proposal to expand programs to educate young people from conflict, post-conflict, and developing regions of the world.

Louisiana State University- A proposal to expand trade and commerce through commercial and civil law programs with several Latin American countries.

Louisiana State University- A proposal to provide training to local government officials from Central and Eastern Europe on measuring and assessing public opinion.

Montana State University- A proposal to facilitate international business exchange programs.

Montana State University- A proposal to expand international business programs and curricula.

Montana State University- A proposal to enhance activities associated with the International Telecommunications Training Institute.

Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey.--A proposal, in conjunction with Thomas Edison State College and the SaS Institute, to establish a pilot management training program for the training of local leaders in the Middle East and South Asia.

South Dakota School of Mines and Technology- A proposal, in conjunction with the Mongolian Technology Institute, to provide technology education, management, and training in Mongolia.

South Dakota State University- A proposal, in conjunction with the University of Arizona, to enhance research, exchanges and education with Russian, Chinese, and Central Asian governments and NGOs on agricultural development.

Southern Methodist University- A proposal for legal training for foreign government officials and NGO representatives.

Suffolk University- A proposal to establish a Business, Science, and Technology Center to enhance research in Senegal.

Temple University- A proposal to expand judicial training programs in the People's Republic of China.

Texas A&M University- A proposal to expand aflatoxin research, particularly with respect to its effects on animal and human health worldwide.

Tulane University- A collaborative partnership with Xavier University and the West African Health Organization to prevent and treat HIV/AIDS in the security forces of Economic Community of West African States member countries.

University of Alaska- A program with Alaska Pacific University and the North Slope Borough and Northwest Arctic Borough to provide training and technical assistance to strengthen Chukotka's economy, develop market-driven systems and improve social conditions, particularly for indigenous people in the region.

University of Arizona- A proposal to support the activities of the International Arid Lands Consortium.

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences- A collaborative project with the American International Health Alliance to improve health care delivery in Russia, Latvia, and Moldova.

University of Georgia- A proposal by the Carl Vinson Institute of Government to create a Center for Rural Economic Development in Croatia.

University of Georgia- A proposal to reduce threats posed by weapons of mass destruction at the Center for International Trade and Security.

University of Hawaii School of Law- A proposal to create a Remedy, Reconciliation, and Reconstruction Center.

University of Hawaii School of Law- A proposal to create a Pacific Asian Judicial Training Institute.

University of Hawaii School of Law- A proposal to create a Center for Indigenous Rights.

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign- A proposal to support planning activities associated with the creation of a Trans-Atlantic Commission on Ethnicity, Race, Immigration, and Citizenship.

University of Kansas- A collaborative effort with the Government of Azerbaijan and Azeri educational institutions to provide business and financial training.

University of Kentucky- A program relating to health education in Romania.

University of Kentucky- A proposal for coal mine safety programs in the former Soviet Union.

University of Kentucky- A proposal, in conjunction with three Indonesian universities, to further economic development opportunities in Indonesia.

University of Louisville- A project relating to drinking water systems management and maintenance in the Republic of Georgia.

University of Louisville- A collaborative project with several universities to assist Caribbean countries in the identification and development of nutraceuticals from native plant materials.

University of Louisville- A program to work with impoverished communities in South Africa.

University of Louisville- A proposal to establish a Center for Democracy, Human Rights and Security.

University of Massachusetts, Boston- A proposal concerning the William Joiner Fellowships in War and Social Consequences.

University of Miami- A proposal for the Cuba Transition Project to conduct research to prepare for and support Cuba's transition to democracy.

University of Minnesota- A proposal to expand the international Public Achievement program at the Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs.

University of Missouri- A proposal regarding comparative genomics of grain legumes in Vietnam.

University of Montana- A proposal for a demonstration rule of law and legal training project in Kyrgyzstan.

University of Nebraska, Omaha- A proposal to support the Community-Based, Vocational-Education Project through the Center for Afghanistan Studies.

University of Nevada- A proposal to expand the activities of the Center for International Water Security to help alleviate the world's water supply problems.

University of Nevada, Las Vegas- A proposal, in conjunction with the North American Network of Cities of Asylum, to help protect international dissident writers.

University of Northern Iowa- A proposal to develop an Alliance for International Business Development and Education to enhance global business expertise with respect to China.

University of South Alabama- A proposal to enhance the Birth Defects Monitoring Program in Ukraine, which will allow additional monitoring of environmentally linked birth defects.

University of Washington- A proposal to enhance understanding with the Middle East region through the Middle East Information Portal.

Utah State University- An ongoing project to assemble a multinational water management organization in the Middle East.

Utah State University- A proposal to develop and implement advanced hydrological data collection and analysis techniques in arid regions throughout the world.

Vermont Law School- A proposal to strengthen China's legal system and governance, particularly in the area of environmental law, through expanding a partnership between Vermont Law School and Sun Yat-sen University, involving exchanges, training of Chinese law faculty, and the creation of the first environmental law clinic in China.

Virginia Commonwealth University- A proposal, in collaboration with South African universities, for HIV/AIDS programs.

Western Kentucky University- A proposal for the continued funding of an international journalist training program.

Western Kentucky University- A project to develop and promote safe coal practices and karst water resources in China.

VICTIMS OF TORTURE

The Committee includes a new general provision to address the acute need for assistance for victims of torture, rape, and other cruel, inhuman, and degrading treatment. The Committee notes that torture is practiced in over 60 countries and victims often suffer permanent physical and psychological disabilities. The Committee provides $15,000,000 for these programs from the DA and ESF accounts, including for centers for victims of torture that provide services consistent with the goals of the Torture Victims Relief Reauthorization Act of 1999.

WATER CONSERVATION

The Committee is aware that many parts of the world do not have access to reliable sources of drinking water, forcing people to spend large amounts of time in search of clean water to meet their basic needs. With a small amount of funding and equipment, a local well can be drilled. The Committee provides $100,000,000 for these efforts, and directs USAID to report no later than 90 days after enactment of this Act on funding and implementation of its water projects, including the number and location of wells drilled, and the cost per well.

The Committee reiterates its support for the work of Water Missions International [WMI], a faith-based engineering nonprofit organization that provides safe and sustainable water systems for developing countries and disaster areas, and provides $2,000,000 for WMI to develop clean water treatment projects in developing countries.

WOMEN IN DEVELOPMENT

The Committee recommends $15,000,000 in fiscal year 2005 for USAID's WID Office and expects the USAID Administrator to strengthen the WID Office. The Office continues to integrate gender perspectives into USAID's programs and policies, and provide technical support, research and implementation of initiatives focused on women's economic status and legal rights, and girls' education.

The Committee supports the mission of Women's Campaign International [WCI], which works to enhance the status of women through media, leadership, business, organizational, and public-service training in developing countries. The Committee recommends at least $2,500,000 for WCI in fiscal year 2005.

The Committee supports funding for Girls International Forum, an organization that encourages the involvement of girls in international efforts to improve the lives of girls and women. The Committee also notes the work of the Women's Environment and Development Organization.

COUNTRY ISSUES

AFGHANISTAN

The Committee endorses the budget request of $929,250,000 for assistance for Afghanistan and provides that not less than $504,450,000 shall be made available for humanitarian and reconstruction assistance.

The Committee highlights the importance of counternarcotics efforts in Afghanistan, and encourages international donors, especially from Europe where most Afghan heroin is sold, to provide sufficient funding and border control resources to address this serious threat. In addition, the Committee recommends that Afghan President Hamid Karzai swiftly crack down on government officials and others involved in the illegal drug trade. The Committee provides $1,500,000 under the INCLE account for the International Foundation of Hope's Horticultural Development Program in Nangarhar Province.

The Committee supports the establishment of a professional and disciplined Afghan National Army [ANA]. The Committee provides that funds available for assistance for the ANA should be made available if members of the Army have been vetted for any involvement in terrorism, human rights violations, drug trafficking, and other serious criminal activity. The Committee believes that information should be sought from a wide range of sources including human rights organizations.

The Committee provides $50,000,000 to support programs to directly address the needs of Afghan women and girls. The Committee believes that a central goal of United States assistance for Afghanistan should be to strengthen and support Afghan women's organizations (many of them small and located outside of major urban areas) that have established themselves as effective advocates for women's rights and as trusted providers of assistance. Not less than $15,000,000 of these funds are to be made available through small grants to Afghan women's NGOs.

In addition to these programs, USAID should make a concerted effort to ensure that gender issues are fully addressed in all sector programs, especially health, education, political participation, and women's economic empowerment. The Committee requests USAID to consult with the Committee on an effective mechanism for the expeditious disbursement of funds to a wide range of Afghan NGOs. As in past years, the Committee requests that USAID systematically track all direct grants and sub-grants to local NGOs and make this information available to the Committees and other interested parties.

The Committee also provides $2,000,000 for reforestation activities, $2,000,000 for the Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission and other Afghan human rights organizations, and $2,000,000 for assistance for Afghan communities and families that have suffered losses as a result of military operations.

BURMA

The Committee condemns and deplores the continued assault on democracy in Burma and provides $15,000,000 for a range of activities to support the struggle for freedom in that country. The Committee directs that funds for cross-border humanitarian activities in Thailand will not be provided to any U.N. agency or any organization or group affiliated with the SPDC.

The Committee calls upon the United Nations, EU and regional neighbors to increase pressure on the SPDC to enter into a meaningful reconciliation process with the NLD and ethnic minorities. The Committee notes the NLD specifically requested U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan to `take this matter to the Security Council', and strongly endorses such action.

The Committee believes that under current circumstances, Burma's anticipated chairmanship of ASEAN in 2006 would undermine the legitimacy of that Association and would be a contradiction of the ASEAN Declaration to secure `the blessings of peace, freedom and prosperity' for Southeast Asian peoples.

The Committee includes a new provision that prohibits assistance in this Act to the central government of any country that is a major provider of weapons or other defense-related equipment to the SPDC, as determined by the Secretary of State, in consultation with the Secretary of Defense.

CAMBODIA

With few exceptions, the Committee again restricts assistance to the central Government of Cambodia and remains deeply concerned that corruption and the absence of the rule of law undermines the pace and direction of development activities. The Committee regrets that international donors, particularly the World Bank, have failed to ensure the financial integrity of programs and activities.

The Committee again prohibits funding to any Khmer Rouge tribunal established by the Government of Cambodia, and directs the State Department to report within 90 days of enactment of this Act on the activities, if any, of the People's Republic of China to delay or derail such a tribunal.

The Committee supports the Documentation Center of Cambodia, and expects not less than $500,000 to be made available under the ESF account for its programs and activities. The Committee provides authority for the establishment of an endowment for the Center.

The Committee also provides authority for an endowment for an American nongovernmental organization to support rehabilitation programs in Cambodia for persons with physical disabilities.

The Committee again expects ESF to be provided to support Global Witness' activities to protect Cambodia's forests.

CHINA

The Committee provides $35,000,000 under the ESF account for activities to support democracy, human rights, and the rule of law in the People's Republic of China and Hong Kong. Of these funds, $15,000,000 is made available for DRL, $10,000,000 is for the NED, and $10,000,000 is for American educational institutions for programs and activities relating to the environment, democracy and the rule of law in the People's Republic of China, including the Vermont Law School and the University of Louisville.

The Committee again provides authority to conduct programs in Taiwan, on a cost matching basis, that further political and legal reforms.

The Committee supports the aspirations of the people of Hong Kong for self determination and free and fair elections, and deplores and condemns reports of threats and intimidation against Hong Kong journalists and politicians. The Committee supports programs that safeguard political and economic freedoms in Hong Kong.

CYPRUS

The Committee provides $13,500,000 from the ESF account for Cyprus to be used for scholarships, bicommunal projects, and measures aimed at reunification of the island and designed to reduce tensions and promote peace and cooperation between the two communities on Cyprus.

The Committee notes with disappointment the lack of consultation prior to the State Department's pledging of funds at the Cyprus donor conference earlier this year. The Committee directs that it be consulted prior to the announcement of pledges at international donor conferences.

DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO

The Committee remains concerned with ongoing insecurity, political instability, and human rights abuses in DROC, including gender-based violence against women. The Committee deplores and condemns the rape, assault, and torture of women in DROC.

The Committee supports an assistance strategy for DROC that includes: increased security and governance through the establishment of professional military and police forces; greater accountability through the development of an independent judiciary; initiation of reconciliation programs, especially in eastern DROC; and medical and psychological care to the victims of atrocities in DROC, particularly rape.

The Committee commends the work of O Kapi Radio to provide news and information to the people of DROC where communications and transportation is severely limited. The Committee expects USAID and the State Department to provide $300,000 to help repair a shortwave antenna in order to improve O Kapi Radio's broadcast range in that country.

DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF TIMOR-LESTE

The Committee provides $22,000,000 in ESF assistance for East Timor, which is $8,500,000 above the budget request. The Committee continues to follow with interest negotiations between East Timor and Australia over petroleum reserves, and again encourages all parties to negotiate in good faith in accordance with international legal principles.

ETHIOPIA

The Committee notes with concern reports of ethnic violence in southwestern Ethiopia, in particular allegations of atrocities committed by the Ethiopian military against Anuak civilians. While the Committee recognizes and appreciates the efforts of the Government of Ethiopia to combat international terrorism, these reported cases of human rights violations must be credibly investigated and prosecuted. In addition to facilitating the return of refugees and IDPs, the Government of Ethiopia should allow international human rights and humanitarian organizations access to this area, and work to restore property rights and economic opportunities to those returning to the region. Failure to do so will result in a reevaluation of military assistance to Ethiopia.

The Committee directs the State Department to report within 180 days after the enactment of this Act on the extent of human rights abuses committed in southwestern Ethiopia, efforts by the Government of Ethiopia to investigate and bring to justice the perpetrators of these abuses and measures taken by the State Department and other relevant U.S. Government agencies to provide humanitarian assistance to the region and to vet assistance to the Ethiopian military, consistent with the Leahy Law. The report shall also include an assessment concerning the credibility of the efforts of the Government of Ethiopia on this issue.

HAITI

The Committee endorses the budget request for Haiti from the FMF, IMET, and Peace Corps accounts, and provides $10,000,000 in INCLE funds, $20,000,000 in CSHPF, $25,000,000 in DA, and $25,000,000 in ESF. The total amount of funds available for Haiti in this Act is $82,524,000.

The Committee notes the recent donors conference which resulted in substantial pledges for assistance for Haiti, and expects the State Department to identify specific, achievable benchmarks for the disbursements of assistance, particularly with respect to economic, political and judicial reforms.

The Committee directs the Secretary of State to submit a report within 90 days after enactment of this Act on a multiyear assistance strategy for Haiti. The Committee remains concerned with the deteriorating security situation in Haiti caused by former military and police personnel and other armed groups, and recommends that the U.N. Stabilization Mission in Haiti take more assertive steps to counter the illegal activities of these groups. The Committee believes that priority for U.S. assistance funds should be given to restoring security, rebuilding a professional police force, strengthening the rule of law, combating HIV/AIDS and other health crises, combating poverty, preparing for elections, and protecting Haiti's environment. The Committee provides $2,000,000 for the Hillside Agriculture Production program.

The Committee recognizes that public health begins at the community level, and provides $2,000,000 to Zanmi Lasante for public health programs (including HIV/AIDS, TB, and child survival) in additional sites in the Central Plateau, Hinche, and Thomassique. The Committee expects USAID to consider a proposal by Konbit Sante in a fair and timely manner.

The Committee's longstanding concerns with deforestation in Haiti were reinforced with the May 2004 floods and mudslides which caused widespread death and destruction. The Committee requires the USAID Administrator to consult with Haitian officials and local NGOs and communities, and appropriate international organizations to devise a reforestation strategy for areas in Haiti that are vulnerable to erosion which pose significant danger to human health and safety. The USAID Administrator is to submit a report on such a strategy, including funding requirements.

INDONESIA

The Committee endorses the budget request for Indonesia but believes that significant additional resources are required to further political, economic, and social reforms and mitigate the ability of Islamic extremists to recruit terrorists and operate throughout the country.

The Committee notes that, while imperfect, recent elections in Indonesia underscore the compatibility of Islam and democracy and encourages USAID and the State Department to utilize this experience, where appropriate, in programs and activities in the Middle East and South Asia.

The Committee provides $3,000,000 to Internews to continue media programs in Indonesia and cautions USAID against prematurely terminating free and independent media activities in that country. The Committee deplores the Government of Indonesia's decision to expel representatives from the International Crisis Group from Jakarta and is concerned that other international NGOs working to strengthen democracy, human rights, and the rule of law may be similarly targeted by the Indonesian Government.

The Committee again restricts FMF assistance and exports of lethal defense articles to Indonesia, and provides IMET assistance if the Secretary of State determines that the Indonesian Government and Armed Forces are cooperating with the Federal Bureau of Investigation's investigation into the August 31, 2002 murders of American and Indonesian citizens in Timika. The Committee does not support the use of ESF for police training and related activities in Indonesia, and directs the State Department to use INCLE funds for such purposes.

The Committee shares the State Department's dismay and disappointment with the acquittal of Indonesian military officers in connection with the 1999 atrocities in East Timor and the performance and record of the ad hoc tribunal.

The Committee is alarmed by reports that the Indonesian military is preventing IDPs in Aceh from receiving assistance from humanitarian relief organizations. The Committee expects the State Department to use its influence with the Government of Indonesia to ensure that international relief, media and human rights organizations have unimpeded access to this area, and urges the Government of Indonesia to use maximum restraint in military operations in Aceh to safeguard the lives of innocent civilians.

IRAN

The Committee supports the efforts of those in Iran seeking political and economic freedom and provides not less than $3,000,000 for programs and activities that advance democracy and human rights in that country.

The Committee remains concerned with reports of Iranian interference in the reconstruction of Iraq and with efforts by Iran to develop nuclear capabilities.

KENYA

The Committee notes that the end of the Moi era in Kenya was widely expected to lead to significant political and economic progress, including an end to rampant corruption. However, while some progress has been made, the Committee is deeply concerned with continuing reports of corruption which undermines Kenya's development. Accordingly, the Committee provides $10,000,000 in ESF for Kenya, an increase of $2,000,000 above the budget request. These additional funds are to be used to support programs to improve governance and combat corruption.

The Committee supports the work of the Greenbelt Movement, an indigenous NGO that focuses on environmental conservation and economic development. The Committee recommends not less than $250,000 for the Greenbelt Movement to support reforestation in Kenya's mountainous areas, which are a key source of water for irrigation and drinking.

LAOS

The Committee notes the success of USAID's health care programs in Laos, which are conducted through NGOs, and expects a total of $2,000,000 to be provided for assistance for Laos from the CSHPF and DA accounts. The Committee again notes the abysmal human rights record of the Government of Laos.

LEBANON

The Committee provides $35,000,000 for assistance for Lebanon, of which not less than $4,000,000 should be made available to American educational institutions for scholarships and direct support.

The Committee is deeply disappointed that past efforts to secure the return of American children abducted to Lebanon and Syria have been unsuccessful. The Committee is aware of cases in which the Lebanese Government has failed to enforce the orders of the Lebanese civil courts. These unresolved cases will continue to be an obstacle to closer relations between the United States and the Lebanese and Syrian governments.

LIBERIA

The Committee commends the State Department and USAID for their work in support of reconstruction and reconciliation in Liberia and recognizes that numerous development challenges remain throughout that country. The Committee endorses the budget request for ESF, INL, and CSHPF for Liberia but believes that additional DA resources are necessary to address drug addiction among former combatants, rebuild infrastructure, and support an independent monitor of Liberia's timber resources. The Committee, therefore, provides an additional $8,000,000 in DA to respond to these critical needs, and an additional $30,000,000 in FMF assistance to continue to rebuild the Liberian armed forces. The Committee expects funds for these purposes to be included in the fiscal year 2006 budget request.

The Committee is pleased that the Special Court for Sierra Leone [SCSL] has commenced trials of persons charged with committing atrocities during Sierra Leone's civil war and commends the recent decision of the SCSL to reject the head of state immunity motion filed by Charles Taylor. The Committee believes that Taylor should answer the charges brought against him by the SCSL and encourages the State Department to work with the Governments of Liberia and Sierra Leone to secure the transfer of Taylor to the SCSL from Nigeria. The Committee is disappointed that fewer than half of the members of the Liberian Assembly voted on a resolution urging the Government of Nigeria to transfer Taylor to the SCSL. The Committee urges the Government of Liberia to reconsider this resolution in a timely manner and with the full Liberian Assembly's participation.

MONGOLIA

The Committee endorses the budget request for Mongolia, and appreciates that country's contributions to reconstruction efforts in Iraq. The Committee continues to support political, economic and legal reforms in Mongolia.

NEPAL

The Committee remains concerned with the Maoist insurgency in Nepal, including the recent upsurge in Maoist violence across the country, and reports of human rights abuses committed by the rebels and Nepalese government security forces. The Committee recommends not less than $100,000 be provided for the Nepalese Human Rights Commission to strengthen its capacity to investigate human rights violations, and requests the State Department to consult with the Committee on the application of the Leahy Law in Nepal, progress in investigating and punishing human rights abuses, and preparations for free and fair elections in that country.

NICARAGUA AND GUATEMALA

The Committee commends the efforts of the Governments of Nicaragua and Guatemala to combat corruption. Strict new laws are being written and former high ranking officials are being charged and prosecuted, which are important steps toward ending the long legacy of impunity in those countries. Efforts are also being undertaken to reform state institutions, through modernization of the legal process and the use of new information technologies, to increase accountability and transparency of government actions. However, difficult obstacles remain. To support these efforts the Committee provides additional funding above the budget request for both countries.

The Committee recommends not less than $250,000 for the Procuraduria de la Republica in Nicaragua to strengthen its capacity to conduct anti-corruption activities.

The Committee recommends not less than $250,000 for the Fiscalia de Anti-corruption in Guatemala to strengthen its capacity to conduct anti-corruption activities.

The Committee recognizes the important work of the Fabretto Children's Foundation in Nicaragua, which provides opportunities for children in Nicaragua to escape poverty. The Committee recommends that not less than $1,500,000 should be made available for the Foundation.

The Committee urges USAID to provide up to $250,000 to the Center for International Rehabilitation to design and field-test a model for early screening and intervention for children with developmental disabilities in Nicaragua that can be replicated in other developing nations.

The Committee encourages USAID to support the Polus Center Mobility and Social Access project in Leon, Nicaragua to assist individuals who have lost limbs due to acts of war, landmines or disease.

NORTH KOREA

The Committee provides that funding under the MRA account should be made available to international organizations for assistance for refugees from North Korea.

PAKISTAN

The Committee endorses the request of $700,050,000 for assistance for Pakistan, of which $300,000,000 is provided through the ESF account and $300,000,000 through the FMF account. Debt relief authority is provided for Pakistan for up to $200,000,000 from ESF funds.

While the Committee appreciates Pakistan's significant contributions to the ongoing global war against international terrorism, it remains concerned with the slow pace of democratic development of that country.

The Committee provides that not less than $10,000,000 should be made available to support programs conducted by indigenous organizations that seek to further education, health, employment and other opportunities for the people of Pakistan. Of this amount, up to $4,000,000 should be made available to the Pakistan Human Development Fund and $1,000,000 for the Amanut Society. The Committee encourages USAID to continue to work with these groups to ensure the maximum effectiveness of programs.

RWANDA

The Committee continues to support assistance for Rwanda to reduce poverty, combat HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other infectious diseases, promote reconciliation and democracy, punish those responsible for genocide, and conserve wildlife habitat. The Committee is concerned that Interahamwe forces who were involved in the 1994 genocide continue to threaten Rwanda from sanctuaries in DROC, and urges increased international efforts to apprehend the leaders of these forces for prosecution before the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and to facilitate the return of Rwandan refugees. The Committee is concerned with reports that the Rwandan military is supporting Congolese rebels and that forested areas abutting the Virunga National Park, a World Heritage site, are being destroyed by migrants. The Committee calls upon the Governments of Rwanda, Uganda, and DROC to constructively work together and with international organizations, including the United Nations, to resolve this crisis. The Committee believes that additional U.N. forces are needed in the area.

The Committee supports the Fiber and Craft Entrepreneurial Development Center's programs to provide knitting machines to refugees and needy women in Rwanda and to help them market their products.

SIERRA LEONE

The Committee supports the budget request for Sierra Leone, including $5,000,000 under the ESF account. The Committee expects USAID to provide not less than $7,000,000 in DA for Sierra Leone, a portion of which should be targeted toward democracy and political party development programs. The Committee notes the urgent need for economic opportunities for demobilized soldiers in that country and urges USAID to direct additional resources for this purpose.

SOMALIA

The Committee is concerned that the budget request for assistance for Somalia under the DA account is only $986,000. The Committee requests USAID and the State Department to take a more active role to assist local efforts to promote peace and development in that country and recommends that not less than $5,000,000 in DA be provided to support secular education and strengthen civil society, particularly in Somaliland and Puntland.

SUDAN

The Committee provides more than $615,000,000 for assistance for Darfur, Sudan and the region, including $394,000,000 from the State Department's anticipated fiscal year 2005 allocation, $150,000,000 transferred from funds previously appropriated for assistance for Iraq in Public Law 108-106 to the IDFA account, and additional assistance from the MRA and ERMA accounts. The Committee recognizes that funding levels for Sudan are subject to change due to the unstable situation in Darfur. The Committee requests the State Department to consult within 30 days after enactment of this Act on the total amount of funding for Darfur, Sudan and the region. The Committee directs that if a budget request for the funds provided in this provision is not submitted to Congress, the State Department should submit a report to the Committee not later than 45 days after enactment of this Act describing the reasons why this authority was not utilized

The Committee deplores the policies of the Government of Sudan which have resulted in the systematic destruction of villages, the deaths of tens of thousands of people, the displacement of more than 1 million people in Darfur, and impeded the delivery of humanitarian assistance to the region.

The Committee supports the use of assistance provided under the ESF account for aid to the National Democratic Alliance of Sudan to strengthen its ability to protect civilians from attacks, slave raids, and aerial bombardment by the Sudanese Government forces and its militia allies. The Committee notes that such aid includes non-lethal, non-food aid such as blankets, medicine, fuel, mobile clinics, water drilling equipment, communications equipment to notify civilians of aerial bombardment, non-military vehicles, tents, and shoes.

THAILAND

The Committee notes with concern increased acts of terrorism in Thailand and the initial ineffective response of the Thai Government to violence in Southern Thailand.

The Committee believes that the Thai Government's continued crack down on Burmese democracy activists, forced deportations of Burmese, and closure of democracy promotion conferences in Thailand are indications of the erosion of liberty in Thailand. The Committee provides $4,000,000 to promote democracy and human rights and $1,000,000 to promote media freedom, in Thailand. The Committee recommends a portion of these funds to be targeted to programs and activities in Southern Thailand. With the exception of democracy and human rights programs, the Committee conditions assistance to the central government of Thailand on a determination by the Secretary of State that Thailand: (1) supports the advancement of democracy in Burma; (2) is not hampering the delivery of assistance to people in Thailand who have fled Burma; and (3) is not forcibly repatriating Burmese.

TIBET

The Committee continues its strong support of activities which preserve cultural traditions and promote sustainable development and environmental conservation in Tibetan communities in the Tibetan Autonomous Region and in other Tibetan communities in China. The Committee provides $4,000,000 in ESF for such programs. The Committee also provides $250,000 in ESF to the NED for programs relating to Tibet.

The Committee directs that $2,000,000 should be provided to The Bridge Fund and that the balance of funds be made available on a fully competitive basis.

The Committee strongly encourages the State Department's Special Coordinator for Tibetan Issues to convene coordinating conferences on Tibet for appropriate United States Government agencies and NGOs.

UGANDA

The Committee remains concerned that the 18-year conflict between the Government of Uganda and the Lord's Resistance Army [LRA] has severely undermined that country's development and compromised stability in the region. The Committee is concerned with the lack of protection afforded to the `night commuters' by the Government of Uganda and the international community, and believes that the State Department and USAID should provide additional resources--above that which is currently being provided--to enhance protective measures for these vulnerable children. The Committee expects funds from IDFA, MRA and ERMA to be utilized to address this issue.

The Committee expects the State Department to encourage the United Nations to ensure that a high profile coordinator for Uganda is appointed to facilitate humanitarian access and protection for at-risk populations, and to press Ugandan President Museveni to permit international human rights monitors to protect civilians and investigate allegations of abuses by the LRA and the Ugandan military. The State Department should also urge the Government of Uganda to make protection of civilians a higher priority.

Although no funding was included in the budget request, the Committee recommends $2,000,000 in FMF for non-lethal military equipment for Uganda, contingent on the government making significant improvements in the protection of human rights, professionalization of the Ugandan armed forces, and the prevention of recruitment of children into armed militias and demobilization of existing militias.

The Committee expects the State Department to apply the Leahy Law when providing assistance to Ugandan security force units, and, should security conditions permit, the Committee supports a significant increase in assistance to people who have been affected by the conflict.

ZIMBABWE

The Committee continues to be concerned by the economic and political crisis in Zimbabwe and condemns the policies of the Mugabe regime, particularly the actions of youth militias which have engaged in torture and other human rights abuses. The Committee strongly endorses USAID's democracy and governance programs in Zimbabwe, and includes a provision in the bill restricting U.S. support for assistance to that country from international financial institutions.

INTERNATIONAL DISASTER AND FAMINE ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2004 $253,993,000
Emergency supplemental 110,000,000
Budget estimate, 2005 385,500,000
Committee recommendation 385,500,000

The Committee provides $385,500,000 for IDFA programs, which is equal to the budget request.

TRANSITION INITIATIVES

Appropriations, 2004 $54,676,000
Budget estimate, 2005 62,800,000
Committee recommendation 50,000,000

USAID's OTI provides assistance to bridge the gap between emergency relief and long-term development programs. The Committee reiterates its support for OTI's programs and activities, and regrets that budget constraints prevented the Committee from fully funding the budget request.

DEVELOPMENT CREDIT AUTHORITY

(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

PROGRAM ACCOUNT

(BY TRANSFER)

Appropriations, 2004 ($21,000,000)
Budget estimate, 2005 (21,000,000)
Committee recommendation (21,000,000)

OPERATING EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2004 $7,953,000
Budget estimate, 2005 8,000,000
Committee recommendation 8,000,000

PAYMENT TO THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY FUND

Appropriations, 2004 $43,859,000
Budget estimate, 2005 42,500,000
Committee recommendation 42,500,000

The Foreign Service retirement and disability fund is a mandatory expense of USAID.

OPERATING EXPENSES OF THE UNITED STATES AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Appropriations, 2004 $600,536,000
Emergency supplemental 40,000,000
Budget estimate, 2005 623,400,000
Committee recommendation 600,000,000

The Committee reiterates its concern with USAID's deficient financial, procurement, and personnel management systems, and recognizes that solving these problems will be costly. However, the Committee is encouraged by USAID's efforts to confront its management challenges, and its attempt to rationalize the distribution of its overseas workforce.

The Committee urges USAID and the State Department to streamline its internal clearance processes concerning Congressional notification procedures. USAID and the State Department should consult with the Committee on this issue no later than 60 days after enactment of this Act.

CAPITAL INVESTMENT FUND

Appropriations, 2004 $81,715,000
Emergency supplemental 16,600,000
Budget estimate, 2005 64,800,000
Committee recommendation 59,000,000

The Committee expects to be consulted promptly on the overseas requirements of this fund.

OPERATING EXPENSES OF THE OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2004 $34,794,000
Budget estimate, 2005 35,000,000
Committee recommendation 35,000,000

The Committee commends the Office of the Inspector General for its oversight of USAID projects and activities in Iraq.

The Committee notes that funds appropriated to the Inspector-General of the Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA-IG) under Public Law 108-106 cannot be made available to the USAID-IG or to any other entity following the termination of the CPA-IG without enactment of legislation on this issue.

OTHER BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE

ECONOMIC SUPPORT FUND

Appropriations, 2004 $2,119,919,000
Emergency supplemental 872,000,000
Budget estimate, 2005 2,511,500,000
Committee recommendation 2,470,000,000

PROGRAM ISSUES

CONFLICT DIAMONDS

The Committee provides $2,500,000 in the ESF account to implement the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme [KPCS] which seeks to curtail the flow of conflict diamonds, and urges the State Department to include funding for this purpose in the fiscal year 2006 budget request. The Committee recommends that the State Department and other relevant U.S. Government agencies review the requirements of the KPCS and U.S. laws and regulations implemented pursuant to the Scheme to more effectively inhibit the trade in conflict diamonds. The Committee requests the State Department to consult with the Committee on ways to strengthen this important regime and U.S. implementation of the KPCS.

DEMOCRACY PROGRAMS

The Committee continues its strong support of democracy, human rights and rule of law programs, particularly in countries in the Middle East and Asia.

DEMOCRACY, TRANSPARENCY, AND THE RULE OF LAW IN ISLAMIC COUNTRIES

The Committee provides $25,000,000 for programs and activities which foster democracy, human rights, civic education, women's development, press freedom, and the rule of law in countries with a significant Muslim population. Of these funds, the Committee provides $15,000,000 for DRL's Human Rights and Democracy Fund and $5,000,000 for the NED. The Committee again includes $3,000,000 for professional training for journalists. The Committee provides authority for democracy, human rights, and rule of law programs in Syria.

The Committee condemns and deplores acts of violence against Iraq's Christian minority. The Committee notes Iraq's long tradition of peaceful relations between Muslims and Christians and is concerned that these acts of violence are a deliberate effort to foment religious and civil discord, jeopardizing religious freedom and social stability. The Committee urges the State Department to use its influence with the Iraqi Transitional Government to provide security for religious minorities and promote and protect religious freedom.

The Committee directs the Secretary of State to submit a report not later than 90 days after enactment of this Act describing the total amount of funding the Iraqi National Congress received from the State Department and the uses of the funds (including an assessment of whether the funds were used for publicity or propaganda purposes in the United States), and the amount (if any) in unallowable costs that have been determined to be owed to the United States Government and a description of efforts undertaken to collect amounts owed.

DENIAL OF VISAS TO CORRUPT OFFICIALS

The Committee supports the President's January 12, 2004 proclamation that current and former corrupt public officials (and their family beneficiaries) will be denied entry into the United States, and directs the Secretary of State to submit a report to the Committee not later than 60 days after enactment of this Act setting forth procedures and guidelines for implementing the proclamation and for making public the names of those individuals who have been denied entry.

FREE AND INDEPENDENT MEDIA

The Committee supports programs and activities that promote free and independent media. The Committee notes the success of NGOs, such as Internews, in conducting these programs in predominantly Muslim countries, including Pakistan and Afghanistan.

Given concerns that insufficient funding has been requested for media programs in Indonesia, the Committee provides $3,000,000 to Internews to build the professional and technical skills of regional broadcast media in that country.

The Committee expects the State Department and USAID to provide funding for media programs in Pakistan, Afghanistan, Thailand, Cambodia, Egypt, Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia. Further, the Committee encourages funding for regional training programs for journalists, including those in Southeast Asia. The Committee provides $3,000,000 for programs that provide professional training for journalists, of which $2,000,000 is made available to Internews.

MIDDLE EAST COUNTRIES

In 1998, the United States reached agreements with the Governments of Israel and Egypt to reduce the levels of ESF assistance for these countries over a 10-year schedule. In accordance with this schedule, the Committee provides $360,000,000 for Israel and $535,000,000 for Egypt for fiscal year 2005. The Committee provides $250,000,000 for assistance for Jordan, which reflects the budget request.

The Committee provides a 2-year extension of the loan guarantee program for Israel, and notes that the terms and agreements of the original loan remain unchanged.

As Israel uses FMF funds to pay for IMET training, the Committee believes that the pricing for this training should be equivalent to that provided to IMET-recipients. The Committee notes that this will maximize the use and efficiency of taxpayers' dollars. The Committee requests the State Department to consult with the Committee on other countries that use FMF funds to pay for IMET training and ways to ensure that the lowest rates possible are charged for this training.

The Committee recognizes that economic development in Gaza and the West Bank is essential to security and stability in those areas. The Committee requests USAID to consult with the Committee on how its programs can be used most effectively in the future, if political and security developments in Gaza, in particular, move forward.

The Committee directs USAID to report not later than 90 days after enactment of this Act on ways it plans to support the United States-Israel Cooperative Development Program and Israel's Center for International Cooperation [MASHAV]. The Committee encourages USAID to consider funding ongoing Cooperative Development Research [CDR] programs and the CDR/Central Asian Republic program.

The Committee recommends that the State Department consider funding a proposal by ELEM/Youth in Distress that seeks to address the plight of youth living on the streets of Israeli cities.

MIDDLE EAST PARTNERSHIP INITIATIVE

The Committee supports MEPI, and recommends $4,500,000 for scholarship programs for students from countries with significant Muslim populations at accredited American higher education institutions. The Committee expects MEPI funds to support projects that empower women and children.

The Committee is aware of a joint proposal by Landmine Survivors Network and ResCare to assist underserved populations, including people with disabilities, in several Middle East countries, which may be appropriate for MEPI funding.

The Committee notes the work of Vital Voices Global Partnership to equip women leaders in the Middle East with the skills and resources to participate effectively in the economic, social and political development of their respective countries. The Committee recommends funding for this initiative.

PARTNERSHIP TO ELIMINATE SWEATSHOPS

The Committee supports the Partnership to Eliminate Sweatshops and provides $2,000,000 under the ESF account for this program.

RECONCILIATION PROGRAMS

The Committee provides $15,000,000 under the ESF account to support reconciliation programs and activities which bring together individuals of different ethnic, religious and political backgrounds from areas of civil conflict and war. The Committee notes the strong bipartisan support for these programs, which seek to promote understanding, mutual respect and reconciliation throughout the world. The Committee believes that the following organizations are among those deserving consideration and support:

--The Arava Institute for Environmental Studies, which manages programs that bring college age Arabs and Israelis together to promote better relations and solve common environmental problems;

--Facing History and Ourselves, to expand conflict resolution and democracy in Colombia, the Czech Republic, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Northern Ireland, Rwanda and South Africa;

--Seeds of Peace, which promotes understanding between teenagers in the Middle East, South Asia, Cyprus, and the Balkans;

--Jerusalem International YMCA, which brings together Christian, Jewish and Muslim youth in a positive environment that promotes peace, respect and understanding; and

--Interns for Peace, which unites youth, women and diverse ethnic groups in cooperative development in the Middle East and elsewhere.

TERRORISM IN SOUTHEAST ASIA

The Committee supports a coordinated strategy to undermine the ability of terrorists to gain footholds in Muslim communities throughout Southeast Asia. The Committee believes that, in addition to counterterrorism assistance, development aid (such as basic education, health care, and support for civil society and democratic political parties) can be an effective bulwark against extremism--if appropriately targeted and adequately funded. The Committee continues to be alarmed by terrorist activities in Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia and Cambodia.

The Committee includes a new general provision providing FMF assistance to a number of countries in the region to enhance security in Asia. The Committee supports programs targeted toward increasing maritime security capabilities, including in Indonesia.

The Committee again supports the efforts of the Alliance for Reform and Democracy in Asia [ARDA] to further democracy, human rights and the rule of law throughout the region. In particular, the Committee appreciates the activism of ARDA in the struggle for freedom in Burma, and regrets the decision of the Government of Singapore to prohibit an ARDA-sponsored conference on Burma in Singapore earlier this year. The Committee provides $1,500,000 to the NED for democracy, human rights and the rule of law programs in Asia, and expects a portion of those funds to support the activities of ARDA.

WAR CRIMES TRIBUNALS

The Committee continues to support the war crimes tribunals in the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda, and Sierra Leone. The Committee expects the State Department to ensure that the tribunals have sufficient budgets, staff, and equipment, and provides $32,000,000 in drawdown authority for war crimes tribunals established or authorized by the U.N. Security Council with U.S. support, including the tribunal in Sierra Leone. The Committee also urges the State Department, where appropriate, to support commissions or judicial bodies that complement the activities of these tribunals. The Committee notes that drawdowns made under this section are unrelated to the establishment of an international criminal court.

ASSISTANCE FOR EASTERN EUROPE AND THE BALTIC STATES

Appropriations, 2004 $442,375,000
Budget estimate, 2005 410,000,000
Committee recommendation 410,000,000

The Committee provides $410,000,000 for Eastern Europe and the Baltic States. Funds in this account are allocated in the following table:

ASSISTANCE FOR EASTERN EUROPE AND THE BALTIC STATES
[Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------
                        Fiscal year             
                       2005 request 2005 Senate 
------------------------------------------------
Albania                      28,000      28,000 
Bosnia and Herzegovina       41,000      41,000 
Bulgaria                     27,000      27,000 
Croatia                      20,000      20,000 
Kosovo                       72,000      75,000 
Macedonia                    34,000      34,000 
Romania                      27,000      27,000 
Serbia                       87,000      87,000 
Montenegro                   15,000      15,000 
Regional                     59,000      56,000 
Total                       410,000     410,000 
------------------------------------------------

PROGRAM ISSUES

EAST CENTRAL EUROPEAN SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM [ECESP]

The Committee notes that the USAID-supported ECESP trains professionals who have played important roles in the democratic, economic, and social transformations in the countries ECESP has served. The Committee continues to believe that as USAID moves this and other programs out of East Central Europe, expansion into Central Asia could benefit the people of this region. The Committee requests USAID to consider collaborating with the Center for Intercultural Education and Development to expand this training program into Central Asia.

INTERNATIONAL LEGAL AND ECONOMIC INITIATIVES

The Committee supports public service projects initiated by the American Bar Association [ABA] to strengthen democracy through programs that promote judicial reform and the rule of law in transitional countries. The Committee notes that these programs rely predominantly on the volunteer efforts of American lawyers.

The Committee recommends funding for ABA's Central European and Eurasian Law Initiative [CEELI] at a level not less than in fiscal year 2004. The Committee supports the expansion of ABA's public service projects into Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East. The Committee directs that funding continue to be provided for these programs through cooperative agreements.

The Committee continues to support USAID's distance learning legal education program in the central and eastern European region, and recommends funding for this program at a level not less than in fiscal year 2004.

RELIGIOUS TOLERANCE

The Committee is concerned by the reported presence of Saudi charities in Albania and Kosovo and the potential ramifications for increased religious intolerance and extremism in the region. The Committee supports programs which promote inter-faith cooperation and tolerance throughout the Balkans.

YOUTH PROGRAMS

The Committee reiterates its support for programs that promote greater understanding and interaction among youth in Albania, Kosovo, Montenegro, and Macedonia.

COUNTRY ISSUES

KOSOVO

The Committee provides $75,000,000 to support reconstruction, reform, and reconciliation efforts in Kosovo. The Committee recommends that USAID and the State Department provide funding for the activities of the American University in Kosovo.

SERBIA

The Committee provides $87,000,000 for assistance for Serbia, but requires a reduction of assistance by an amount equivalent to the amount of financial and other support that Serbia has provided to Slobodan Milosevic and other indicted war criminals, and their families, during calendar year 2004.

The Committee is encouraged by the election of Boris Tadic as President of Serbia, who has been a strong advocate for democratic principles, closer relations between Serbia and the United States, and of eventual membership for Serbia in NATO and the EU. The Committee notes that Tadic has pledged full cooperation with the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia [ICTY], and requests the State Department to consult with the Committee should the trials of persons indicted by the ICTY be proposed to be shifted to domestic Serbian courts.

The Committee again requires annual certification of Serbia's cooperation with the ICTY and reiterates its willingness to reconsider this provision if, by the date of conference with the House of Representatives, substantial progress is made in cooperating with the ICTY, including the apprehension and transfer of Radtko Mladic to The Hague.

The Committee continues to support media programs, particularly documentaries, which highlight atrocities committed by Milosevic and other Serb war criminals against their regional neighbors.

ASSISTANCE FOR THE INDEPENDENT STATES OF THE FORMER SOVIET UNION

Appropriations, 2004 $584,531,000
Budget estimate, 2005 550,000,000
Committee recommendation 560,000,000

The Committee provides $560,000,000 for the FSA account, which is $10,000,000 above the budget request. Funds in this account are allocated in the following table:

ASSISTANCE FOR THE INDEPENDENT STATES OF THE FORMER SOVIET UNION
[Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------
                  Fiscal year             
                 2005 request 2005 Senate 
------------------------------------------
Armenia                62,000      75,000 
Azerbajian             38,000      38,000 
Belarus                 6,500       6,500 
Georgia                90,000     100,000 
Kazakhstan             28,000      26,000 
Kyrgyz Republic        33,000      30,000 
Moldova                17,500      17,500 
Russia                 79,500      93,000 
Tajikistan             25,000      25,000 
Turkmenistan            6,000       6,000 
Ukraine                79,500      65,500 
Uzbekistan             36,000      36,000 
Nagorno-Karabagh                    2,500 
Regional FSA           49,000      39,000 
Total                 550,000     560,000 
------------------------------------------

PROGRAM ISSUES

DEMOCRACY AND LEGAL EDUCATION

The Committee continues to support programs conducted by the American Rule of Law Consortium, ABA CEELI, and the Russian American Judicial Partnership to strengthen the rule of law in Russia and other former Soviet republics.

PUBLIC HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENT PROGRAMS

The Committee is aware of the Primary Health Care Initiative of the World Council of Hellenes, which was instituted in the former Soviet republics to provide desperately needed basic health care. The Committee recommends $2,500,000 for this program in fiscal year 2005 and directs that these funds be allocated by the State Department.

The Committee continues to support the work of the Eurasian Medical Education program of the American College of Physicians, which relies on the volunteer partnership contribution of American physicians who share medical skills and knowledge with Russian physicians. The Committee expects that funding for this program in fiscal year 2005 will be at least the amount provided in fiscal year 2004.

The Committee continues to support the work of the Institute for Sustainable Communities in environmental conservation and community development.

ORPHANS

The Committee supports USAID's Russian orphans strategy, which focuses on programs to reduce the number of children entering state orphanages and works with orphanage officials to meet the basic needs of these children. The Committee supports funding for Holt International Children's Services and Mercy Corps International to assist Russian orphans.

The Committee continues to support the work of Kidsave International for Children of the Former Soviet Union, and expects that $450,000 will be provided to support interventions that help countries move children without parents into permanent homes.

The Committee expects USAID to work with non-profit groups, especially those with contacts in the Russian Far East, including Rotary International, the Anchorage Interfaith Council, and the Municipality of Anchorage. The Committee recommends $7,000,000 for these groups in fiscal year 2005.

The Committee supports $1,000,000 for the Firefly Children's Network to enhance health care for Russian orphans.

COUNTRY ISSUES

ARMENIA

The Committee provides $75,000,000 in FSA funds for assistance for Armenia, $13,000,000 above the budget request. The Committee endorses the request of $750,000 in IMET and $300,000 in NADR funds for Armenia.

The Committee provides $8,000,000 under the FMF account for Armenia, which should be made available following an assessment of that country's defense needs by relevant United States and Armenian officials. The Committee encourages Armenia to increase its contributions to the global war against international terrorism, particularly in Afghanistan and Iraq.

GEORGIA

The Committee provides $100,000,000 in FSA funds for Georgia, $10,000,000 above the budget request. The Committee believes that the United States must continue to support the people of Georgia as they build democratic institutions dedicated to freedom and the rule of law.

NAGORNO-KARABAKH

The Committee provides $2,500,000 for humanitarian and relief assistance for Nagorno-Karabakh. The Committee requests USAID to consult within 60 days after enactment of this Act on plans for disbursement of these funds.

RUSSIA

The Committee provides $93,000,000 for assistance for Russia, of which not less than $4,000,000 shall be made available to the NED for democracy, human rights and rule of law programs. This amount is $13,500,000 above the budget request.

In addition to the funds provided to the NED, the Committee directs the State Department to provide not less than $3,000,000 for political party training activities. The Committee believes that an investment in these activities is critical to sustaining democracy promotion efforts in that country.

The Committee recommends $15,000,000 for the bilateral U.S. Civilian Research and Development Foundation, which has effectively implemented U.S.-Former Soviet Union collaboration in science and technology and plays a major role in the Expanded Threat Reduction Program.

The Committee continues to support the work of Communities for International Development and urges USAID to continue funding their programs in Russia.

The Committee is disappointed at Russia's failure to pledge funds for the construction of a new shelter for the Chernobyl nuclear power plant and restricts assistance to Government of Russia if the Secretary of State certifies and reports to the Committee that Russia has not pledged or is not contributing funds other significant resources to the construction of this shelter. The Committee expects France, Italy, Canada, Japan and Germany to shoulder a greater share of the costs of this project.

RUSSIAN FAR EAST

The Committee is particularly disturbed by the potential impact of reduced assistance to successful economic development programs in the Russian Far East, and provides that $20,000,000 shall be made available solely for this region.

The Committee continues to recognize the important contribution to development activities in the Russian Far East by the University of Alaska, and expects USAID to work with the University to establish and coordinate a strategic plan for development activities in that region.

UKRAINE

The Committee provides that not less than $5,000,000 shall be made available for nuclear reactor safety initiatives in Ukraine, and expects that not less than $2,000,000 shall be made available for simulator-related projects.

As in previous years, the Committee provides $3,000,000 for coal mine safety programs in Ukraine.

The Committee recommends that USAID provide $1,000,000 to the Altarum Institute to create a pilot project for the Ukraine Childhood Immunization Information System, which will deliver an operational childhood immunization registry for a geographical region within the Kyiv Oblast. The Committee directs USAID to submit a report within 45 days after enactment of this Act on its plans to support Altarum Institute's activities in Ukraine.

INDEPENDENT AGENCIES

INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION

Appropriations, 2004 $16,238,000
Budget estimate, 2005 15,185,000
Committee recommendation 19,000,000

AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION

Appropriations, 2004 $18,579,000
Budget estimate, 2005 17,000,000
Committee recommendation 20,000,000

PEACE CORPS

Appropriations, 2004 $308,171,000
Budget estimate, 2005 401,000,000
Committee recommendation 310,000,000

The Committee supports the initiation of new programs in Cambodia, Vietnam, and Sierra Leone, and recommends the phase-out of Peace Corps programs in Thailand.

MILLENNIUM CHALLENGE CORPORATION

Appropriations, 2004 $994,100,000
Budget estimate, 2005 2,500,000,000
Committee recommendation 1,120,000,000

The Committee reiterates its strong support for the MCC and provides $1,120,000,000 for its programs and activities, which is $120,000,000 above the fiscal year 2004 enacted level. The Committee directs the MCC Chief Executive Officer to submit a report not later than 90 days after enactment of this Act detailing the process by which the MCC will monitor and evaluate the development and implementation of country compacts. The Committee reiterates its support for programs and activities that further democracy and the rule of law, alleviate poverty (particularly among women and children), and protect and encourage the sustainable use of natural resources.

As there is limited quantitative information on the rights of people with disabilities, the Committee recommends that the MCC Chief Executive Officer utilize funding authorized by section 614(g)(2) of the Millennium Challenge Act of 2003 to address the lack of critical data related to the eligibility criteria of `respect for the human rights and civil rights of people with disabilities'.

The Committee urges the MCC to identify ways it can utilize the expertise of institutions of higher education.

The Committee notes that rural electrification should be considered an important part of an eligible country's rural development strategy.

The Committee is aware that the MCC intends to establish a working group to identify reliable, consistent data for assessing the quality of a country's policies regarding the management of natural resources. While the Committee appreciates this effort, in the meantime, the Committee intends that compact proposals likely to have adverse impacts on the environment should be returned to the applicant country with instructions to seek to eliminate or adequately mitigate such adverse impacts. For countries without the capacity to do so, the compact should include resources for capacity building to ensure that such impacts are eliminated or adequately mitigated.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE

GLOBAL HIV/AIDS INITIATIVE

Appropriations, 2004 $488,103,000
Budget estimate, 2005 1,450,000,000
Committee recommendation 1,450,000,000

The Committee supports the GHI, and provides the budget request for this effort including to support the Office of the Global HIV/AIDS Coordinator. The Committee includes a new general provision that establishes a working capital fund to facilitate procurement of commodities relating to HIV/AIDS assistance.

The Committee has discussed with the Coordinator the imperative to use funds under this account to improve the capacity of foreign governments and NGOs to implement HIV/AIDS prevention, care and treatment programs on a long-term, sustainable basis. As funding for HIV/AIDS continues to increase, this lack of capacity places severe strains on rudimentary health care delivery systems. The Committee expects that additional funds will be made available for capacity building in fiscal year 2005.

The Committee encourages the Coordinator to ensure that the GHI responds to the multi-sectoral nature of the pandemic. The Committee notes that people suffering from HIV/AIDS often lack adequate food and clean water, which makes them more vulnerable to death from AIDS and other infections.

The Committee is concerned that the rapid increase in HIV/AIDS funding puts considerable strain on USAID health personnel, and important programs to combat other deadly diseases in Africa, Latin America, and Asia may be impacted as a result. The Committee requests the Coordinator to consult with the Committee on plans for augmenting staff resources in the focus countries, and ensuring that other USAID health programs are not adversely impacted as a result of the increased focus on HIV/AIDS.

THE GLOBAL FUND AND ASIA

The Committee notes that North Korea is a designated state-sponsor of terrorism and that the SPDC in Burma is an illegitimate military junta that routinely violates the human rights and dignity of the Burmese people, including using rape as a weapon of war.

While sharing the concerns of the Global Fund with the welfare of the North Korean and Burmese people, the Committee prohibits the provision of any assistance, either directly or indirectly, including per diems and capital assets, to these repressive regimes.

The Committee notes that SPDC-affiliated organizations include, among others, the Myanmar Maternal and Child Welfare Association [MMCWA], the Myanmar Council of Churches [MMC]; the Myanmar Medical Association [MMA], the Myanmar Women Affairs Federation [MWAF], and the Union of Solidarity Development Association [USDA].

INTERNATIONAL NARCOTICS CONTROL AND LAW ENFORCEMENT

Appropriations, 2004 $240,274,000
Emergency supplemental 170,000,000
Budget estimate, 2005 358,820,000
Committee recommendation 328,820,000

The Committee requires that all reprogramming of funds under this heading shall be subject to the same review and approval procedures by the State Department as apply to the reprogramming of ESF.

The Committee provides $17,000,000 for the International Law Enforcement Training Academies [ILEA], an increase of $2,500,000 above the budget request. The Committee expects this increase to be divided equally among the five academies.

The Committee supports the participation of law enforcement officials from Timor Leste in regional ILEA training activities.

The Committee notes with concern the growing illicit drug trade in Cambodia and the involvement of Cambodian government officials, including the police and military, in this trade, and encourages the State Department to provide resources and personnel to address this problem. While the prohibition on assistance for the central Government of Cambodia remains, the Committee includes a new exception for counternarcotics activities in section 554 of this Act.

The Committee provides $12,000,000 for police training and related assistance for the Philippines, which is an increase of $10,000,000 above the budget request.

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

The Committee provides $5,000,000 for combating piracy of United States intellectual property. The Committee commends the work of the State Department to implement a pilot project to protect intellectual property rights overseas, and notes that this initiative can assist developing nations to strengthen the rule of law while simultaneously protecting jobs and industry in the United States.

The Committee directs the Secretary of State to submit a report not later than 120 days after enactment of this Act on the status of implementation of this program.

TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS

The Committee recommends a total of $45,000,000 for programs and activities to counter trafficking in persons, and provides $15,000,000 for this purpose from the INCLE account. The Committee expects the balance of these funds to come from the following accounts: $15,000,000 in ESF; $7,000,000 in SEED; and $8,000,000 in FSA.

The Committee again underscores the importance of programs to prevent the trafficking of girls and women, and protecting and providing services for victims.

ANDEAN COUNTERDRUG INITIATIVE

Appropriations, 2004 $726,687,000
Budget estimate, 2005 731,000,000
Committee recommendation 731,000,000

The Committee requires that all reprogramming of funds under this heading shall be subject to the same review and approval procedures by the State Department as apply to the reprogramming of ESF funds.

The Committee provides a total of $272,000,000 for alternative development/institution building programs under the ACI, $240,000,000 of which shall be apportioned directly to USAID, including $140,000,000 for Colombia. The Committee provides not less than $6,000,000 for judicial reform programs in Colombia which are administered by the Justice Department, and an additional $6,000,000 for USAID to support organizations and programs to protect human rights, including the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights in Colombia.

The Committee notes that the Foreign Operations Appropriations Act, 2004, included a provision that not less than $2,500,000 should be made available for assistance for the Colombian National Park Service. However, due to changed circumstances, including the replacement of the director of the Park Service, the Committee directs that these fiscal year 2004 funds be made available instead to USAID to support direct grants to NGOs that work with indigenous communities bordering the parks, to promote conservation of the parks. The Committee requests USAID to consult with the former director of the Park Service, and with the Committee, on the use of these funds.

The Committee recognizes the work of Mobile Medical International, an organization dedicated to improving the delivery of health care services in remote parts of the world. The Committee recommends that $1,000,000 from this heading be provided to support these efforts in the Andean Region, and supports additional funding for Mobil Medical from other accounts in this Act to further their activities in the Middle East.

COLOMBIA

The Committee reiterates its support for the efforts of Colombian President Uribe to tackle the threats of terrorism and narcotics in that country.

The Committee continues to support programs that bolster political and judicial reforms in Colombia, and that provide alternative development opportunities in rural areas.

The Committee includes language concerning the safety of chemical herbicide used in aerial fumigation programs in Colombia, and, as in previous years, requires the Secretary of State to certify that the herbicide mixture is being used in accordance with EPA label requirements for comparable use in the United States and with Colombian laws, and that it does not pose unreasonable risks or adverse effects to human health or the environment.

The Committee directs the Secretary of State to submit a report not later than 60 days after enactment of this Act describing progress in completing an objective study of the health and environmental effects of the fumigation, and expects the State Department to continue to work with relevant Colombian authorities to ensure that complaints of harm to health or licit crops caused by the fumigation program are objectively evaluated and fair compensation is promptly paid to meritorious claims.

The Committee includes language, similar to last year, requiring the Secretary of State to certify that human rights conditions have been met prior to the obligation of 25 percent of the assistance for the Colombian military, and to consult with the International Committee of the Red Cross and the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights in Colombia regarding the conditions, prior to making a certification.

The Committee directs the Secretary of State to submit a report not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act on aerial eradication and surveillance equipment procurement needs for ongoing counterdrug operations in Colombia, including additional aircraft requirements.

The Committee continues to support the League of Displaced Women of Bolivar, which works to provide food, medical care, shelter, and income opportunities for displaced women and children.

MIGRATION AND REFUGEE ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2004 $755,712,000
Budget estimate, 2005 729,789,000
Committee recommendation 775,000,000

The Committee provides $775,000,000 for the MRA account, an increase of $45,211,000 above the budget request. The Committee expects some of the additional funds to address humanitarian needs of refugees in Sudan and other parts of Africa.

The Committee believes that the protection of refugees, especially women and children, is a critical priority and includes additional funds in the MRA and ERMA accounts to address this need. The Committee directs the Secretary of State to submit a report no later than 180 days after enactment of this Act on the status of efforts to improve the protection of refugees.

BURMESE REFUGEES

The Committee remains concerned with the plight of Burmese refugees and displaced persons residing in Thailand and the Government of Thailand's crack down on persons fleeing political and ethnic persecution in Burma. The Committee notes that this crack down, combined with the collusion between corrupt Thai officials and human traffickers, may heighten the exposure of Burmese and ethnic minority women and girls to sexual violence and HIV/AIDS infection. The Committee calls upon the Government of Thailand to address this issue in a manner consistent with Thai laws and regulations and international obligations, including those ensuring the protection of human rights.

The Committee provides that funds under the MRA and ERMA accounts shall be made available to NGOs located in Thailand for humanitarian assistance to internally displaced persons in Burma. The Committee expects NGOs working in Thailand on Burmese refugee issues to be funded at amounts above the fiscal year 2004 level. The Committee recommends not less than $3,500,000 be provided to the Burma Border Consortium.

The Committee also provides an additional $4,000,000 under the ESF account for displaced Burmese and host communities in Thailand, of which $3,000,000 is made available to Thailand-based NGOs operating along the Thai-Burma border. The Committee expects the State Department to manage these funds.

MONTAGNARDS

The Committee notes with concern the plight of the Montagnard people in Vietnam and Cambodia and condemns the repressive actions of the governments of both countries against this population. The Committee urges the Government of Cambodia to cease forced repatriations of Montagnard refugees from Cambodia to Vietnam, and to provide full access to refugee and human rights organizations into areas where Montagnards are fleeing.

The Committee supports the Montagnard Development Project [MDP], which seeks to provide humanitarian and development support to the Montagnard people, and recommends up to $5,000,000 for MDP.

REFUGEES AND INTERNALLY DISPLACED PERSONS IN AFRICA

The Committee notes the dire situation of millions of refugees and IDPs throughout Africa living in deplorable conditions. The Committee urges the administration to work with international organizations, including the WFP and UNHCR, as well as other governments to provide additional assistance to African refugees and IDPs in fiscal year 2005.

RESETTLEMENT IN ISRAEL

The Committee provides not less than $50,000,000 for the resettlement of humanitarian migrants from the former Soviet Union and other countries of distress to Israel and notes the continued decline in the number of refugees resettling in Israel. The Committee also recognizes increased costs in resettling refugees from Ethiopia. If these trends continue, the Committee expects the fiscal year 2006 budget request for resettlement programs to be $40,000,000.

TIBETAN REFUGEES

The Committee continues to closely follow the plight of Tibetan refugees transiting through Nepal to resettlement in India. The Committee expects the Government of Nepal to fulfill its commitments to provide safe passage to Tibetans fleeing repression in their homeland. The Committee recommends that not less than $2,000,000 should be provided for Tibetan refugees in Nepal and India.

VIETNAMESE ASYLUM SEEKERS

The Committee commends the State Department and the Government of the Philippines for their efforts to resolve the fate of Vietnamese asylum seekers and their families in the Philippines. The Committee encourages the State Department to give all asylum seekers the right of interview and to bring closure to all outstanding cases in a timely manner.

The Committee expects the State Department to work with the Philippines and other resettlement countries to permanently resolve the status of all asylum seekers.

EMERGENCY REFUGEE AND MIGRATION ASSISTANCE FUND

Appropriations, 2004 $29,823,000
Budget estimate, 2005 20,000,000
Committee recommendation 50,000,000

The Committee provides $50,000,000 for the ERMA account, an increase of $30,000,000 above the budget request.

NONPROLIFERATION, ANTI-TERRORISM, DEMINING AND RELATED PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2004 $351,414,000
Emergency supplemental 35,000,000
Budget estimate, 2005 415,200,000
Committee recommendation 415,200,000
By transfer (5,000,000)

The Committee provides $415,200,000 for the NADR account, and an additional $5,000,000 by transfer from the FMF account. The Committee continues its support for these programs which are critical to efforts by the United States to combat the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, reduce stockpiles of small arms, prevent and respond to international terrorism, and help improve border security. Funds in this account are allocated in the following table:

NADR
[Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
                                               Fiscal year             
                                              2005 request 2005 Senate 
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund               34,500      34,500 
[NDF by transfer from FMF]                                     [2,500] 
Export Control and Border Security Assistance       38,000      38,000 
IAEA--Voluntary Contribution                        53,000      53,000 
CTBT/International Monitoring System                19,000      19,000 
Nonproliferation of WMD Expertise                   50,500      50,500 
Anti-terrorism Assistance                          128,300     128,300 
[ATA by transfer from FMF]                                     [2,500] 
Counterterrorism Financing                           7,500       7,500 
Terrorist Interdiction Program                       5,000       5,000 
CT Engagement with Allies                              500         500 
Humanitarian Demining                               59,900      59,900 
International Trust Fund for Demining               10,000      10,000 
Small Arms/Light Weapons                             9,000       9,000 
Subtotal NADR                                      415,200     415,200 
By Transfer                                                    [5,000] 
Total NADR                                                     420,200 
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

ANTI-TERRORISM ASSISTANCE

The Committee directs the State Department to utilize to the maximum extent practicable the facilities of the U.S. Army's Aberdeen Proving Grounds, the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in Socorro, New Mexico, Louisiana State University and the Louisiana State Police facilities in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in carrying out the ATA program. The Committee recommends funding ATA programs in New Mexico and Louisiana at or above the fiscal year 2002 levels.

To bolster efforts to combat international terrorism, the Committee recommends $10,000,000 for mobile robot systems and radiation detection technology produced by REMOTEC and Nucsafe, Incorporated.

HUMANITARIAN DEMINING

The Committee supports the State Department's Humanitarian Demining Program to clear landmines and other unexploded ordnance that continue to endanger people in over 60 countries. The Committee provides $59,900,000 for these activities, and $10,000,000 for the International Trust Fund on a dollar-for-dollar matching basis.

The Committee notes that the State Department has developed public-private partnerships with NGOs, foundations, and private companies, in support of mine action activities. To enhance the effectiveness of these public-private partnerships, the Committee provides the State Department with authority to enter into grants and cooperative agreements. To the maximum extent feasible, grants and cooperative agreements should be used to support mine action activities of NGOs.

The Committee notes that several country recipients of demining funds from the NADR account also receive large amounts of assistance from the ESF, SEED, or FSA accounts. The Committee is concerned with pressures on the NADR budget which contains a limited amount of humanitarian demining funds and believes that demining programs in these countries should be funded jointly from both NADR and these other accounts.

SMALL ARMS/LIGHT WEAPONS [SA/LW]

The Committee provides $9,000,000 for the destruction of SA/LW, and recommends that the State Department provide sufficient funding to secure and destroy stockpiles of Soviet-era weaponry in Georgia.

TERRORISM IN THE SAHEL

The Committee directs the Secretary of State to submit a report no later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this Act on counterterrorism assistance in the Sahel region of Africa. The report shall include a strategy for counterterrorism assistance to the countries of the Sahel region including Mauritania, Morocco, Mali, Algeria, Niger and Chad; a description of a mechanism for consistent and coordinated review of assistance activities related to counterterrorism in the Sahel region between the State Department's Bureaus of African Affairs and Near East Affairs; and a description of resource requirements for the next 18 months for an effective comprehensive counterterrorism program for the Sahel.

CONFLICT RESPONSE FUND

Appropriations, 2004 ...........................
Budget estimate, 2005 $100,000,000
Committee recommendation 20,000,000

The Committee provides $20,000,000 for a Conflict Response Fund. The purpose of this new account is to enable the State Department, as the lead United States Government foreign affairs agency, to respond more effectively to potential, ongoing, and post-conflict situations in foreign countries. Activities envisioned under this new account include: (1) planning for humanitarian consequences of conflict; (2) preventing acts of ethnic cleansing, mass killings, genocide, and other acts of civil conflict that pose threats to regional or international peace; (3) providing for the protection of people, in particular, women and girls, affected by conflict; (4) providing support for intervention operations aimed at bringing about a peaceful resolution of conflict; (5) promoting the demobilization of combatants and reintegration of former combatants into civilian life; (6) restoring a secure environment including through support for security forces, peacekeeping, and peace environment; and (7) undertaking to meet immediate reconstruction needs including support for civil society, the rule of law and civilian police forces.

The Committee expects that subsequent requests for funding for this account will not be `pre-programmed' in order that the Fund can respond to genuinely unforeseen contingencies.

The Committee notes that the Foreign Assistance Act and the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act provide flexibility to allow the State Department and USAID to respond to unforeseen emergencies through the MRA, ERMA, PKO, OTI, and IDFA accounts. In addition to the creation of a Conflict Response Fund, the Committee encourages increases in these accounts in subsequent fiscal year budget requests. The Committee recognizes the work of the Center for Global Development and the Center for Strategic and International Studies on this issue.

DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS TECHNICAL TRAINING

Appropriations, 2004 $18,888,000
Budget estimate, 2005 17,500,000
Committee recommendation 17,500,000

DEBT RESTRUCTURING

Appropriations, 2004 $94,440,000
Budget estimate, 2005 200,000,000
Committee recommendation 95,000,000

The Committee provides $95,000,000 for debt restructuring, of which $20,000,000 is for the Tropical Forest Conservation Act [TFCA] and $75,000,000 is to complete the U.S. pledge to the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries Initiative Trust Fund. The Committee notes that, under TFCA debt deals, the total contribution to forest conservation is substantially greater than the amount provided by the United States. The Committee supports the use of up to $1,000,000 for the expenses of relevant U.S. Government agencies in administering this program.

While the Committee supports bilateral debt reduction for DROC, budget constraints preclude funding the request for this purpose in this Act. The Committee recommends that the Department of the Treasury pursue funding for DROC in a subsequent appropriations bill and supports increased funding for DROC through the CSHPF and DA accounts. The Committee appreciates the efforts of the Department on this issue.

TITLE III

MILITARY ASSISTANCE

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT

INTERNATIONAL MILITARY EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Appropriations, 2004 $91,159,000
Budget estimate, 2005 89,730,000
Committee recommendation 89,730,000

The Committee continues its support for the IMET program and provides $89,730,000 for this account.

The Committee encourages additional support under the IMET account to U.S. allies in the war against international terrorism, including the Philippines, Georgia, and Mongolia.

FOREIGN MILITARY FINANCING

GRANT PROGRAM LEVEL

Appropriations, 2004 $4,268,665,000
Emergency supplemental 287,000,000
Budget estimate, 2005 4,957,500,000
Committee recommendation 4,777,500,000
By transfer (150,000,000)

The Committee provides $4,777,500,000 for the FMF account, and authority to transfer $150,000,000 in prior year, unobligated ESF and FMF balances to this account.

GEORGIA

The Committee provides $15,000,000 for assistance for Georgia, which is $3,000,000 above the budget request. The Committee notes with appreciation Georgia's contributions to the war against international terrorism in Iraq.

LIMITATION ON ASSISTANCE TO SECURITY FORCES

The Committee appreciates the efforts of DRL to develop a central computer data base of foreign security force units and individuals who have been credibly alleged to have been involved in gross violations of human rights. The Committee understands that this data base will contain information collected from a wide range of sources, including human rights organizations, and will enable U.S. officials to readily retrieve this information when determining the eligibility of foreign security forces for U.S. assistance.

MIDDLE EAST COUNTRIES

The Committee provides the budget request of $2,220,000,000 for Israel, $1,300,000,000 for Egypt, and $206,000,000 for Jordan.

THE PHILIPPINES

The Committee provides $55,000,000 for assistance for the Philippines, which is $25,000,000 above the budget request. The Committee notes the interests of the Philippine Armed Forces to upgrade capabilities for coastal defense, force security, and marine counterterrorism. The Committee requests the State and Defense Departments, as appropriate, to consult with the Government of the Philippines on future defense needs to meet marine upgrade requirements.

TUNISIA

The Committee provides $10,000,000 in FMF, and supports the budget request of $1,875,500 in IMET assistance, for Tunisia.

PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS

Appropriations, 2004 $74,458,000
Emergency supplemental 50,000,000
Budget estimate, 2005 104,000,000
Committee recommendation 104,000,000

The Committee supports the proposed Global Peace Operations Initiative and provides authority for the Defense Department to transfer funds to the State Department for this purpose. The Committee understands that $80,000,000 in fiscal year 2005 funds appropriated to the Defense Department may be transferred to the State Department for this Initiative.

The Committee directs the Secretary of State to submit, not later than 120 days after enactment of this Act, a report describing efforts to (1) enhance training provided under the Enhanced Peacekeeping Capabilities [EPIC] initiative and (2) model the African Contingency Operations Training program on the EPIC initiative.

TITLE IV

MULTILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE

INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS SUMMARY

Appropriations, 2004 $1,383,041,000
Budget estimate, 2005 1,492,731,000
Committee recommendation 1,151,900,000

The Committee recommends the total amount of paid-in capital funding shown above to provide for contributions to the International Development Association, the Global Environment Facility, the Inter-American Development Bank's Multilateral Investment Fund, the Asian Development Fund, the African Development Bank and Fund, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, and the International Fund for Agriculture Development.

ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

The Committee includes a provision which updates the process for reviewing MDB proposals by including new institutions and requiring website distribution of proposals under review. An assessment is required on proposals that would result or be likely to result in a significant impact on the environment prior to an affirmative U.S. vote. The Committee provides for the simultaneous circulation of assessments and related draft loan, credit, grant, guarantee or policy, and requires that the assessment cover not only the immediate impacts of any part of an MDB funded proposal, but also any associated or cumulative impacts resulting from facilities associated with an MDB funded proposal. If the final proposal has significantly different impacts than the draft that was assessed, a supplement to the assessment should be circulated along with the final proposal for the standard 120 day review period. Potential impacts in advance of Board consideration should include best, most likely, and worst case scenarios.

The Committee requests the Secretary of the Treasury and the USAID Administrator to consult with the Committee on fulfillment of certain mandatory duties under Title XIII of the International Financial Institutions Act, including establishing a system for sharing information with other countries and reporting to Congress and the public at least every 6 months on MDB proposals that present serious risks.

EXTRACTION OF NATURAL RESOURCES

The Committee is aware that some resource rich, developing countries do not accurately record or publicize receipts and expenditures of government revenues from the extraction and export of natural resources. The Committee is concerned that in these countries, U.S. foreign assistance is often used to provide basic services to local populations, including HIV/AIDS prevention, healthcare and education while billions of dollars disappear into the pockets of corrupt officials. In contrast, in western countries, revenues and expenditures from the extraction or export of natural resources are recorded, audited, and publicly available. The Committee has included a provision which requires the Secretary of the Treasury to inform the managements of the international financial institutions and the public that it is the policy of the United States that assistance by such institutions for the extraction of oil, gas, coal, timber, or other natural resources should not be provided unless the government of the country has in place or is taking the necessary steps to establish functioning systems for accurately accounting for such revenues and expenditures, independently auditing and publicly disseminating such audits, and verifying government receipts against company payments and publicly disseminating such payment information with appropriate safeguards. The Committee also requires a report from the Secretary.

INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT

GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT FACILITY

Appropriations, 2004 $138,418,000
Budget estimate, 2005 120,678,000
Committee recommendation 120,678,000

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION

Appropriations, 2004 $907,812,000
Budget estimate, 2005 1,061,310,000
Committee recommendation 820,000,000

INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

MULTILATERAL INVESTMENT FUND

Appropriations, 2004 $24,853,000
Budget estimate, 2005 25,000,000
Committee recommendation 15,000,000

ASIAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

ASIAN DEVELOPMENT FUND

Appropriations, 2004 $143,569,000
Budget estimate, 2005 112,212,000
Committee recommendation 69,691,000

The Committee is concerned that the ADB may indirectly be providing moderate amounts of assistance to the SPDC in Rangoon through support for regional technical assistance programs and activities. The Committee notes that Burma is $28,700,000 in arrears.

The Committee provides that the Secretary of the Treasury shall instruct the U.S. executive director at each appropriate international financial institution, which includes the ADB, to vote against any loan or financial or technical assistance or any other utilization of funds to and for Burma. The Committee expects greater vigilance in ensuring that no loans or other forms of assistance are provided either directly or indirectly to Burma.

AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

Appropriations, 2004 $5,075,000
Budget estimate, 2005 5,100,000
Committee recommendation 1,100,000

The Committee is concerned with the African Development Bank's handling of employee grievances. The Committee has received complaints about a lack of due process and long delays in the adjudication of such cases, and intends to closely follow this issue.

AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FUND

Appropriations, 2004 $112,060,000
Budget estimate, 2005 118,000,000
Committee recommendation 75,000,000

EUROPEAN BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT

Appropriations, 2004 $35,222,000
Budget estimate, 2005 35,431,000
Committee recommendation 35,431,000

INTERNATIONAL FUND FOR AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT

Appropriations, 2004 $14,915,000
Budget estimate, 2005 15,000,000
Committee recommendation 15,000,000

The Committee recognizes that poverty is a substantial obstacle to political, economic, and social development and urges increased funding for IFAD in subsequent fiscal year budget requests.

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2004 $319,752,000
Budget estimate, 2005 304,450,000
Committee recommendation 328,925,000

The Committee provides $328,925,000 for the IO&P account. This amount is $24,475,000 above the budget request. Funds in this account are allocated in the following table:

IO&P
[Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                  Fiscal year             
                                                                 2005 request 2005 Senate 
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
U.N. Fund for Tech. Cooperation in Human Rights                         1,500       1,500 
U.N. Voluntary Fund for Victims of Torture                              5,000       7,500 
OAS Fund for Strengthening Democracy                                    2,500       1,500 
UNDP                                                                   90,000     112,000 
UNIFEM                                                                  1,000       1,500 
UNICEF                                                                120,000     125,000 
OAS Development Assistance                                              5,500       2,500 
WTO                                                                     1,000       1,000 
ICAO Aviation Programs                                                  1,000       1,000 
UNEP                                                                   10,025      12,000 
IMO Maritime Security Programs                                            100         100 
WFP (from USAID funds)                                                  6,000     [6,000] 
Montreal Protocol                                                      21,500      21,500 
International Conservation Programs (CITES/ITTO/IUCN/Ramsar/CCD)        6,225       6,725 
IPCC/UNFCCC                                                             5,600       6,100 
Scientific Educational and Cultural Activities                            500       2,000 
World Meterological Organization                                        2,000       1,500 
UN-HABITAT                                                                            500 
Reserve to be allocated                                                25,000      25,000 
Total                                                                 304,450     328,925 
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

WORLD FOOD PROGRAM

As in previous years, the Committee provides $6,000,000 for the WFP from funds from USAID's Bureau for Democracy, Conflict, and Humanitarian Assistance under section 534(h) of this bill. The Committee continues to support the work of the WFP.

UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

The Committee commends the leadership of UNDP and provides $112,000,000, which is an increase of $22,000,000 above the budget request.

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND

The Committee supports efforts to reach the child survival goals set by the World Summit for Children, the Millennium Development Goals, and the 2002 U.N. Special Session on Children. UNICEF is an essential partner of the United States in achieving these goals, and the Committee provides $125,000,000 for UNICEF, an increase of $5,000,000 above the budget request.

UN-HABITAT

The Committee supports the efforts of UN-HABITAT to improve the lives of slum dwellers and ameliorate urban problems around the world, and provides $500,000 for a contribution to UN-HABITAT.

TITLE V

GENERAL PROVISIONS

SEC. 501. Compensation for United States Executive Directors to International Financial Institutions.

SEC. 502. Restrictions on Voluntary Contributions to United Nations Agencies.

SEC. 503. Limitation on Residence Expenses.

SEC. 504. Limitation on Expenses.

SEC. 505. Limitation on Representational Allowances.

SEC. 506. Prohibition on Taxation of United States Assistance.

SEC. 507. Prohibition Against Direct Funding for Certain Countries.

SEC. 508. Military Coups.

SEC. 509. Transfers.

SEC. 510. Commercial Leasing of Defense Articles.

SEC. 511. Availability of Funds.

SEC. 512. Limitation on Assistance to Countries in Default.

SEC. 513. Commerce and Trade.

SEC. 514. Surplus Commodities.

SEC. 515. Notification Requirements.

SEC. 516. Limitation on Availability of Funds for International Organizations and Programs.

SEC. 517. Independent States of the Former Soviet Union.

SEC. 518. Prohibition on Funding for Abortions and Involuntary Sterilization.

SEC. 519. Export Financing Transfer Authorities.

SEC. 520. Special Notification Requirements.

SEC. 521. Definition of Program, Project, and Activity.

SEC. 522. Child Survival and Health Activities.

SEC. 523. Afghanistan.

SEC. 524. Notification of Excess Defense Equipment.

SEC. 525. HIV/AIDS Working Capital Fund.

SEC. 526. Democracy Programs.

SEC. 527. Prohibition on Bilateral Assistance to Terrorist Countries.

SEC. 528. Debt-for-Development.

SEC. 529. Separate Accounts.

SEC. 530. Enterprise Fund Restrictions.

SEC. 531. Burma.

SEC. 532. Authorities for the Peace Corps, Inter-American Foundation and African Development Foundation.

SEC. 533. Impact on Jobs in the United States.

SEC. 534. Special Authorities.

SEC. 535. Arab League Boycott of Israel.

SEC. 536. Eligibility for Assistance.

SEC. 537. Reservations of Funds.

SEC. 538. Ceilings and Earmarks.

SEC. 539. Prohibition on Publicity or Propaganda.

SEC. 540. Prohibition of Payments to United Nations Members.

SEC. 541. Nongovernmental Organizations--Documentation.

SEC. 542. Prohibition on Assistance to Foreign Governments that Export Lethal Military Equipment to Countries Supporting International Terrorism.

SEC. 543. Withholding of Assistance for Parking Fines Owed by Foreign Countries.

SEC. 544. Limitation on Assistance for the PLO for the West Bank and Gaza.

SEC. 545. War Crimes Tribunals Drawdown.

SEC. 546. Landmines.

SEC. 547. Restrictions Concerning the Palestinian Authority.

SEC. 548. Prohibition of Payment of Certain Expenses.

SEC. 549. Haiti.

SEC. 550. Limitation on Assistance to the Palestinian Authority.

SEC. 551. Limitation on Assistance to Security Forces.

SEC. 552. Foreign Military Training Report.

SEC. 553. Authorization Requirement.

SEC. 554. Cambodia.

SEC. 555. Palestinian Statehood.

SEC. 556. Colombia.

SEC. 557. Illegal Armed Groups.

SEC. 558. Prohibition on Assistance to the Palestinian Broadcasting Corporation.

SEC. 559. West Bank and Gaza Program.

SEC. 560. Contributions to United Nations Population Fund.

SEC. 561. War Criminals.

SEC. 562. User Fees.

SEC. 563. Funding for Serbia.

SEC. 564. Community-Based Police Assistance.

SEC. 565. Special Debt Relief for the Poorest.

SEC. 566. Authority to Engage in Debt Buybacks or Sales.

SEC. 567. Basic Education.

SEC. 568. Reconciliation Programs.

SEC. 569. Environment Programs.

SEC. 570. Central Asia.

SEC. 571. Excess Defense Articles for Central and South European Countries and Certain Other Countries.

SEC. 572. Disability Rights.

SEC. 573. Zimbabwe.

SEC. 574. Tibet.

SEC. 575. Indonesia.

SEC. 576. University Programs.

SEC. 577. Nigeria.

SEC. 578. Discrimination Against Minority Religious Faiths in the Russian Federation.

SEC. 579. Nicaragua and Guatemala.

SEC. 580. War Crimes in Africa.

SEC. 581. Admission of Refugees.

SEC. 582. Code of Conduct.

SEC. 583. Disaster Surge Capacity.

SEC. 584. Denial of Visas to Corrupt Officials.

SEC. 585. Assistance for Victims of Torture.

SEC. 586. United States Agency for International Development Pilot Management Initiative.

SEC. 587. United States Agency for International Development Hiring Authority.

SEC. 588. Certain Claims for Expropriation by the Government of Nicaragua.

SEC. 589. Overseas Private Investment Corporation and Export-Import Bank Restrictions.

SEC. 590. Security in Asia.

SEC. 591. Cooperation with Cuba on Counter-Narcotics Matters.

SEC. 592. HIPC Debt Reduction and Trust Fund.

SEC. 593. Assistance to Millennium Challenge Candidate Countries.

SEC. 594. Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant.

SEC. 595. Debt Restructuring Authority.

SEC. 596. Compliance with the Algiers Agreements.

SEC. 597. North Korea and Burma.

SEC. 598. Thailand.

SEC. 599. Administrative Provisions Related to Multilateral Development Banks.

SEC. 599A. Vietnamese Refugees.

SEC. 599B. Extraction of Natural Resources.

SEC. 599C. Assistance for Foreign Nongovernmental Organizations.

SEC. 599D. Sudan.

SEC. 599E. Additional Funds for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE SENATE

Rule XVI, paragraph 7 requires that every report on a general appropriation bill filed by the Committee must identify each recommended amendment, with particularity, which proposes an item of appropriation which is not made to carry out the provisions of an existing law, a treaty stipulation, or an act or resolution previously passed by the Senate during that session.

Items providing funding for fiscal year 2005 which lack authorization are as follows:


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                          Amount 
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Child Survival and Health Programs Fund                           $1,550,000,000 
Development Assistance                                             1,460,000,000 
International Disaster and Famine Assistance                         385,500,000 
Transition Initiatives                                                50,000,000 
Development Credit Authority                                           8,000,000 
USAID Operating Expenses                                             600,000,000 
USAID Operating Expenses, Office of Inspector General                 35,000,000 
USAID Capital Investment Fund                                         59,000,000 
Economic Support Fund                                              2,470,000,000 
Assistance for Eastern Europe and the Baltics                        410,000,000 
Assistance for the Independent States of the Former Soviet Union     560,000,000 
Inter-American Foundation                                             19,000,000 
African Development Foundation                                        20,000,000 
Peace Corps                                                          310,000,000 
International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement                  328,820,000 
Andean Counterdrug Initiative                                        731,000,000 
Migration and Refugee Assistance                                     775,000,000 
Emergency Migration and Refugee Assistance                            50,000,000 
Nonproliferation, Anti-Terrorism, Demining and Related Assistance    415,200,000 
Conflict Response Fund                                                20,000,000 
Treasury Technical Assistance                                         17,500,000 
Debt Restructuring                                                    95,000,000 
International Military Education and Training                         89,730,000 
Foreign Military Financing Program                                 4,777,500,000 
Peacekeeping Operations                                              104,000,000 
International Organizations and Programs                             328,925,000 
International Development Association                                820,000,000 
Asian Development Fund                                                69,691,000 
African Development Fund                                              75,000,000 
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(C), RULE XXVI, OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE SENATE

Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, on September 15, 2004, the Committee ordered reported en bloc S. 2809, an original bill making appropriations for Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and related agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2005, S. 2812, an original bill making appropriations for the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and related programs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2005; and S. 2810, an original bill making appropriations for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and related agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2005, each subject to amendment and each subject to the budget allocations, by a recorded vote of 29-0, a quorum being present. The vote was as follows:

Yeas Nays
Chairman Stevens
Mr. Cochran
Mr. Specter
Mr. Domenici
Mr. Bond
Mr. McConnell
Mr. Burns
Mr. Shelby
Mr. Gregg
Mr. Bennett
Mr. Campbell
Mr. Craig
Mrs. Hutchison
Mr. DeWine
Mr. Brownback
Mr. Byrd
Mr. Inouye
Mr. Hollings
Mr. Leahy
Mr. Harkin
Ms. Mikulski
Mr. Reid
Mr. Kohl
Mrs. Murray
Mr. Dorgan
Mrs. Feinstein
Mr. Durbin
Mr. Johnson
Ms. Landrieu

COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE SENATE

Paragraph 12 of rule XXVI requires that Committee report on a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any statute or part of any statute include `(a) the text of the statute or part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and (b) a comparative print of that part of the bill or joint resolution making the amendment and of the statute or part thereof proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through type and italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate typographical devices the omissions and insertions which would be made by the bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form recommended by the committee.'

In compliance with this rule, the following changes in existing law proposed to be made by the bill are shown as follows: existing law to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new matter is printed in italic, and existing law in which no change is proposed is shown in roman.

With respect to this bill, it is the opinion of the Committee that it is necessary to dispense with these requirements in order to expedite the business of the Senate.

BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL
PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS AMENDED
[In millions of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                                                                        Budget authority                             Outlays                
                                                                                                                                                                    Committee allocation Amount of bill Committee allocation Amount of bill 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with Committee allocations to its subcommittees of amounts in the Budget Resolution for 2005: Subcommittee on Foreign Operations:                                                                         
Discretionary                                                                                                                                                                     19,386         19,386               26,785       1 26,728 
Mandatory                                                                                                                                                                             43             43                   43           1 43 
Projection of outlays associated with the recommendation:                                                                                                                                                                                   
2005                                                                                                                                                                                                                                2 6,958 
2006                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  7,090 
2007                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  2,971 
2008                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  1,325 
2009 and future years                                                                                                                                                                                                                 1,122 
Financial assistance to State and local governments for 2005                                                                                                                          NA             NA                                     
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET (OBLIGATIONAL) AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2004 AND BUDGET ESTIMATES AND AMOUNTS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL FOR FISCAL YEAR 2005
[In thousands of dollars]
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Item                                                                                            2004 appropriation Budget estimate Committee recommendation Senate Committee recommendation compared with (+ or -)                 
                                                                                                                                                                                                2004 appropriation Budget estimate 
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TITLE I--EXPORT AND INVESTMENT ASSISTANCE                                                                                                                                                                                          
EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES                                                                                                                                                                                            
Subsidy appropriation                                                                                                      125,700                  115,700                                               +115,700         -10,000 
Administrative expenses                                                                                     72,465          73,200                   73,200                                                   +735                 
Inspector General                                                                                                            1,140                    1,140                                                 +1,140                 
Negative subsidy                                                                                           -34,000         -33,000                  -33,000                                                 +1,000                 
Total, Export-Import Bank of the United States                                                              38,465         167,040                  157,040                                               +118,575         -10,000 
OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION                                                                                                                                                                                            
Noncredit account:                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Administrative expenses                                                                                     41,141          42,885                   42,885                                                 +1,744                 
Insurance fees and other offsetting collections                                                           -272,000        -278,000                 -278,000                                                 -6,000                 
Subsidy appropriation                                                                                       23,858          24,000                   24,000                                                   +142                 
Total, Overseas Private Investment Corporation                                                            -207,001        -211,115                 -211,115                                                 -4,114                 
FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT                                                                                                                                                                                                
Trade and development agency                                                                                49,705          50,000                   49,000                                                   -705          -1,000 
Total, title I, Export and investment assistance                                                          -118,831           5,925                   -5,075                                               +113,756         -11,000 
TITLE II--BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE                                                                                                                                                                                            
FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT                                                                                                                                                                                                
United States Agency for International Development                                                                                                                                                                                 
Child survival and health programs fund                                                                  1,824,174       1,420,000                1,550,000                                               -274,174        +130,000 
(Transfer out)                                                                                            (-6,000)                                 (-6,000)                                                               (-6,000) 
Development assistance                                                                                   1,376,829       1,329,000                1,460,000                                                +83,171        +131,000 
(Transfer out)                                                                                           (-21,000)       (-21,000)                (-21,000)                                                                        
(Transfer out)                                                                                                                                    (-24,000)                                              (-24,000)       (-24,000) 
International disaster and famine assistance                                                               253,993         385,500                  385,500                                               +131,507                 
Emergency supplemental (Public Law 108-106)                                                                110,000                                                                                        -110,000                 
(By transfer emergency appropriations)                                                                                                            (150,000)                                             (+150,000)      (+150,000) 
(By transfer) (Public Law 108-106)                                                                       (110,000)                                                                                      (-110,000)                 
Subtotal, Disaster assistance                                                                              363,993         385,500                  385,500                                                +21,507                 
Transition Initiatives                                                                                      54,676          62,800                   50,000                                                 -4,676         -12,800 
Development Credit Authority:                                                                                                                                                                                                      
(By transfer)                                                                                             (21,000)        (21,000)                 (21,000)                                                                        
Administrative expenses                                                                                      7,953           8,000                    8,000                                                    +47                 
Subtotal, Development assistance                                                                         3,627,625       3,205,300                3,453,500                                               -174,125        +248,200 
Payment to the Foreign Service Retirement and Disability Fund                                               43,859          42,500                   42,500                                                 -1,359                 
Operating expenses of the U.S. Agency for International Development                                        600,536         623,400                  600,000                                                   -536         -23,400 
Emergency supplemental (Public Law 108-106)                                                                 40,000                                                                                         -40,000                 
(By transfer)                                                                                              (6,000)                                  (6,000)                                                               (+6,000) 
(By transfer)                                                                                                                                      (24,000)                                              (+24,000)       (+24,000) 
Emergency supplemental (Public Law 108-106) (Transfer to U.S. AID Office of Inspector General)            (-1,900)                                                                                        (+1,900)                 
Subtotal, US AID                                                                                           640,536         623,400                  600,000                                                -40,536         -23,400 
Capital Investment Fund                                                                                     81,715          64,800                   59,000                                                -22,715          -5,800 
Emergency supplemental (Public Law 108-106)                                                                 16,600                                                                                         -16,600                 
Subtotal, Capital investment fund                                                                           98,315          64,800                   59,000                                                -39,315          -5,800 
Operating expenses of the U.S. Agency for International Development Office of Inspector General             34,794          35,000                   35,000                                                   +206                 
Emergency supplemental (Public Law 108-106)(By transfer)                                                   (1,900)                                                                                        (-1,900)                 
Subtotal, Operating expenses                                                                                34,794          35,000                   35,000                                                   +206                 
Total, U.S. AID                                                                                          4,445,129       3,971,000                4,190,000                                               -255,129        +219,000 
Other Bilateral Economic Assistance                                                                                                                                                                                                
Economic support fund:                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Israel                                                                                                     477,168         360,000                  360,000                                               -117,168                 
Egypt                                                                                                      571,608         535,000                  535,000                                                -36,608                 
Other                                                                                                    1,071,143       1,616,500                1,575,000                                               +503,857         -41,500 
Economic support fund (Public Law 108-106)                                                                 872,000                                                                                        -872,000                 
(By transfer) (Public Law 108-106)                                                                       (100,000)                                                                                      (-100,000)                 
(Transfer out)                                                                                                                                   (-150,000)                                             (-150,000)      (-150,000) 
Subtotal, Economic support fund                                                                          2,991,919       2,511,500                2,470,000                                               -521,919         -41,500 
International Fund for Ireland                                                                              18,391           8,500                                                                         -18,391          -8,500 
Assistance for Eastern Europe and the Baltic States                                                        442,375         410,000                  410,000                                                -32,375                 
Assistance for the Independent States of the former Soviet Union                                           584,531         550,000                  560,000                                                -24,531         +10,000 
Iraq relief and reconstruction fund (Public Law 108-106)                                                18,649,000                                                                                     -18,649,000                 
(Transfer out) (Public Law 108-106)                                                                     (-210,000)                                                                                      (+210,000)                 
(Transfer out emergency)                                                                                                                         (-150,000)                                             (-150,000)      (-150,000) 
CPA operating expenses (Public Law 108-106)                                                                983,000                                                                                        -983,000                 
Total, Other Bilateral Economic Assistance                                                              23,669,216       3,480,000                3,440,000                                            -20,229,216         -40,000 
INDEPENDENT AGENCIES                                                                                                                                                                                                               
Inter-American Foundation                                                                                                                                                                                                          
Appropriation                                                                                               16,238          15,185                   19,000                                                 +2,762          +3,815 
African Development Foundation                                                                                                                                                                                                     
Appropriation                                                                                               18,579          17,000                   20,000                                                 +1,421          +3,000 
Peace Corps                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Appropriation                                                                                              308,171         401,000                  310,000                                                 +1,829         -91,000 
(By transfer)                                                                                             (15,000)                                                                                       (-15,000)                 
Millenium Challenge Corporation                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Appropriation                                                                                              994,100       2,500,000                1,120,000                                               +125,900      -1,380,000 
Department of State                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Global HIV/AIDS initiative                                                                                 488,103       1,450,000                1,450,000                                               +961,897                 
International narcotics control and law enforcement                                                        240,274         358,820                  328,820                                                +88,546         -30,000 
Emergency supplemental (Public Law 108-106)                                                                170,000                                                                                        -170,000                 
Subtotal, Narcotics control                                                                                410,274         358,820                  328,820                                                -81,454         -30,000 
Andean Counterdrug Initiative                                                                              726,687         731,000                  731,000                                                 +4,313                 
(By transfer)                                                                                             (17,000)                                                                                       (-17,000)                 
Migration and refugee assistance                                                                           755,712         729,789                  775,000                                                +19,288         +45,211 
United States Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance Fund                                               29,823          20,000                   50,000                                                +20,177         +30,000 
Nonproliferation, anti-terrorism, demining and related programs                                            351,414         415,200                  415,200                                                +63,786                 
(By transfer)                                                                                                                                       (5,000)                                               (+5,000)        (+5,000) 
Emergency supplemental (Public Law 108-106)                                                                 35,000                                                                                         -35,000                 
Subtotal, Nonproliferation                                                                                 386,414         415,200                  415,200                                                +28,786                 
Conflict response fund                                                                                                     100,000                   20,000                                                +20,000         -80,000 
Subtotal, Department of State                                                                            2,797,013       3,804,809                3,770,020                                               +973,007         -34,789 
Department of the Treasury                                                                                                                                                                                                         
International Affairs Technical Assistance                                                                  18,888          17,500                   17,500                                                 -1,388                 
Debt restructuring                                                                                          94,440         200,000                   95,000                                                   +560        -105,000 
Subtotal, Department of the Treasury                                                                       113,328         217,500                  112,500                                                   -828        -105,000 
Total, title II, Bilateral economic assistance                                                          32,361,774      14,406,494               12,981,520                                            -19,380,254      -1,424,974 
Appropriations                                                                                        (11,486,174)    (14,406,494)             (12,981,520)                                           (+1,495,346)    (-1,424,974) 
Emergency appropriations                                                                              (20,875,600)                                                                                   (-20,875,600)                 
(By transfer)                                                                                             (59,000)        (21,000)                 (56,000)                                               (-3,000)       (+35,000) 
(By transfer emergency appropriations)                                                                     211,900                                  150,000                                                -61,900        +150,000 
(Transfer out)                                                                                           (-27,000)       (-21,000)               (-201,000)                                             (-174,000)      (-180,000) 
(Transfer out emergency appropriations)                                                                   -211,900                                 -150,000                                                +61,900        -150,000 
TITLE III--MILITARY ASSISTANCE                                                                                                                                                                                                     
FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT                                                                                                                                                                                                
International Military Education and Training                                                               91,159          89,730                   89,730                                                 -1,429                 
Foreign Military Financing Program:                                                                                                                                                                                                
Grants:                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
Israel                                                                                                   2,147,256       2,220,000                2,220,000                                                +72,744                 
Egypt                                                                                                    1,292,330       1,300,000                1,300,000                                                 +7,670                 
Other                                                                                                      829,079       1,437,500                1,257,500                                               +428,421        -180,000 
(-17,000)                                                                                                (150,000)      (+150,000)               (+150,000)                                               (-5,000)                 
Subtotal, Grants                                                                                         4,555,665       4,957,500                4,777,500                                               +221,835        -180,000 
(Limitation on administrative expenses)                                                                   (40,500)        (40,500)                 (40,500)                                                                        
Total, Foreign Military Financing                                                                        4,555,665       4,957,500                4,777,500                                               +221,835        -180,000 
Peacekeeping operations                                                                                     74,458         104,000                  104,000                                                +29,542                 
Emergency supplemental (Public Law 108-106)                                                                 50,000                                                                                         -50,000                 
Subtotal, Peacekeeping operations                                                                          124,458         104,000                  104,000                                                -20,458                 
Total, title III, Military assistance                                                                    4,771,282       5,151,230                4,971,230                                               +199,948        -180,000 
Appropriations                                                                                         (4,434,282)     (5,151,230)              (4,971,230)                                             (+536,948)      (-180,000) 
Emergency appropriations                                                                                 (337,000)                                                                                      (-337,000)                 
(By transfer)                                                                                                                                     (150,000)                                             (+150,000)      (+150,000) 
(Transfer out)                                                                                           (-17,000)                                 (-5,000)                                              (+12,000)        (-5,000) 
(Limitation on administrative expenses)                                                                   (40,500)        (40,500)                 (40,500)                                                                        
TITLE IV--MULTILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE                                                                                                                                                                                         
FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT                                                                                                                                                                                                
International Financial Institutions                                                                                                                                                                                               
World Bank Group                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Contribution to the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development:                                                                                                                                                         
Global Environment Facility                                                                                138,418         120,678                  120,678                                                -17,740                 
Contribution to the International Development Association                                                  907,812       1,061,310                  820,000                                                -87,812        -241,310 
Contribution to Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency                                                     1,117                                                                                          -1,117                 
(Limitation on callable capital subscriptions)                                                             (4,475)                                                                                        (-4,475)                 
Total, World Bank Group                                                                                  1,047,347       1,181,988                  940,678                                               -106,669        -241,310 
Contribution to the Inter-American Development Bank:                                                                                                                                                                               
Contribution to the Enterprise for the Americas Multilateral Investment Fund                                24,853          25,000                   15,000                                                 -9,853         -10,000 
Contribution to the Asian Development Bank:                                                                                                                                                                                        
Contribution to the Asian Development Fund                                                                 143,569         112,212                   69,691                                                -73,878         -42,521 
Contribution to the African Development Bank:                                                                                                                                                                                      
Paid-in capital                                                                                              5,075           5,100                    1,100                                                 -3,975          -4,000 
(Limitation on callable capital subscriptions)                                                            (79,610)        (79,533)                 (79,533)                                                  (-77)                 
Contribution to the African Development Fund                                                               112,060         118,000                   75,000                                                -37,060         -43,000 
Total, African Development Bank                                                                            117,135         123,100                   76,100                                                -41,035         -47,000 
Contribution to the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development:                                                                                                                                                              
Paid-in capital                                                                                             35,222          35,431                   35,431                                                   +209                 
(Limitation on callable capital subscriptions)                                                           (122,085)       (121,997)                (121,997)                                                  (-88)                 
Contribution to the International Fund for Agricultural Development                                         14,915          15,000                   15,000                                                    +85                 
Total, International Financial Institutions                                                              1,383,041       1,492,731                1,151,900                                               -231,141        -340,831 
International Organizations and Programs                                                                                                                                                                                           
Appropriation                                                                                              319,752         304,450                  328,925                                                 +9,173         +24,475 
Total, title IV, Multilateral economic assistance                                                        1,702,793       1,797,181                1,480,825                                               -221,968        -316,356 
(Limitation on callable capital subscript)                                                               (206,170)       (201,530)                (201,530)                                               (-4,640)                 
TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Child survival and health programs fund (emergency appropriations)                                                                                  150,000                                               +150,000        +150,000 
Grand total:                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
New budget (obligational) authority                                                                     38,717,018      21,360,830               19,578,500                                            -19,138,518      -1,782,330 
(Emergency appropriations)                                                                            (21,212,600)                                (150,000)                                          (-21,062,600)      (+150,000) 
(By transfer)                                                                                             (59,000)        (21,000)                (206,000)                                             (+147,000)      (+185,000) 
(By transfer emergency appropriations)                                                                     211,900                                  150,000                                                -61,900        +150,000 
(Transfer out)                                                                                           (-44,000)       (-21,000)               (-206,000)                                             (-162,000)      (-185,000) 
(Transfer out emergency appropriations)                                                                   -211,900                                 -150,000                                                +61,900        -150,000 
(Limitation on administrative expenses)                                                                   (40,500)        (40,500)                 (40,500)                                                                        
(Limitation on callable capital subscript)                                                               (206,170)       (201,530)                (201,530)                                               (-4,640)                 
(Emergency Supplemental (Public Law 108-106))                                                         (21,212,600)                                (150,000)                                          (-21,062,600)      (+150,000) 
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